Zhanjiang, China

Guangdong Medical College

www.gdmc.edu.cn
Zhanjiang, China

Guangdong Medical College is a medical school in Guangdong province, China. Wikipedia.

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Burtner C.R.,University of Washington | Kennedy B.K.,University of Washington | Kennedy B.K.,Buck Institute for Age Research | Kennedy B.K.,Guangdong Medical College
Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology | Year: 2010

One of the many debated topics in ageing research is whether progeroid syndromes are really accelerated forms of human ageing. The answer requires a better understanding of the normal ageing process and the molecular pathology underlying these rare diseases. Exciting recent findings regarding a severe human progeria, Hutchinsonĝ€"Gilford progeria syndrome, have implicated molecular changes that are also linked to normal ageing, such as genome instability, telomere attrition, premature senescence and defective stem cell homeostasis in disease development. These observations, coupled with genetic studies of longevity, lead to a hypothesis whereby progeria syndromes accelerate a subset of the pathological changes that together drive the normal ageing process. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Schreiber K.H.,Buck Institute for Research on Aging | Kennedy B.K.,Buck Institute for Research on Aging | Kennedy B.K.,Guangdong Medical College
Cell | Year: 2013

Mutations in nuclear lamins or other proteins of the nuclear envelope are the root cause of a group of phenotypically diverse genetic disorders known as laminopathies, which have symptoms that range from muscular dystrophy to neuropathy to premature aging syndromes. Although precise disease mechanisms remain unclear, there has been substantial progress in our understanding of not only laminopathies, but also the biological roles of nuclear structure. Nuclear envelope dysfunction is associated with altered nuclear activity, impaired structural dynamics, and aberrant cell signaling. Building on these findings, small molecules are being discovered that may become effective therapeutic agents. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Kaeberlein M.,University of Washington | Kaeberlein M.,Guangdong Medical College
BioEssays | Year: 2010

Studies of the basic biology of aging have advanced to the point where anti-aging interventions, identified from experiments in model organisms, are beginning to be tested in people. Resveratrol and rapamycin, two compounds that target conserved longevity pathways and may mimic some aspects of dietary restriction, represent the first such interventions. Both compounds have been reported to slow aging in yeast and invertebrate species, and rapamycin has also recently been found to increase life span in rodents. In addition, both compounds also show impressive effects in rodent models of age-associated diseases. Clinical trials are underway to assess whether resveratrol is useful as an anti-cancer treatment, and rapamycin is already approved for use in human patients. Compounds such as these, identified from longevity studies in model organisms, hold great promise as therapies to target multiple age-related diseases by modulating the molecular causes of aging. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Liu G.,Guangdong Medical College | Cheresh P.,Northwestern University | Kamp D.W.,Northwestern University
Annual Review of Pathology: Mechanisms of Disease | Year: 2013

Asbestos causes asbestosis and malignancies by molecular mechanisms that are not fully understood. The modes of action underlying asbestosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma appear to differ depending on the fiber type, lung clearance, and genetics. After reviewing the key pathologic changes following asbestos exposure, we examine recently identified pathogenic pathways, with a focus on oxidative stress. Alveolar epithelial cell apoptosis, which is an important early event in asbestosis, is mediated by mitochondria- and p53-regulated death pathways and may be modulated by the endoplasmic reticulum. We review mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-damage and -repair mechanisms, focusing on 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, as well as cross talk between reactive oxygen species production, mtDNA damage, p53, OGG1, and mitochondrial aconitase. These new insights into the molecular basis of asbestos-induced lung diseases may foster the development of novel therapeutic targets for managing degenerative diseases (e.g., asbestosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis), tumors, and aging, for which effective management is lacking. © 2013 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Liu Z.,Guangdong Medical College
The Cochrane database of systematic reviews | Year: 2013

Cerebral vasospasm and related delayed ischaemic deficits (DIDs) occur in about 17% to 40% of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) and lead to a poor outcome. Cholesterol-reducing agents might improve unfavourable outcomes. To assess the effects of cholesterol-reducing agents for improving outcomes in patients with aneurysmal SAH. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (May 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1948 to May 2012) and EMBASE (1980 to May 2012). We also searched three Chinese databases: SinoMed, CNKI and VIP (May 2012). In an effort to identify further published, ongoing and unpublished trials we searched relevant clinical trials and research registers (May 2012), contacted pharmaceutical companies and investigators known to be involved in previous trials and screened the reference lists of all relevant articles identified. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared cholesterol-reducing agents with control or placebo treatment in participants with aneurysmal SAH. Two review authors independently applied the inclusion criteria, reviewed the relevant trials and extracted data. We did not perform meta-analysis as we only included one RCT in the review. We included one study in which 39 patients received either simvastatin (80 mg daily; n = 19) or placebo (n = 20) for 14 days. The incidence of DIDs (secondary outcome) was 26% (5/19) in the simvastatin group versus 60% (12/20) in the placebo group (risk ratio (RR) 0.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.19 to 1.01, P = 0.05). This means that, in this study, simvastatin had no effect on DIDs. Two patients in the simvastatin group and one patient in the placebo group had elevated levels of aspartate transaminase or alanine transaminase. One patient in the simvastatin group had a raised creatine phosphokinase. There were no results from this trial for the primary outcome of death or dependency at six months. We cannot draw any conclusions about the effectiveness and safety of lowering cholesterol in aneurysmal SAH because of insufficient reliable evidence from only one small trial. More RCTs are needed.


