Grove City, PA, United States
Grove City, PA, United States

Grove City College is a Christian liberal arts college in Grove City, Pennsylvania, about 50 miles north of Pittsburgh. According to the College Bulletin, its stated threefold mission is to provide an excellent education at an affordable price in a thoroughly Christian environment. Former College president Richard Jewell has said, "The two tenets that this school is most about are faith and freedom."The school emphasizes a humanities core curriculum, which endorses the Judeo-Christian Western tradition and the free market. While loosely associated with the Presbyterian Church, the college is non-denominational and does not require students to sign a statement of faith, but they are required to attend sixteen chapel services per semester. Wikipedia.


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News Article | April 11, 2016
Site: www.nrl.navy.mil

Dr. C. Michael Roland, chemist and senior scientist for soft matter physics in the Chemistry Division at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, has been elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS). Roland is recognized by the APS for important experimental contributions and physical insight into the temperature and pressure dependence of the dynamics of polymeric systems. Roland holds a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry from Grove City College, Pennsylvania, and a Ph.D. in chemistry from the Pennsylvania State University. Prior to coming to NRL in 1986, Roland was employed by the Firestone Central Research Laboratory in Akron, Ohio, with a focus on rubber and fiber research and development. At NRL, Roland continues his studies in the viscoelastic, mechanical and dielectric properties of materials, and most recently have employed elastomeric coatings for application in military armor. Roland was editor of Rubber Chemistry & Technology from 1991 to 1999, and has served on editorial boards including Macromolecules, Advances in Chemistry, and the American Chemical Society (ACS) Symposium Series. He has consulted for various companies, including Acushnet, Allied-Signal, Bridgestone, Fujikura Rubber, Watts Radiant, and the U.S. Department of Justice. Additionally, Roland chaired the 1999 Gordon Research Conference on Elastomers, Networks, and Gels and the 1996 International Rubber Science Hall of Fame Symposium. Author of over 390 peer-review publications, 24 book chapters, 16 patents, and the book "Viscoelastic Behavior of Rubbery Materials" (Oxford Univ. Press, 2011), Roland's publications have been cited 11,000 times, earning an H-index of 53. He has been an advisor to 21 postdoctoral researchers at NRL and has given142 lectures at conferences and workshops, including four Gordon Research Conferences talks. Roland was also the recipient of the NRL E.O. Hulburt Award (2010), the Sigma Xi Pure Science Award (2002), the NRL Edison Award (2000), the ACS Charles Goodyear Medal (2012), and is a Fellow of the Institute of Materials, Minerals, and Mining (United Kingdom). About the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory provides the advanced scientific capabilities required to bolster our country's position of global naval leadership. The Laboratory, with a total complement of approximately 2,500 personnel, is located in southwest Washington, D.C., with other major sites at the Stennis Space Center, Miss., and Monterey, Calif. NRL has served the Navy and the nation for over 90 years and continues to advance research further than you can imagine. For more information, visit the NRL website or join the conversation on Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.


