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Gupta S.,Cenovus Energy Inc. | Struyk A.,AST | Gilbert D.,GTEC
SPE Projects, Facilities and Construction | Year: 2011

Carbon emitted on account of our continued use of fossil fuel can be offset using carbon capture and storage (CCS). The technology for this exists, but the economics of it is context dependent, and CCS has shown itself to be not very cost effective in oil sands. Committing to the large-scale sequestration projects needed without properly considering alternatives can prove costly at both the economic and social levels. Charcoal sequestration, discussed earlier by Gupta (2010), provides a few advantages, such as being less costly and lacking any post-operation liabilities. Above all, it is reversible, allowing flexibility of policy and operation and avoiding long-term or large-scale commitments. The economics of the charcoal approach mainly depend on two factors - the cost of the feed biomass and the cost of processing. The first of these is addressed by using municipal waste as feedstock, which can be available free of charge. Expectedly, the cost of processing, the second factor, depends on the apparatus and the scale of operation. In this paper, the authors discuss the benefits and drawbacks of prominent traditional and modern apparatus used for conversion of biomass to charcoal and describe a simple and pragmatic apparatus that could be assembled relatively easily for a small-scale operation such as processing industrial-camp-generated solid organic waste. Offsetting carbon in this manner obviously can be a good way to initiate demonstration projects for the charcoal-sequestration approach because it also helps with waste management. These demonstration projects in turn will help evaluate various aspects of this novel method of sequestration and enhance public awareness on the subject, which in turn will help society make an informed choice to embark on a correct course of action for atmospheric carbon abatement. Additionally, in light of the growing per capita waste worldwide, use of municipal waste as feedstock for charcoal sequestration can be a significant measure of carbon offset at global scale in its own right. Copyright © 2011 Society of Petroleum Engineers. Source


Gopinath M.,Bharath University | Prabakaran,GTEC
IET Conference Publications | Year: 2011

This paper presents bridgeless power factor correction circuits that achieve both high reliability and high efficiency. In electric equipments, using power factor correction (PFC) technology can increase power factor, reduce harmonic pollution on grid and improve power utilization. Rectifier Bridge is commonly used to realize AC to DC conversion in PFC topology and PFC stage realizes power factor correction function. With power level's improving, the loss of bridge rectifier occupies a large proportion in the whole power stage loss. Bridgeless Boost PFC omits Rectifier Bridge by decreasing conduction loss and improves efficiency. This paper introduces the principle of operation including the control scheme and verified performance based on simulation and experimental results. Source


Gupta S.C.,Cenovus Energy Inc. | Struyk A.,AST | Gilbert D.,GTEC
Society of Petroleum Engineers - Canadian Unconventional Resources and International Petroleum Conference 2010 | Year: 2010

Carbon emitted on account of our continued use of fossil fuel can be offset using carbon capture and storage (CCS). The technology for this exists, however the economics of it is context dependent and CCS is shown not to be very cost effective in oilsands. Committing to the needed large scale sequestration projects without properly considering alternatives can prove costly at both economic and social levels. Charcoal sequestration, discussed earlier by Gupta carries with it a few advantages such as being less costly and lacking any post operation liabilities. Above all, it is reversible allowing flexibility of policy and operation and avoiding long term or large scale commitments. The economics of the charcoal approach depends mainly on two factors: the cost of the feed biomass and the cost of processing. The first of these is addressed by using municipal waste as feedstock which can be available free of charge. Expectedly the cost of processing, the second factor, depends on the apparatus and the scale of operation. In this paper, the authors discuss prominent traditional and modern apparatus used for conversion of biomass to charcoal with their benefits and drawbacks and describe a simple and pragmatic apparatus which could be assembled relatively easily, for a small scale operation such as processing industrial camp generated solid organic waste. Offsetting carbon in this manner can obviously be a good way to initiate demo projects for the charcoal sequestration approach as it also helps with waste management. These demo projects in turn will help evaluate various aspects of this novel method of sequestration, and enhance public awareness on the subject which in turn will help the larger society make an informed choice to embark on a right course of action for atmospheric carbon abatement. Additionally, in light of the growing per capita waste worldwide, use of municipal waste as feedstock for charcoal sequestration can be a significant measure of carbon offset at global scale in its own right. Copyright 2010, Society of Petroleum Engineers. Source


McMorrow D.,U.S. Navy | Warner J.,U.S. Navy | Dasgupta S.,Vanderbilt University | Ramachandran V.,Vanderbilt University | And 12 more authors.
IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science | Year: 2010

High-bandwidth (16 GHz) time-resolved charge-collection measurements for heavy-ion irradiation of up to 70 GeV/amu are performed on low-power 6.1 lattice spacing InAlSb/InAs HEMT devices. Event cross sections are measured to be significantly larger than the active areas of the devices. Novel energy-dependent effects are observed. © 2010 IEEE. Source


Kanyogoro N.,GTEC | Buchner S.,GTEC | Buchner S.,U.S. Navy | McMorrow D.,U.S. Navy | And 4 more authors.
IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science | Year: 2010

A novel methodology for completely removing the silicon substrate of SOI devices for single-event effects testing is introduced and demonstrated using a 90 nm, 4 Mb SRAM test vehicle. Applications and significance are discussed. © 2010 IEEE. Source

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