Grigore Antipa National Museum of Natural History

Bucharest, Romania

Grigore Antipa National Museum of Natural History

Bucharest, Romania

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Petrescu I.,Grigore Antipa National Museum of Natural History | Schizas N.V.,University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez
Cahiers de Biologie Marine | Year: 2013

Two new species of genus Cumella G. O. Sars: Cumella solomoni and C. manolelii are described from mesophotic substrata of Puerto Rico and St. Croix (U.S. Virgin Islands), respectively. Similarities and dissimilarities with related species are discussed.


Petrescu I.,Grigore Antipa National Museum of Natural History | Schizas N.V.,University of Puerto Rico at San Juan
Cahiers de Biologie Marine | Year: 2014

Two new species of the genus Cumella G.O. Sars, C. gurui and C. pagani are described from the mesophotic coral ecosystem of Mona island, Puerto Rico, Caribbean. Similarities and dissimilarities with related species are discussed.


Petrescu I.,Grigore Antipa National Museum of Natural History | Schizas N.V.,University of Puerto Rico at Mayaguez
Zootaxa | Year: 2012

Recent collections of the benthic macro- and meiofauna associated with the mesophotic coral ecosystems of Puerto Rico have revealed two new Cumacea from the family Nannastacidae. A new genus Cumellana and two new species, Cumellana caribbica and Cumella alexandrinae are described herein. The new genus Cumellana can be distinguished from the other genera of the family Nannastacidae by having a long antennule and pereopod 2 with short terminal setae, equal in length. Copyright © 2012 - Magnolia Press.


Rozylowicz L.,University of Bucharest | Popescu V.D.,University of Bucharest | Popescu V.D.,University of Maine, United States | Patroescu M.,University of Bucharest | Chisamera G.,Grigore Antipa National Museum of Natural History
Biodiversity and Conservation | Year: 2011

Conservation shortcuts such as umbrella species have been long used for regional protection of species whose distributions are poorly known. Although the European large carnivores-brown bear, gray wolf, and Eurasian lynx-might seem to be robust candidates as umbrella species, their actual effectiveness has been challenged. We used 10-km resolution distribution maps of mammals (n = 10) and birds (n = 55) of European conservation concern in the Romanian Carpathians, and a temporal sequence of land cover maps (1990, 2000, and 2006) to examine: (1) the spatial overlap in distribution between large carnivores and bird and mammal species of conservation concern, (2) changes in forest cover for the Romanian Carpathians during the post-communist period in relation to the distribution of species, and (3) priority conservation areas using carnivores as umbrella species. Approximately 55% of the bird and 80% of mammals species included in this study would potentially benefit from using large carnivores as conservation surrogates. The changes in forest cover during 1990-2006 were concentrated in the Eastern Carpathians, where up to 45% of the forest per mapping unit was clearcut during the study period. Implicitly, the areas of occupancy of the background species were most disturbed by clearcutting in the Eastern Carpathians. We propose that the large carnivores could act temporary as umbrella species in areas that are still relatively undisturbed, such as Southern and Southwestern Carpathians. This alternative conservation strategy will allow time for (1) the new established protected areas to start efficiently and (2) the forestry practices to switch from mostly uncontrolled clearcutting, lacking landscape scale management to ecologically-based practices. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.


Arnold J.,University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna | Humer A.,University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna | Heltai M.,Szent Istvan University | Murariu D.,Grigore Antipa National Museum of Natural History | And 2 more authors.
Mammal Review | Year: 2012

