Guangzhou Rehabilitation and Research Center for Children with

Guangzhou, China

Guangzhou Rehabilitation and Research Center for Children with

Guangzhou, China
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PubMed | University of Delaware, Guangzhou Rehabilitation and Research Center for Children with, Sun Yat Sen University, Peking University and University of California at San Diego
Type: | Journal: Journal of experimental child psychology | Year: 2015

It has been well documented that people recognize and scan other-race faces differently from faces of their own race. The current study examined whether this cross-racial difference in face processing found in the typical population also exists in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Participants included 5- to 10-year-old children with ASD (n=29), typically developing (TD) children matched on chronological age (n=29), and TD children matched on nonverbal IQ (n=29). Children completed a face recognition task in which they were asked to memorize and recognize both own- and other-race faces while their eye movements were tracked. We found no recognition advantage for own-race faces relative to other-race faces in any of the three groups. However, eye-tracking results indicated that, similar to TD children, children with ASD exhibited a cross-racial face-scanning pattern: they looked at the eyes of other-race faces longer than at those of own-race faces, whereas they looked at the mouth of own-race faces longer than at that of other-race faces. The findings suggest that although children with ASD have difficulty with processing some aspects of faces, their ability to process face race information is relatively spared.


Zhu H.,South China Normal University | Fan Y.,Guangzhou Rehabilitation and Research Center for Children with | Guo H.,South China Normal University | Huang D.,Guangzhou Rehabilitation and Research Center for Children with | And 2 more authors.
Biomedical Optics Express | Year: 2014

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neuro-developmental disorder, which has been associated with atypical neural synchronization. In this study, functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) was used to study the differences in functional connectivity in bilateral inferior frontal cortices (IFC) and bilateral temporal cortices (TC) between ASD and typically developing (TD) children between 8 and 11 years of age. As the first report of fNIRS study on the resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) in children with ASD, ten children with ASD and ten TD children were recruited in this study for 8 minute resting state measurement. Compared to TD children, children with ASD showed reduced interhemispheric connectivity in TC. Children with ASD also showed significantly lower local connectivity in bilateral temporal cortices. In contrast to TD children, children with ASD did not show typical patterns of symmetry in functional connectivity in temporal cortex. These results support the feasibility of using the fNIRS method to assess atypical functional connectivity of cortical responses of ASD and its potential application in diagnosis. © 2014 Optical Society of America.


Zhu H.,South China Normal University | Li J.,South China Normal University | Fan Y.,Guangzhou Rehabilitation and Research Center for Children with | Li X.,South China Normal University | And 3 more authors.
Biomedical Optics Express | Year: 2015

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neuro-developmental disorder, characterized by impairments in one’s capacity for joint attention. In this study, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) was applied to study the differences in activation and functional connectivity in the prefrontal cortex between children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developing (TD) children. 21 ASD and 20 TD children were recruited to perform joint and non-joint attention tasks. Compared with TD children, children with ASD showed reduced activation and atypical functional connectivity pattern in the prefrontal cortex during joint attention. The atypical development of left prefrontal cortex might play an important role in social cognition defects of children with ASD. © 2015 Optical Society of America.


Zhu H.,South China Normal University | Fan Y.,Guangzhou Rehabilitation and Research Center for Children with | Li X.,South China Normal University | Huang D.,Guangzhou Rehabilitation and Research Center for Children with | And 3 more authors.
Progress in Electromagnetics Research Symposium | Year: 2015

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neuro-developmental disorder, characterized by two major domains: impairments in the social cognition and communication as well as restricted, repetitive, stereotyped interests and behaviors. In this study, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) was applied to investigate the atypical activation pattern of language areas (bilateral inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral temporal cortex) and uncover the impact of a specific interest on the brain function of children with ASD. We employed a listening comprehension task to stimulate the language areas of 2 ASD boys (A1 and A2) who had strong interests in the experiment material ("Lightning McQueen") and another 2 ASD boys (A3 and A4) who were matched with A1 and A2 respectively by age, intelligence quotient, language ability and the severity of symptoms. Our results showed that, during the task, the picture of "Lightning McQueen", but not the words of "The little red car", elicited stronger activation in the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus and temporal cortex of A1 and A2 than A3 and A4. These results could facilitate our understanding of language development of ASD and reconsider the role of specific interests (especially visual stimuli) played in the brain functional development of ASD.