News Article | August 30, 2016
Site: www.cemag.us

A device made of bilayer graphene, an atomically thin hexagonal arrangement of carbon atoms, provides experimental proof of the ability to control the momentum of electrons and offers a path to electronics that could require less energy and give off less heat than standard CMOS transistors. It is one step forward in a new field of physics called valleytronics. “Current silicon-based transistor devices rely on the charge of electrons to turn the device on or off, but many labs are looking at new ways to manipulate electrons based on other variables, called degrees of freedom,” says Jun Zhu, associate professor of physics at Penn State, who directed the research. “Charge is one degree of freedom. Electron spin is another, and the ability to build transistors based on spin, called spintronics, is still in the development stage. A third electronic degree of freedom is the valley state of electrons, which is based on their energy in relation to their momentum.” Think of electrons as cars and the valley states as blue and red colors, Zhu suggests, just as a way to differentiate them. Inside a sheet of bilayer graphene, electrons will normally occupy both red and blue valley states and travel in all directions. The device her Ph.D. student, Jing Li, has been working on can make the red cars go in one direction and the blue cars in the opposite direction. “The system that Jing created puts a pair of gates above and below a bilayer graphene sheet. Then he adds an electric field perpendicular to the plane,” Zhu says. “By applying a positive voltage on one side and a negative voltage on the other, a bandgap opens in bilayer graphene, which it doesn’t normally have. In the middle, between the two sides, we leave a physical gap of about 70 nanometers,” Li explains. Inside this gap lives one-dimensional metallic states, or wires, that are color-coded freeways for electrons. The red cars travel in one direction and the blue cars travel in the opposite direction. In theory, colored electrons could travel unhindered along the wires for a long distance with very little resistance. Smaller resistance means power consumption is lower in electronic devices and less heat is generated. Both power consumption and thermal management are challenges in current miniaturized devices. Zhu adds, “It’s quite remarkable that such states can be created in the interior of an insulating bilayer graphene sheet, using just a few gates. They are not yet resistance-free, and we are doing more experiments to understand where resistance might come from. We are also trying to build valves that control the electron flow based on the color of the electrons. That’s a new concept of electronics called valleytronics.” Li worked closely with the technical staff of Penn State’s nanofabrication facility to turn the theoretical framework into a working device. "The alignment of the top and bottom gates was crucial and not a trivial challenge. The state of the art electron beam lithography capabilities at the Penn State Nanofabrication Laboratory allowed Jing to create this novel device with nanoscale features," says Chad Eichfeld, Nanolithography Engineer. Their paper, titled “Gate-controlled topological conducting channels in bilayer graphene,” appears online in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. Additional authors include Ke Wang and Yafei Ren and their advisor Zenhua Qiao of University of Science and Technology of China, who performed numerical studies to model the behavior of the wires. The high-quality hexagonal Boron Nitride crystals used in the experiment came from Kenji Watanabe and Takashi Taniguchi of National Institute for Material Science, Japan. Two undergraduate students, Kenton McFaul and Zachary Zern, contributed to the research. Funding was provided by the U.S. Office of Naval Research, the National Science Foundation and funding agencies in China and Japan. Kenton McFaul, a visiting student from Grove City College, was supported by a Research Experience for Undergraduates grant from the NSF NNIN. Jun Zhu is a member of the Center for 2-Dimensional and Layered Materials in Penn State’s Materials Research Institute.


