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Guangzhou, China

Kavikondala S.,University of Hong Kong | Jiang C.Q.,Guangzhou Number 12 Hospital | Zhang W.S.,Guangzhou Number 12 Hospital | Cheng K.K.,University of Birmingham | And 3 more authors.
Social Science and Medicine | Year: 2010

Intergenerational 'mismatch' between maternal and adult environments, common in developing economies, has been hypothesized as contributing to obesity. In a rapidly developing population, we examined whether maternal conditions, proxied by maternal literacy, were associated with adult adiposity, proxied by body mass index (BMI) and waist-hip ratio (WHR) and whether these associations were modified by later life conditions, proxied by socio-economic position (SEP) at three life stages. We also examined if maternal conditions had sex-specific associations with adult adiposity. In a cross-sectional study of 19,957 adults (≥50 years) from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study (phases 2 and 3 in 2005-2008), we used multivariable linear regression to assess the association of maternal literacy with BMI and WHR, and whether the associations varied with sex, age or SEP. The adjusted association of maternal literacy with WHR varied with sex. In women, but not men, maternal illiteracy was associated with higher WHR and BMI, adjusted for age; these associations remained, although attenuated, after adjusting for lifestyle, life course SEP and paternal literacy. There was little evidence that associations varied with SEP at any stage, although continuity of poor conditions into early life may have exacerbated the association of maternal illiteracy with higher WHR in women. Poor maternal conditions in developing populations may increase vulnerability to adiposity in women. Whether such sex-specific intergenerational effects are driven by epigenetics, maternal sex hormones or other mechanisms, remains to be determined. However, mismatched maternal and later life conditions do not appear to be associated with adiposity. Our findings, although preliminary, imply that a transient epidemic of obesity may occur in the first generation of women who experience economic development. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Au Yeung S.L.,University of Hong Kong | Jiang C.,Guangzhou Number 12 Hospital | Zhang W.,Guangzhou Number 12 Hospital | Lam T.H.,University of Hong Kong | And 3 more authors.
Annals of Epidemiology | Year: 2010

Purpose: Observational studies in Western settings show moderate alcohol use associated with better cognitive function, but they are vulnerable to contextual bias. Evidence from non-Western settings may be useful to verify causality. We examined such association in southern China where alcohol use is low. Methods: We used multivariable linear regression in cross-sectional data from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study to assess sex-stratified associations of alcohol use (never, occasional, moderate, heavy and former drinker) with delayed 10-word recall score for all 3 phases (N = 28,537) and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score in phase 3 (N = 9,571). Results: Delayed 10-word recall scores were higher in moderate drinkers compared with never drinkers among men (0.30 words, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.18 to 0.42) but not women (0.02; 95% CI: -0.12 to 0.17), adjusted for sociodemographic factors. Occasional alcohol users also had higher 10-word recall scores among men (0.27; 95% CI: 0.18 to 0.37) and women (0.30; 95% CI: 0.23 to 0.37). These estimates were little altered by further adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors. Results for MMSE scores were similar. Conclusions: Alcohol may not drive the association between moderate use and better cognitive function, which instead may be due to confounding by general moderation in lifestyle. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. Source


Sun Y.,University of Hong Kong | Jiang C.Q.,Guangzhou Number 12 Hospital | Cheng K.K.,University of Birmingham | Zhang W.S.,Guangzhou Number 12 Hospital | And 4 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Objective: To examine the adjusted associations of fruit consumption and vegetable consumption with the Framingham score and its components in the non-Western setting of Southern China, considering health status. Method: Linear regression was used to assess the cross-sectional associations of fruit and vegetable consumption with the Framingham score and its components, among 19,518 older Chinese (≥50 years) from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study in Southern China (2003-2006), and whether these differed by health status. Results: The association of fruit consumption with the Framingham score varied by health status (P-value<0.001), but not vegetable consumption (P-value0.51). Fruit consumption was associated with a lower Framingham score (-0.04 per portions/day, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.08 to -0.004) among participants in poor health, adjusted forage, sex, recruitment phase, socio-economic position and lifestyle. However, similarly adjusted, fruit consumption was associated with a higher Framingham score (0.05, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.09) among participants in good health, perhaps due to a positive association of fruit consumption with fasting glucose. Similarly adjusted, vegetable consumption was associated with a higher Framingham score (0.03, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.05) among all participants, with no difference by health status. Conclusion: This large study from a non-western setting found that fruit and vegetable consumption was barely associated with the Framingham score, or major CVD risk factors. Copyright: © 2015 Sun et al. Source