Yi L.,Sun Yat Sen University | Fan Y.,Guangzhou Cana School | Fan Y.,Guangzhou Rehabilitation and Research Center for Children with | Joseph L.,Sun Yat Sen University | And 5 more authors.
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders | Year: 2014

The present study investigated event-based prospective memory (PM) and its cognitive correlates in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared to age- and ability-matched typically developing (TD) peers. Participants included 25 children with ASD, 25 age-matched TD peers, and 28 ability-matched TD peers. Participants completed one PM task, and several executive functioning tasks assessing working memory (Block Recall Task), inhibitory control (Stroop Task), and cognitive flexibility (Dimensional Change Card Sorting Task). Results indicated that children with ASD had significantly lower scores on the PM task than children in the TD groups. Additionally, PM performance of children with ASD was significantly predicted by their nonverbal IQ, whereas PM performance of TD children was significantly predicted by their inhibitory control. These results provide evidence for the PM deficit in children with ASD and the effect of cognitive functioning, rather than a specific aspect of executive function, on the development of PM. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Yi L.,Sun Yat Sen University | Fan Y.,Guangzhou Cana School | Fan Y.,Guangzhou Rehabilitation and Research Center for Children with | Li J.,Sun Yat Sen University | And 6 more authors.
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders | Year: 2014

This study examined trust and retaliatory deception in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). In Experiment 1, school-aged children with ASD and ability-matched typically developing (TD) children participated in a game to find a hidden prize. An adult repeatedly misinformed children about the whereabouts of the prize. Although children with ASD did not blindly trust all information provided by the informant, they were significantly more trusting of the deceptive adult than TD children. Further, children with ASD were less likely to retaliate by deceiving the adult than TD children. Experiment 2 showed that children with ASD who distrusted a deceptive adult were less flexible and therefore less able to generalize their distrust to different situations compared to TD children. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Guangzhou Rehabilitation and Research Center for Children with and South China Normal University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Biomedical optics express | Year: 2015

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neuro-developmental disorder, characterized by impairments in ones capacity for joint attention. In this study, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) was applied to study the differences in activation and functional connectivity in the prefrontal cortex between children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and typically developing (TD) children. 21 ASD and 20 TD children were recruited to perform joint and non-joint attention tasks. Compared with TD children, children with ASD showed reduced activation and atypical functional connectivity pattern in the prefrontal cortex during joint attention. The atypical development of left prefrontal cortex might play an important role in social cognition defects of children with ASD.


PubMed | Guangzhou Rehabilitation and Research Center for Children with and South China Normal University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Biomedical optics express | Year: 2014

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neuro-developmental disorder, which has been associated with atypical neural synchronization. In this study, functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) was used to study the differences in functional connectivity in bilateral inferior frontal cortices (IFC) and bilateral temporal cortices (TC) between ASD and typically developing (TD) children between 8 and 11 years of age. As the first report of fNIRS study on the resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) in children with ASD, ten children with ASD and ten TD children were recruited in this study for 8 minute resting state measurement. Compared to TD children, children with ASD showed reduced interhemispheric connectivity in TC. Children with ASD also showed significantly lower local connectivity in bilateral temporal cortices. In contrast to TD children, children with ASD did not show typical patterns of symmetry in functional connectivity in temporal cortex. These results support the feasibility of using the fNIRS method to assess atypical functional connectivity of cortical responses of ASD and its potential application in diagnosis.

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