Greenville University Hospital System

Greenville, United States

Greenville University Hospital System

Greenville, United States
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Bookstaver P.B.,University of South Carolina | Bland C.M.,U.S. Army | Qureshi Z.P.,University of South Carolina | Faulkner-Fennell C.M.,Greenville University Hospital System | And 3 more authors.
Pharmacotherapy | Year: 2013

Study Objective Data are limited for antimicrobial outcomes in obese patients. This study investigated the safety and clinical outcomes of daptomycin therapy in a hospitalized obese population in the southeastern United States. Design Multicenter retrospective cohort study. Setting Thirteen hospitals in the southeastern United States. Patients A total of 126 hospitalized adult obese patients (body mass index [BMI] more than 30 kg/m2) admitted from January 2005 through May 2010 who received daptomycin dosed on actual body weight for any indication for a minimum of 7 days. Measurements and Main Results Primary safety outcomes included incidence of creatine phosphokinase (CPK) elevations more than 1000 units/L, more than 500 units/L, myalgias, and discontinuation of therapy due to adverse drug events (ADEs). Patients were stratified by BMI class (I, II, or III) for analyses. The average weight was 121 kg, and 39% of patients were considered morbidly obese. Factors associated with an increased risk of primary safety outcomes were assessed through regression analysis. Clinical effectiveness was evaluated as a secondary outcome. CPK elevations more than 1000 units/L occurred in 8.4% of evaluable patients and specifically in 1 (3.6%), 3 (10.3%), and 4 (10.5%) patients in BMI class I, II, and III, respectively (p=0.554). CPK elevations more than 500 units/L occurred in 13.7% of patients with no statistically significant difference noted across BMI classes. Discontinuation due to ADEs occurred in 8 patients (6.3%). One patient developed rhabdomyolysis on day 9 of therapy. Clinical effectiveness was documented in 71% of patients and was consistent across BMI classes. Conclusion Although elevations in CPK increased in high-risk obese patients on daptomycin, discontinuation rates due to ADEs remained low. Further evaluation in a prospective trial is warranted. © 2013 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.


PubMed | Greenville University Hospital System
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of gastrointestinal oncology | Year: 2013

Recent publications have identified positive associations between numbers of lymph nodes pathologically examined and five-year overall survival (5-yr OS) in colon cancer. However, focused examinations of relationships between survival of rectal cancer and lymph node counts are less common. We conducted a single institution, retrospective review of rectal cancer resections to determine whether lymph node counts correlated with 5-yr OS and to explore the relationship between lymph node counts and various clinical and pathologic factors.A retrospective review of our institutional tumor registry identified 159 patients with AJCC Stage 1, 2, or 3 rectal cancers that underwent surgical resection at our institution over eleven years. Univariate analysis was used to explore the relationship between lymph node counts and age, AJCC Stage, time period of diagnosis, preoperative radiotherapy, and performance of TME. Survival analysis was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model.In univariate analysis, there was an association between increased lymph node counts and age <70, higher stage, and diagnosis during the later portion of the study period [all P-values <0.05]. Lymph node counts were not associated with survival in Kaplan-Meier analysis or in multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis.Increasing lymph node counts improve survival and the accuracy of colorectal cancer staging. The body of literature recommends identical minimum lymph node counts in both colon and rectal cancer. In our study, which exclusively examined rectal cancer, we could not demonstrate that increased lymph node counts were associated with improved survival.

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