Zhao J.,University of Hong Kong | Jiang C.,Guangzhou Number 12 Hospital | Lam T.H.,University of Hong Kong | Liu B.,Guangzhou Number 12 Hospital | And 7 more authors.
International Journal of Epidemiology | Year: 2014

Accepted 22 October 2013 Background Observationally lower testosterone is associated with an unhealthier cardiovascular (CVD) risk profile, but this association is open to confounding and reverse causality. The authors examined the association of testosterone with well-established cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors (blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)cholesterol and fasting glucose) and the Framingham score using a Mendelian randomization analysis with a separate-sample instrumental variable estimator. Methods To minimize reverse causality, a genetic score predicting testosterone was developed in 289 young Chinese men from Hong Kong, based on three selected testosterone-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs10046, rs1008805 and rs1256031). Multivariable censored and linear regressions were used to examine the association of genetically predicted testosterone levels with CVD risk factors and Framingham score among 4212 older Chinese men from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. Results Predicted testosterone was unrelated to systolic blood pressure [-0.11 mmHg, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.70 to 0.48], diastolic blood pressure (0.04 mmHg, 95% CI -0.27 to 0.36), fasting glucose (0.02 mmol/l, 95% CI -0.02 to 0.06) or Framingham score (0.02, 95% CI -0.0001 to 0.03) but associated with higher LDLcholesterol (0.02 mmol/l, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.04) and lower HDL-cholesterol (-0.01 mmol/l, 95% CI -0.02 to -0.001), after adjustment for potential confounders (age, education, smoking status, use of alcohol and body mass index). Conclusions Our findings did not corroborate observed protective effects of testosterone on cardiovascular risk factors or risk of ischaemic heart disease among men, but raises the possibility that higher testosterone may be associated with an unhealthier lipid profile. © The Author 2013. Source


Zhao J.,University of Hong Kong | Jiang C.,Guangzhou Number 12 Hospital | Lam T.H.,University of Hong Kong | Liu B.,Guangzhou Number 12 Hospital | And 7 more authors.
International Journal of Epidemiology | Year: 2015

Background QT interval prolongation, a predictor of cardiac arrhythmias, and elevated heart rate are associated with higher risk of cardiovascular mortality. Observationally testosterone is associated with shorter corrected QT interval and slower heart rate; however, the evidence is open to residual confounding and reverse causality. We examined the association of testosterone with electrocardiogram (ECG) parameters using a separate-sample instrumental variable (SSIV) estimator. Methods To minimize reverse causality, a genetic score predicting testosterone was developed in 289 young Chinese men from Hong Kong, based on a parsimonious set of single nuclear polymorphisms (rs10046, rs1008805 and rs1256031). Linear regression was used to examine the association of genetically predicted testosterone with QT interval, corrected QT interval [using the Framingham formula (QTf) and Bazett formula (QTb)] and heart rate in 4212 older (50+ years) Chinese men from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. Results Predicted testosterone was not associated with QT interval [-0.08 ms per nmol/l testosterone, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.81 to 0.65], QTf interval (0.40 ms per nmol/l testosterone, 95% CI -0.12 to 0.93) or heart rate (0.26 beats per minute per nmol/l testosterone, 95% CI -0.04 to 0.56), but was associated with longer QTb interval (0.66 ms per nmol/l testosterone, 95% CI 0.02 to 1.31). Conclusions Our findings do not corroborate observed protective associations of testosterone with QT interval or heart rate among men, but potentially suggest effects in the other direction. Replication in a larger sample is required. © The Author 2014; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association. Source

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