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

TOUS LES MONTANTS SONT EXPRIMÉS EN $ CA (SAUF AVIS CONTRAIRE) Cameco (TSX:CCO)(NYSE:CCJ) a annoncé aujourd'hui la nomination, par son conseil d'administration, du Dr Kathryn J. Jackson au poste de directrice, effective au 1er janvier 2017 et jusqu'à la prochaine assemblée générale annuelle des actionnaires durant laquelle cette dernière se présentera aux élections devant les actionnaires et le reste du conseil d'administration. Jackson, une résidente de Sewickley (Pennsylvanie), est une administratrice de société et une ancienne vice-présidente principale et chef des services technologiques chez RTI International Metals Inc. Cette dernière a accumulé une vaste expérience dans la haute direction et au sein des conseils d'administration d'industries extrêmement techniques, y compris celles associées à la production d'énergie nucléaire. En tant que vice-présidente principale et chef des services technologiques chez RTI International Metals Inc., un fournisseur mondial de produits à base de titane et de métaux spécialisés récemment acquis par la société Alcoa, Jackson était en charge de la technologie métallurgique, des produits et des activités de fabrication. Jackson a également occupé le poste vice-présidente principale et chef des services technologiques chez Westinghouse Electric Company, où elle était responsable de la recherche et du développement, ainsi que des initiatives visant la durabilité environnementale. Avant cela, elle a occupé divers postes à responsabilités pour le compte de la Tennessee Valley Authority, une société basée aux États-Unis productrice et distributrice d'électricité, y compris d'énergie nucléaire. « Je suis heureux d'accueillir Kate Jackson au sein du Conseil d'administration de Cameco, » a déclaré Neil McMillan, Président du Conseil. « Son vaste savoir technique et expérience en affaires, à la fois dans le domaine des services et de la distribution au sein de l'industrie nucléaire aux États-Unis, seront des atouts particulièrement précieux pour notre conseil d'administration et notre société. » Jackson est membre du conseil d'administration d'HydroOne Limited, l'une des plus importantes sociétés d'électricité en Amérique du Nord basée en Ontario, ainsi que du conseil d'administration de la société Portland General Electric. Elle est également conseillère auprès de l'école d'ingénieurs de l'Université Carnegie Mellon et membre du conseil consultatif du Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center. Jackson est titulaire d'un doctorat et d'une maîtrise en génie et en sciences politiques de l'Université Carnegie Mellon. Elle est également détentrice d'une maîtrise en gestion de projets d'ingénierie industrielle de l'Université de Pittsburgh et un baccalauréat en physique du Grove City College. Cameco, l'un des plus grands producteurs d'uranium au monde, est également un important fournisseur de services de conversion, et l'un des deux seuls fabricants de combustible approvisionnant le réacteur Candu au Canada. Notre position concurrentielle repose sur notre participation majoritaire dans les plus grandes réserves à teneur élevée au monde, ainsi que sur nos faibles coûts d'exploitation. Nos produits d'uranium servent à générer de l'électricité propre dans des centrales nucléaires du monde entier. Nous poursuivons également des travaux de prospection d'uranium sur l'ensemble du continent américain, en Australie et en Asie. Nos actions se négocient aux bourses de Toronto et de New York. Notre siège social est situé à Saskatoon, en Saskatchewan.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. — “Conservatism” will be supplanted by “Trumpism” when the president speaks Friday at the annual gathering of right-wing activists known as CPAC — the Conservative Political Action Conference — Trump’s adviser Kellyanne Conway predicted Thursday. “This will be TPAC when he’s here, no doubt,” Conway quipped. It was a throwaway line, not a statement of deep philosophical intent. But it spoke volumes about the way the Republican Party has been altered by the rise of Trump, and it sparked alarm even among attendees at the conference. “I think that’s dangerous,” said Sarah Markley, a student at Grove City College near Pittsburgh. “I think that we should first stick to our principles and look for somebody who embodies those.” Conservative radio talk show host Mark Levin, strolling through a crowd of admirers asking him for photos, bristled when told of Conway’s remark. “It’s Conservative Political Action Conference. That’s what it is. It’ll be that 10 years from now,” Levin said. “When I worked for [President Ronald] Reagan, we didn’t call it RPAC. So I would remind them about that.” Ben Shapiro, a former Breitbart News writer who has been a vocal Trump critic, wrote that “the Trump cult of personality is well underway.” “It’s not wrong for CPAC to celebrate Trump,” Shapiro wrote. “He’s a Republican president with a Republican Congress, and he will undoubtedly push some conservative policies and already has (which I have thoroughly celebrated). But to substitute Trump worship for adherence to conservatism is a recipe for disaster.” Conway was not the only high-ranking White House official to be a cheerleader for Trump at the conference. Trump’s top adviser, Steve Bannon, appeared with White House chief of staff Reince Priebus, and the two spent their time on stage alternating between hyperbolic praise for Trump and complaining of how unfair press coverage has been. Priebus said Trump will be “one of the greatest presidents that ever served this country” and that he has already “put in the best Cabinet in the history of Cabinets.” Bannon, the former Breitbart News editor in chief who was considered so unpalatable to conservatives that he was not welcome at CPAC