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Lu A.,South China Normal University | Lu A.,Guangdong Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science | Zhang M.,South China Normal University | Zhang M.,Guangdong Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science | And 14 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Three experiments were carried out to investigate whether the the kinship concept had spatial representations along up-down (Experiment 1), left-right (Experiment 2), and front-back (Experiment 3) orientation. Participants identified the letter P or Q after judging whether kinship words were elder or junior terms. The results showed that participants responded faster to letters placed at the top, right side, and front following elder terms, and faster at the bottom, left side, and back following junior terms. The regression results further confirmed that these shifts of attention along up-down, right-left, and front-back dimensions in external space were uniquely attributed to the power construct embedded in the kinship concept, but not number or time. The results provide evidence for the multiple spatial representations in power, and can be explained by the theoretical construct of structural mapping. Copyright: © 2015 Lu et al.


Lu A.,South China Normal University | Lu A.,Guangdong Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science | Hong X.,South China Normal University | Hong X.,Guangdong Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Adolescence | Year: 2015

In this study, we investigated the relationship between perceived physical appearance and life satisfaction, and the role of self-esteem as mediator and life experience as moderator of the relationship in deaf and hearing adolescents. 118 Chinese deaf adolescents (55.1% male; mean age=15.12 years, standard deviation [SD]=2.13) from 5 special education schools and 132 Chinese hearing adolescents (53.8% male; mean age=13.11 years, SD =85) completed anonymous questionnaires regarding perceived physical appearance, self-esteem, and life satisfaction. Perceived physical appearance, self-esteem, and life satisfaction were significantly and positively associated with each other. Moreover, self-esteem partially mediated the relationship between perceived physical appearance and life satisfaction; however, this indirect link was weaker for deaf adolescents than it was for hearing adolescents. Implications of the findings and future research directions are discussed, as are potential interventions that can be applied to increase subjective well-being in deaf adolescents. © 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents.


Lu A.,South China Normal University | Lu A.,Guangdong Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science | Yu Y.,South China Normal University | Yu Y.,Guangdong Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science | And 3 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

The present study was carried out to investigate whether sign language structure plays a role in the processing of complex words (i.e., derivational and compound words), in particular, the delay of complex word reading in deaf adolescents. Chinese deaf adolescents were found to respond faster to derivational words than to compound words for one-sign-structure words, but showed comparable performance for two-sign-structure words. For both derivational and compound words, response latencies to one-sign-structure words were shorter than to two-sign-structure words. These results provide strong evidence that the structure of sign language affects written word processing in Chinese. Additionally, differences between derivational and compound words in the one-sign-structure condition indicate that Chinese deaf adolescents acquire print morphological awareness. The results also showed that delayed word reading was found in derivational words with two signs (DW-2), compound words with one sign (CW-1), and compound words with two signs (CW-2), but not in derivational words with one sign (DW-1), with the delay being maximum in DW-2, medium inCW-2, and minimum in CW-1, suggesting that the structure of sign language has an impact on the delayed processing of Chinese written words in deaf adolescents. These results provide insight into the mechanisms about how sign language structure affects written word processing and its delayed processing relative to their hearing peers of the same age. © 2015 Lu et al.


Lu A.,South China Normal University | Lu A.,Guangdong Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science | Yang L.,South China Normal University | Yang L.,Guangdong Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science | And 8 more authors.
Scandinavian Journal of Psychology | Year: 2014

The present study used the event-related potential technique to investigate the nature of linguistic effect on color perception. Four types of stimuli based on hue differences between a target color and a preceding color were used: zero hue step within-category color (0-WC); one hue step within-category color (1-WC); one hue step between-category color (1-BC); and two hue step between-category color (2-BC). The ERP results showed no significant effect of stimulus type in the 100-200 ms time window. However, in the 200-350 ms time window, ERP responses to 1-WC target color overlapped with that to 0-WC target color for right visual field (RVF) but not left visual field (LVF) presentation. For the 1-BC condition, ERP amplitudes were comparable in the two visual fields, both being significantly different from the 0-WC condition. The 2-BC condition showed the same pattern as the 1-BC condition. These results suggest that the categorical perception of color in RVF is due to linguistic suppression on within-category color discrimination but not between-category color enhancement, and that the effect is independent of early perceptual processes. © 2014 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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