Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Yanggu, South Korea

Byun Y.,Pohang University of Science and Technology | Namkung W.,Pohang University of Science and Technology | Cho M.,Pohang University of Science and Technology | Chung J.W.,Dong - A University | And 4 more authors.
Environmental Science and Technology | Year: 2010

Thermal plasma treatment has been regarded as a viable alternative for the treatment of highly toxic wastes, such as incinerator residues, radioactive wastes, and medical wastes. Therefore, a gasification/vitrification unit for the direct treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW), with a capacity of 10 tons/day, was developed using an integrated furnace equipped with two nontransferred thermal plasma torches. The overall process, as well as the analysis of byproducts and energy balance, has been presented in this paper to assess the performance of this technology. It was successfully demonstrated that the thermal plasma process converted MSW into innocuous slag, with much lower levels of environmental air pollutant emissions and the syngas having a utility value as energy sources (287 Nm3/MSW-ton for H2 and 395 Nm3/MSW-ton for CO), using 1.14 MWh/MSW-ton of electricity (thermal plasma torch (0.817 MWh/MSW-ton) + utilities (0.322 MWh/MSW-ton)) and 7.37 Nm3/MSW-ton of liquefied petroleum gas. © 2010 American Chemical Society. Source


Byun Y.,Pohang University of Science and Technology | Cho M.,Pohang University of Science and Technology | Chung J.W.,Gyeongnam National University of Science and Technology | Namkung W.,Pohang University of Science and Technology | And 6 more authors.
Journal of Hazardous Materials | Year: 2011

Thermal plasma gasification has been demonstrated as one of the most effective and environmentally friendly methods for solid waste treatment and energy utilization in many of studies. Therefore, the thermal plasma process of solid waste gasification (paper mill waste, 1.2 ton/day) was applied for the recovery of high purity H2 (>99.99%). Gases emitted from a gasification furnace equipped with a nontransferred thermal plasma torch were purified using a bag-filter and wet scrubber. Thereafter, the gases, which contained syngas (CO+H2), were introduced into a H2 recovery system, consisting largely of a water gas shift (WGS) unit for the conversion of CO to H2 and a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) unit for the separation and purification of H2. It was successfully demonstrated that the thermal plasma process of solid waste gasification, combined with the WGS and PSA, produced high purity H2 (20Nm3/h (400 H2-Nm3/PMW-ton), up to 99.99%) using a plasma torch with 1.6MWh/PMW-ton of electricity. The results presented here suggest that the thermal plasma process of solid waste gasification for the production of high purity H2 may provide a new approach as a future energy infrastructure based on H2. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. Source

Discover hidden collaborations