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Antrim, United Kingdom

Saoir S.M.,Loughgall Co. | Cross G.,Greenmount College | Mansfield J.,Loughgall Co. | Ward F.,Loughgall Co.
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2014

Increasingly, traditional Bramley orchards in Ireland are being replaced with high density orchards. These new orchards have a much higher capital charge at establishment which must be repaid with higher yields. In order for growers to determine their optimal planting density/rootstock combination; it is necessary to commercially evaluate different planting densities. In 2000, a range of different densities was planted: M9's at 672, 961 and 1492 trees ha-1 and M27's at 1279, 1492 and 1957 trees ha-1 (imperial spacings were used to suit the local industry). Yield has increased year on year. Lower planting densities had repaid their establishment costs by the 7th harvest whilst the higher densities took until the 9th harvest. By the end of the 13th harvest the highest M9 density was significantly more productive than the others. The M27 plantings did not perform as well as the M9's but the highest M27 density continues to close the gap on the M9's. Source


Mac An Tsaoir S.,Agri food and Bio science Institute Horticulture | Mansfield J.,Agri food and Bio science Institute Horticulture | Cross G.,Greenmount College | Harun R.,Greenmount College
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2011

Apple Replant Disease (ARD) is caused when an old orchard is grubbed out and a significant pathogen population develops in the soil as the remaining root fragments rot. New roots from young tees planted into such sites are often attacked by these soil pathogens and suffer accordingly. MM.111 rootstocks with M.9 interstems are promoted in the British Isles as suitable for replant sites. Because 'Brameley's seedling' apple is such a vigorous cultivar, it is sometimes claimed that a replant site provides a useful check on 'Bramley' growth and is therefore an advantage. On both clean and replant sites the following densities were planted in 2000; D1 - 7.4×5.4 m (24'×18') open centre on a short stake, D2 - 5.4×3.6 m (18'×12') central leader on 2.5 m stake; D3 - 4.9×3.0 m (16'×10') central leader on 2.5 m stake and the control D4 - 4.3×2.4 m (14'×8') M.9 central leader. The accumulated results for 2004-2007 prove that in the case of 'Brameley's seedling', ARD infected ground significantly increased yield compared to the clean ground - 107 vs. 36 kg. On the clean sites the traditional planting density (D1) produced the lowest yield (16 kg) whilst the M.9 treatment generated the highest yield (61 kg). Source


Ma Can TSaoir S.,Agri Food and Biosciences Institute of Northern Ireland | Cross G.,Greenmount College | Harun R.,Agri Food and Biosciences Institute of Northern Ireland
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2011

Increasingly, traditional 'Bramley' orchards in Ireland are being replaced with high density orchards. These new orchards have a much higher capital charge against them which must be repaid through increased efficiencies and higher yields. In order for growers to determine their optimal planting density/rootstock combination; it is necessary to commercially evaluate different planting densities. In 2000, a range of different densities was planted: 672, 961 and 1492 trees ha -1 on M.9 rootstock and 1279, 1492 and 1957 trees ha -1 on M.27 rootstock. Yield increased year on year and by the fourth harvest, the costs of production were matched by the value of yield for all densities and rootstocks. By 2007 returns from all planting densities had repaid the costs of establishment and subsequent maintenance, with trees planted on M.9 at 3.7×1.8 m (1492 trees/ha) being the most profitable. Source

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