Vijg J.,Yeshiva University | Suh Y.,Yeshiva University | Suh Y.,Guangdong Medical College
Annual Review of Physiology | Year: 2013

Genome instability has long been implicated as the main causal factor in aging. Somatic cells are continuously exposed to various sources of DNA damage, from reactive oxygen species to UV radiation to environmental mutagens. To cope with the tens of thousands of chemical lesions introduced into the genome of a typical cell each day, a complex network of genome maintenance systems acts to remove damage and restore the correct base pair sequence. Occasionally, however, repair is erroneous, and such errors, as well as the occasional failure to correctly replicate the genome during cell division, are the basis for mutations and epimutations. There is now ample evidence that mutations accumulate in various organs and tissues of higher animals, including humans, mice, and flies. What is not known, however, is whether the frequency of these random changes is sufficient to cause the phenotypic effects generally associated with aging. The exception is cancer, an age-related disease caused by the accumulation of mutations and epimutations. Here, we first review current concepts regarding the relationship between DNA damage, repair, and mutation, as well as the data regarding genome alterations as a function of age. We then describe a model for how randomly induced DNA sequence and epigenomic variants in the somatic genomes of animals can result in functional decline and disease in old age. Finally, we discuss the genetics of genome instability in relation to longevity to address the importance of alterations in the somatic genome as a causal factor in aging and to underscore the opportunities provided by genetic approaches to develop interventions that attenuate genome instability, reduce disease risk, and increase life span. Copyright © 2013 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Liu X.,Guangdong Medical College
International journal of nanomedicine | Year: 2011

The purpose of this study was to develop a transdermal ligustrazine patch containing a stable formulation and with good entrapment efficiency, release rate, and transdermal absorption. Ligustrazine ethosomes were prepared by ethanol injection-sonication, with entrapment efficiency as an indicator. Using acrylic resin as the primary constituent, the ligustrazine ethosome patch was prepared by adding succinic acid as a crosslinking agent and triethyl citrate as a plasticizer. In vitro release and transdermal permeation studies were carried out. Finally, a pharmacokinetic study was carried out in rats to explore relative bioavailability. The formulations of ligustrazine ethosome were 1% (w/v) phospholipid, 0.4% (w/v) cholesterol, and 45% (v/v) ethanol. Ligustrazine ethosomes were obtained with an average particle size of 78.71 ± 1.23 nm and an average entrapment efficiency of 86.42% ± 1.50%. In vitro transdermal testing of the ligustrazine ethosome patches showed that the cumulative 24-hour amount of ligustrazine was up to 183 ± 18 μg/cm(2). The pharmacokinetic results revealed that the relative bioavailability was 209.45%. Compared with conventional ligustrazine administration, ligustrazine ethosome patches could promote better drug absorption and increase bioavailability. This study demonstrates that the transdermal action of the ligustrazine ethosome patch was comparatively good.


Liu X.,Guangdong Medical College
International journal of nanomedicine | Year: 2011

The objective of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of the ligustrazine ethosome patch and antimyocardial ischemia and anti-ischemic reperfusion injury effect. Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided randomly into 3 groups: Group A (intragastric ligustrazine), Group B (transdermal ligustrazine ethosome patch), and Group C (conventional transdermal ligustrazine patch). After treatment, samples of blood and of various tissues such as heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, brain, and muscle samples were taken at different time points. Drug concentration was measured with HPLC, and the drug concentration-time curve was plotted. Pharmacokinetic software 3p97 was applied to calculate pharmacokinetic parameters and the area under the drug concentration-time curve (AUC) in various tissues. The rat model of acute myocardial ischemia was constructed with intravenous injection of pituitrin and the model of myocardial ischemia-perfusion injury was constructed by tying off the left anterior descending coronary artery of rats to observe the effect of ligustrazine ethosome patches on ischemic myocardium and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Results showed that AUC was highest in the transdermal drug delivery group of ligustrazine ethosome patch. There were significant differences in whole blood viscosity, plasma viscosity, hematocrit, red blood cell aggregation index, and deformation index between ligustrazine the ethosome patch group and ischemic control group (P < 0.01). Moreover, ligustrazine ethosome patches could reduce the scope of myocardial infarction induced by long-term ischemia. Ligustrazine ethosome patches have a sustained-release property. They can maintain stable and sustained blood drug concentration, increase bioavailability, and reduce administration times. The drug patch can decrease hemorheological indices of myocardial ischemia in rats, as well as protect acute ischemic myocardium and ischemia-reperfusion injured myocardium.


Patent
Guangdong Medical College | Date: 2012-04-05

Disclosed is an anticoagulant polypeptide and applications thereof. The anticoagulant polypeptide comprises a polypeptide formed by an amino acid sequence as represented in Seq. ID No. 1; or comprises a derived polypeptide that selectively inhibits coagulation factor XIa and is formed by an amino acid sequence, as represented in Seq. ID No. 1, that has undergone one or multiple amino acid residue substitutions, deletions, or insertions. The anticoagulant polypeptide is a selective inhibitor for coagulation factor XIa, has anticoagulant activity and small side-effect, and can be used in preparing medicines for the prevention and treatment of thrombotic diseases.


Patent
Guangdong Medical College | Date: 2014-02-19

Disclosed is an anticoagulant polypeptide and applications thereof. The anticoagulant polypeptide comprises a polypeptide formed by an amino acid sequence as represented in Seq. ID No. 1; or comprises a derived polypeptide that selectively inhibits coagulation factor XIa and is formed by an amino acid sequence, as represented in Seq. ID No. 1, that has undergone one or multiple amino acid residue substitutions, deletions, or insertions. The anticoagulant polypeptide is a selective inhibitor for coagulation factor XIa, has anticoagulant activity and small side-effect, and can be used in preparing medicines for the prevention and treatment of thrombotic diseases.

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