1 The golden jackal Canis aureus is one of the most widespread canid species with a range covering areas of central, eastern and southern Europe, northern Africa and parts of Asia. Distribution of the golden jackal in Europe has been dynamic, including dramatic declines (until the 1960s), recovery (1960s and 1970s) and expansion (from the early 1980s onwards). 2 We present up-to-date information on golden jackal status in Europe and range expansion. 3 For data collection we reviewed the scientific literature and contacted scientists from the relevant countries. We distinguished between vagrant animals and established populations. 4 In the last decade, there has been an increase in jackal records in areas where the species has not been reported before. Increased presence is recorded northwards and westwards of the distribution range of the golden jackal, specifically in Hungary, Serbia and Slovakia. In Austria, the first case of reproduction was confirmed in 2007; reproduction has also recently been reported in Italy. 5 Results indicate an ongoing expansion in Europe's jackal population, with a particular spread of the Balkan populations towards central Europe. Although there are numerous reports of sightings, only few originate from confirmed sources and in many areas status is unknown or vague. There is a general lack of ecological data and almost no information on ecological consequences associated with the golden jackal expansion. © 2011 The Authors. Mammal Review © 2011 Mammal Society.


Constantinescu I.C.,Grigore Antipa National Museum of Natural History | Chisamera G.,Grigore Antipa National Museum of Natural History | Mukhim K.B.,Lady Keane College | Adam C.,Grigore Antipa National Museum of Natural History
Zootaxa | Year: 2014

Two new species of the feather mite family Pteronyssidae (Acariformes: Analgoidea) from passerines of the families Leio-thrichidae and Pycnonotidae in India (Meghalaya, East Jaintia Hills District) are described: Timalinyssus actinodurae Constantinescu sp. nov. from Actinodura cyanouroptera (Hodgson) (Leiothrichidae) and Pteroherpus meghalayensis Constantinescu sp. nov. from Hemixos flavala Blyth (Pycnonotidae). Timalinyssus actinodurae differs from all of the oth-er species of the genus due to a particular shape of the opisthosomal lobes in both sexes and having a strong sclerotised band in postero-median area of the hysteronotal shield in male. The male of Pteroherpus meghalayensis differs due to a very long genital apparatus and unusual length of the tips of epiandrum that extend the level of the genital apparatus. Copyright © 2014 Magnolia Press.


Iftime A.,Grigore Antipa National Museum of Natural History | Iftime O.,University of Bucharest
North-Western Journal of Zoology | Year: 2014

The results of studies on the amphibians and reptiles of the Leaota mountains (Dâmboviţa, Argeş and Braşov counties, Romania), a meeting-point of three Natura 2000 sites (Piatra Craiului, Leaota and Bucegi) forming a wildlife corridor, are presented. Twelve amphibian and 4 reptile species were identified in the field. Their distribution within and around the site is discussed, together with some data on the status of the local population. We remark the relative paucity of reptile species. © NwjZ, Oradea, Romania, 2014.


Iorgu I.S.,Grigore Antipa National Museum of Natural History
North-Western Journal of Zoology | Year: 2011

The bush-crickets Metrioptera amplipennis (Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1882) and Metrioptera oblongicollis (Brunner von Wattenwyl, 1882) are reported for the first time from Romania. Some ecological aspects, species distribution and bioacoustics of both species are presented. The calling song of Metrioptera amplipennis is described for the first time. A key for the Metrioptera species known to occur in Romania is also included. © NwjZ, Oradea, Romania, 2011.


Iorgu I.S.,Grigore Antipa National Museum of Natural History
ZooKeys | Year: 2012

A new morphologically cryptic species of phaneropterid bush-cricket from the genus Isophya is described from the Eastern Carpathian Mountains: Isophya dochia sp. n. Sound analysis and morphological details are discussed in the paper, comparing the new species with several Isophya species having similar morphology and acoustic behavior. Copyright Authors.


Iorgu I.S.,Grigore Antipa National Museum of Natural History
Brukenthal. Acta Musei | Year: 2012

The bush-cricket Isophya pienensis Mařan, 1952 is recorded for the first time from the Western Romanian Carpathians. Minor acoustic and morphological variations were noticed between the four studied populations from Romania: Breaza (Suceava County), Bistricioara (Neamţ County), Baia Mare (Maramureş County) and the newly found one at Roşia Montanǎ (Alba County).

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