in previous years, said Trump is “probably the greatest public speaker in those large arenas since William Jennings Bryan” and that “one of the most pivotal moments in modern American history was [Trump’s] immediate withdrawal from [the Trans-Pacific Partnership].” Priebus even led the audience in chants of “Trump, Trump, Trump.” Yet most CPAC attendees who spoke with Yahoo News did not believe Trump is a conservative. “He’s more of a populist,” said Kathleen Smero, a sales representative who had come down from Baltimore to attend the conference. Trump campaigned during the election against trade deals and in favor of protectionist policies at odds with conservative belief in free markets, against reducing the national debt, against much in the way of restraints on the presidency, and in favor of big government. And in perhaps the biggest departure from conservatism, Trump supporters backed him because he represented radical change and disruption. But since taking office, he has satisfied the right on several counts, most notably his nomination of a respected federal judge, Neil Gorsuch, to be considered for confirmation by the Senate to the Supreme Court. “I do admit that I had sort of a doomsday scenario when he was elected, but compared to my very low expectations he definitely has exceeded them. I do like some of the people in his Cabinet,” said Jorge Villarreal, a community college student from Houston who voted for Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson for president. And Smero, who voted for New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie in the presidential primary and for Trump in the general election last fall, said she was willing to give Trump a chance. “I don’t necessarily think he’s a conservative. But I think he has popular ideas that resonate with a lot of middle class Americans,” she said. “There’s a tremendous amount of hysteria right now. We need to just kick back, let him work a little bit. Let’s see what happens.” The right’s identity crisis was evident in Conway’s comment and in a speech given soon after that by Dan Schneider, the executive director of the American Conservative Union, which organizes CPAC. Schneider delivered a blistering rebuke to the movement known as the “alt-right,” which includes white supremacist and Nazi elements. “They hate the Constitution. They hate free markets. They hate pluralism. They hate everything and despise everything we believe in,” Schneider said. Schneider said that the alt-right “is trying to worm its way into our ranks. We must not be duped. We must not be deceived.” Behind Schneider, the logos of CPAC sponsors were emblazoned on the stage. One of the logos was that of Breitbart, which has given alt-right views a platform. A year ago, Breitbart ran a piece describing alt-right thought in sympathetic terms. “They are mostly white, mostly male middle-American radicals, who are unapologetically embracing a new identity politics that prioritises the interests of their own demographic,” wrote then-senior editor Milo Yiannopoulos and a co-author. “The alt-right’s intellectuals would also argue that culture is inseparable from race. The alt-right believe that some degree of separation between peoples is necessary for a culture to be preserved.” Alt-right thinkers “truly believe that multiethnic democracies cannot succeed,” Shapiro, a former Breitbart columnist, said last fall. Schneider’s comments were even more noteworthy considering that until two days earlier, Yiannopoulos — who has identified himself as part of the alt-right — had been on the schedule to speak at the conference. It was only after a video surfaced showing Yiannopoulos defending men having sex with underage boys that ACU chairman Matt Schlapp disinvited the provocateur. As if all this were not surreal enough, after Schneider spoke, Richard Spencer, an alt-right leader who led followers in chants of “Hail Trump” and Nazi salutes after Trump’s election last fall, appeared in the hall outside the CPAC meeting and was surrounded by a crowd of reporters. He explained that his views are “about caring about your people.” “My people are Europeans,” he said. Spencer declared that the alt-right “was always about a right wing that was against the conservative movement” and said that Trump “has a connection with the alt-right.” Richard Spencer, an alt-right leader, speaks to reporters before he was thrown out of the CPAC meeting. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) “He has a deeper connection with us than he does with conservatives, who believe in sovereign individuality and free market capitalism and so on. He has a deeper connection with us because we are about the nation too,” Spencer said. Spencer was thrown out by CPAC organizers after his comments to reporters, but some of his comments were echoed by Bannon from the stage a few hours later. “The center core of what we believe, that we’re a nation with an economy, not an economy just in some global marketplace with open borders, but we are a nation with a culture and a reason for being. I think that’s what unites us,” Bannon said. Bannon has said in the past that he is worried about the future of the “Judeo-Christian West.” That’s not exactly the same thing as Spencer’s more explicit references to ethnic heritage. But it is similar in that Bannon’s focus is on preserving a certain culture rather than a set of ideals. That’s what makes Bannon such a controversial figure, and why many traditional conservatives want to keep him at arm’s length. The question is, how much of this will shape how Trump governs and his relationship with what’s left of the right? President Trump denounces anti-Semitic attacks in the U.S. The most interesting man in the White House More than 1 million sign White House petition for Trump’s tax records


News Article | August 31, 2016
Site: www.nanotech-now.com

Home > Press > Device to control 'color' of electrons in graphene provides path to future electronics Abstract: A device made of bilayer graphene, an atomically thin hexagonal arrangement of carbon atoms, provides experimental proof of the ability to control the momentum of electrons and offers a path to electronics that could require less energy and give off less heat than standard silicon-based transistors. It is one step forward in a new field of physics called valleytronics. "Current silicon-based transistor devices rely on the charge of electrons to turn the device on or off, but many labs are looking at new ways to manipulate electrons based on other variables, called degrees of freedom," said Jun Zhu, associate professor of physics, Penn State, who directed the research. "Charge is one degree of freedom. Electron spin is another, and the ability to build transistors based on spin, called spintronics, is still in the development stage. A third electronic degree of freedom is the valley state of electrons, which is based on their energy in relation to their momentum." Think of electrons as cars and the valley states as blue and red colors, Zhu suggested, just as a way to differentiate them. Inside a sheet of bilayer graphene, electrons will normally occupy both red and blue valley states and travel in all directions. The device her Ph.D. student, Jing Li, has been working on can make the red cars go in one direction and the blue cars in the opposite direction. "The system that Jing created puts a pair of gates above and below a bilayer graphene sheet. Then he adds an electric field perpendicular to the plane," Zhu said. "By applying a positive voltage on one side and a negative voltage on the other, a bandgap opens in bilayer graphene, which it doesn't normally have," Li explained. "In the middle, between the two sides, we leave a physical gap of about 70 nanometers." Inside this gap live one-dimensional metallic states, or wires, that are color-coded freeways for electrons. The red cars travel in one direction and the blue cars travel in the opposite direction. In theory, colored electrons could travel unhindered along the wires for a long distance with very little resistance. Smaller resistance means power consumption is lower in electronic devices and less heat is generated. Both power consumption and thermal management are challenges in current miniaturized devices. "Our experiments show that the metallic wires can be created," Li said. "Although we are still a long way from applications." Zhu added, "It's quite remarkable that such states can be created in the interior of an insulating bilayer graphene sheet, using just a few gates. They are not yet resistance-free, and we are doing more experiments to understand where resistance might come from. We are also trying to build valves that control the electron flow based on the color of the electrons. That's a new concept of electronics called valleytronics." Li worked closely with the technical staff of Penn State's nanofabrication facility to turn the theoretical framework into a working device. "The alignment of the top and bottom gates was crucial and not a trivial challenge," said Chad Eichfeld, nanolithography engineer. "The state-of-the-art electron beam lithography capabilities at the Penn State Nanofabrication Laboratory allowed Jing to create this novel device with nanoscale features." ### Their paper, "Gate-controlled topological conducting channels in bilayer graphene," appears online today (Aug 29) in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. Additional authors include Ke Wang and Yafei Ren and their advisor Zenhua Qiao of University of Science and Technology of China, who performed numerical studies to model the behavior of the wires. The high-quality hexagonal Boron Nitride crystals used in the experiment came from Kenji Watanabe and Takashi Taniguchi of National Institute for Material Science, Japan. Two undergraduate students, Kenton McFaul and Zachary Zern, contributed to the research. The U.S. Office of Naval Research, the National Science Foundation and funding agencies in China and Japan funded this project. Kenton McFaul, a visiting student from Grove City College, was supported by a Research Experience for Undergraduates grant from the NSF NNIN. Jun Zhu is a member of the Center for 2-Dimensional and Layered Materials in Penn State's Materials Research Institute. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | December 6, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

ALL AMOUNTS ARE STATED IN CDN $ (UNLESS NOTED) Cameco (TSX:CCO) (NYSE:CCJ) announced today that its board has appointed Kathryn J. Jackson, PhD as a director effective January 1, 2017 until the next annual general shareholders' meeting where she will stand for election by the shareholders with the rest of the board. Jackson, a resident of Sewickley, Pennsylvania, is a corporate director and a former senior vice-president and chief technology officer of RTI International Metals Inc. She has extensive senior management and board experience in highly technical industries including nuclear power generation. As senior vice-president and chief technology officer of RTI International Metals Inc. - a global supplier of titanium and specialty metal products that was recently acquired by Alcoa Corporation - Jackson had oversight of metallurgical technology, product and manufacturing activities. Jackson also held the position of senior vice-president and chief technology officer at Westinghouse Electric Company where she was responsible for R&D as well as environmental sustainability initiatives. Prior to that, she held various senior positions at Tennessee Valley Authority, a corporation that produces and sells electricity, including nuclear generated power, in the United States. "I am pleased to welcome Kate Jackson to Cameco's board of directors," said board chair Neil McMillan. "Her extensive technical knowledge and business experience on both the utility and supplier side of the nuclear industry in the United States will be valuable to our board and the company." Jackson serves on the board of directors of HydroOne Limited, one of North America's largest electricity delivery companies based in Ontario, and Portland General Electric. She is an advisor to Carnegie Mellon University's engineering school, and is a member of the advisory board of the Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center. Jackson received a doctorate and a master's degree in engineering and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University. She also holds a master's degree in industrial engineering management from the University of Pittsburgh and a bachelor's degree in physics from Grove City College. Cameco is one of the world's largest uranium producers, a significant supplier of conversion services and one of two Candu fuel manufacturers in Canada. Our competitive position is based on our controlling ownership of the world's largest high-grade reserves and low-cost operations. Our uranium products are used to generate clean electricity in nuclear power plants around the world. We also explore for uranium in the Americas, Australia and Asia. Our shares trade on the Toronto and New York stock exchanges. Our head office is in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.


News Article | December 1, 2016
Site: www.scientificamerican.com

I didn't post here until recently because America's election of the least qualified president in our history has me scrambling to assess and mitigate the damage. Much of what he's done so far doesn't yet touch on geology, which is what this blog is mainly concerned with - but we will be talking about the threat to our national parks, and there will doubtless be impacts on the USGS and other agencies responsible for essential geological services like volcano monitoring, seismic studies, and similar. Trump is already showing which direction he's taking the country's public education. If you care about kids being taught science, you'd best gird yourself for a war, because we're going to have to fight to preserve our children's right to a strong STEM education. To begin with, Trump's Vice President, to whom he plans to delegate most of the actual presidential work, is an evolution-denying Christian extremist who wants creationism taught in public schools. He's also brought all his political power to bear on overturning the will of Indiana voters while he pushes for expansions of school vouchers and charter schools. Trump also plans to slash NASA's earth science division, which would not only cripple our nation's climate change research, but also have a terrible impact on earth science research. That rather sets the tenor for what's to come. But Pence is merely the beginning. It gets worse. Among the first people Trump reached out to for Secretary of Education is Jerry Falwell, Jr. Falwell runs Liberty University. Their Earth Science department is actually a Creation Studies department. And they're not in the Old Earth camp. Liberty University's Center for Creation Studies is a dynamic, teaching-based academic center. Our purpose is to research, promote, and communicate a robust young-Earth creationist view of Earth history. Beginning with sound Biblical interpretation, we seek to understand how science can inform us about God's magnificent creation. The Center's activities are wide-ranging, both within and without the campus of Liberty University. In addition to our two courses (CRST 290 and CRST 390) which serve LU students, we regularly sponsor prominent speakers representing young-Earth creationism and Intelligent Design to the LU community, provide in-service lectures to LU faculty, and produce informative museum displays on young-earth creation. Our faculty are also regularly requested for speaking engagements both locally and far beyond, with invites from schools, organizations, and churches from California to Canada. The purpose of the Center for Creation Studies is to promote the development of a consistent biblical view of origins in our students. The center seeks to equip students to defend their faith in the creation account in Genesis using science, reason and the Scriptures. So. Trump's first pick to oversee our public education was a young earth creationist whose private Christian college teaches that Genesis is literal history and the earth is less than ten thousand years old. If you want to get an idea of the havoc that wreaks on earth science and the study thereof, I encourage you to read my reviews of Christian creationist textbooks. These are the ideas that are taught in such a curriculum. Do you think a man who promotes those ideas would do a good job ensuring public school kids get an accurate, science-based STEM education? And before you breathe a sigh of relief thinking that the Dover verdict prevents public schools from teaching such schlock, remember that Trump is going to be able to appoint at least one and possibly several Supreme Court justices. The chances of his people protecting science education are virtually zero. Falwell ultimately decided not to take the job - not because Trump is a con artist and authoritarian bully, but because his family didn't like it. But Trump loves him, and you can bet he's going to have a direct line to the Oval Office any time he wants to discuss "reforming an overregulated government system that he believes micromanages colleges and universities." This should chill anyone who believes America needs strong public schools, colleges, and universities. So Trump went with his second choice: a conservative Christian billionaire who also loves charter schools and vouchers for private (including religious) schools. She pours money and support into anti-evolution Christian schools and organizations like Grove City College and the Willow Creek Association. Betsy DeVos has been a disaster for education in Michigan. Now, she's being given the chance to push that failure of an agenda nationwide. If you're horrified, you need to get involved. There are a lot of ways you can help protect America's schools from the worst excesses of the Trump regime. There will be many other opportunities to help, whether you're mentoring a student or marching in a protest. Stay informed, stand ready, and fight for STEM.


Receive press releases from Strathmore Who's Who: By Email Joyce L. Morrison Has Been Recognized as Strathmore’s Who’s Who’s Woman of the Month Joyce L. Morrison, of St. Joseph, Missouri, has recently been honored as Strathmore’s Who’s Who Woman of the Month for January, 2017. This honor has been bestowed in recognition of her outstanding contributions and achievements in field of Animal Health. St. Joseph, MO, December 17, 2016 --( Joyce L. Morrison earned her M.S. at Grove City College and her J.D. at Dickinson School of Law. She is currently the Director of Intellectual Property at Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. The company is a service provider of products that are intended to maintain the health and welfare of animals. These products include a line of pharmaceuticals and vaccines that are used for the highest therapeutic value in the cattle, equine, pet and swine markets. They also offer their customers numerous services for the health and welfare of their animals that go beyond the medicinal benefits, such as diagnostics collaboration, disease management, industry support and education opportunities. Ms. Morrison is affiliated with Biotech Trade Organizations, the American Intellectual Property Association (AIPLA) and the American Bar Association (ABA). In her leisure time, she enjoys the company of her pet dogs. About Strathmore’s Who’s Who Strathmore's Who's Who publishes an annual two thousand page hard cover biographical registry, honoring successful individuals in the fields of Business, the Arts and Sciences, Law, Engineering and Government. Based on one's position and lifetime of accomplishments, we honor professional men and women in all academic areas and professions. Inclusion is limited to individuals who have demonstrated leadership and achievement in their occupation, industry or profession. St. Joseph, MO, December 17, 2016 --( PR.com )-- About Joyce L. MorrisonJoyce L. Morrison earned her M.S. at Grove City College and her J.D. at Dickinson School of Law. She is currently the Director of Intellectual Property at Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. The company is a service provider of products that are intended to maintain the health and welfare of animals. These products include a line of pharmaceuticals and vaccines that are used for the highest therapeutic value in the cattle, equine, pet and swine markets. They also offer their customers numerous services for the health and welfare of their animals that go beyond the medicinal benefits, such as diagnostics collaboration, disease management, industry support and education opportunities. Ms. Morrison is affiliated with Biotech Trade Organizations, the American Intellectual Property Association (AIPLA) and the American Bar Association (ABA). In her leisure time, she enjoys the company of her pet dogs.About Strathmore’s Who’s WhoStrathmore's Who's Who publishes an annual two thousand page hard cover biographical registry, honoring successful individuals in the fields of Business, the Arts and Sciences, Law, Engineering and Government. Based on one's position and lifetime of accomplishments, we honor professional men and women in all academic areas and professions. Inclusion is limited to individuals who have demonstrated leadership and achievement in their occupation, industry or profession. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Strathmore Who's Who


Gonzalez G.,Grove City College
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters | Year: 2011

Several recent studies have reported differences invsini, abundance-condensation temperature trends and chromospheric activity between samples of stars with and without Doppler-detected planets. These findings have been disputed, and the status of these results remains uncertain. We evaluate these claims using additional published data and find support for all three. © 2011 The Author Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society © 2011 RAS.


Although internalization of the thin ideal has been extensively researched and is now regarded as a risk factor for eating disturbance, endorsement of the firm, athletic body ideal has received only minimal attention. This short-term longitudinal study explored whether internalization of two aspects of the current cultural ideal (thinness and athleticism) prospectively predicted three potentially deleterious outcomes: body dissatisfaction, dieting, and compulsive exercise. Undergraduate women (N = 231) completed self-report measures at the beginning of the academic year and again 7 months later (N = 156 at Time 2). Athletic-ideal internalization predicted change in compulsive exercise over the 7-month study period but not body dissatisfaction or dieting; thin-ideal internalization predicted change in all three outcomes. When both internalization measures were tested simultaneously, neither contributed unique variance. Results suggest that athletic-ideal internalization is not as detrimental as thin-ideal internalization. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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