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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

While studying scavenger behavior in Utah's Great Basin Desert, biologists observed an American badger do something that no other scientists had documented before: bury an entire calf carcass by itself.


News Article | March 31, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

The badger may seem small, but it is capable of burying an entire cow carcass all by itself, as evidenced by the first-ever video caught of such an unusual behavior. Researchers from the University of Utah said that they were studying scavengers in the Great Basin Desert when they happened to film a badger digging a deep hole to bury a large cow carcass. The burial, which took place in January 2016, took the badger five days, but researchers were able to capture it and posted a time-lapse video on YouTube. Another badger was also observed burying a cow, but the carcass was only partially buried. Although badgers have long been known to cache their food stores, biologists have observed badgers caching small mammals such as rabbits and rodents but not animals that are larger than themselves. The instance captured on camera is the first known case wherein a badger was caught burying an animal that is bigger than itself. Researchers explained that badgers cache food to keep these away from other scavengers and to place it in an environment where this can last longer. The incident, which was described in Western North American Naturalist, offers evidence suggesting that the size of animals do not matter when badgers cache, and this ability could play a part in sequestering large carcasses that can benefit cattle ranchers. "Watching badgers undertake this massive excavation around and underneath is impressive," said Ethan Frehner, author of the paper that documented the badger behavior. "It's a lot of excavation engineering they put into accomplishing this." In January 2016, the researchers set out seven carcasses in Utah's Grassy Mountains, with each of these carcasses staked down and equipped with camera trap to capture the scavengers that visit. The researchers who primarily study vultures and other scavengers did not initially have intention to study badgers. The study was intended to learn more about the ecology of the scavengers that thrive in the Great Basin during the winter. After a week, though, the researchers went out to check the carcasses but discovered that one was missing. Researcher Evan Buechley thought that a coyote or a mountain lion could be the culprit responsible for dragging the carcass away. When he returned to the site where the carcass was, though, he found that the ground was disturbed. When Buechley looked at the camera trap images, he discovered a badger digging around and beneath the carcass that disappeared into the massive cavity that the small badger excavated. Camera records revealed that the badger buried all the 50-pound cow's carcass over just a span of five days. "Both badgers constructed dens alongside their cache, where they slept, fed, and spent up to 11 days continuously underground. They abandoned the sites 41 and 52 days after initial discovery," researchers wrote in their study. "This is the first evidence of an American badger caching an animal carcass larger than itself." © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

1.93 g/t Au over 15.2 m at Warrior & 1.61 g/t Au over 13.7 m at Peg Leg VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA--(Marketwired - April 25, 2017) - Pilot Gold Inc. (TSX:PLG) ("Pilot Gold" or the "Company") is pleased to announce additional drill results from the Warrior, Aggie, Peg Leg and Dip Slope targets, all located within the emerging, larger Main Zone, at the 100% controlled Goldstrike Oxide Gold Project in southwestern Utah. The Main Zone now covers an approximate 4 square kilometre area that remains open for expansion and contains 8 of the 12 historic pits within the broad mineralized envelope. Drilling is focused on the oxide gold mineralization between, below and down-dip of the historic open pits in order to connect all areas. Highlights from the Warrior and Aggie targets include: Note that due to having two drills on the property, assay results for the holes are not necessarily received in sequence. For a complete table of drill results for the current holes, please click here: http://pilotgold.com/sites/default/files/GS_Intercepts04242017.pdf For a complete table of results for all drilling by Pilot Gold at Goldstrike in 2015, 2016 and to date in 2017, please click here: http://pilotgold.com/sites/default/files/GS_Intercepts2015toxxx2017.pdf For a map of drill collars and traces for the current release, please click here: http://pilotgold.com/sites/default/files/GoldStrike_NR201707.jpg Goldstrike is located in the eastern Great Basin, immediately adjacent to the Utah/Nevada border, and is a Carlin-style gold system, similar in many ways to the prolific deposits located along Nevada's Carlin trend. Like Kinsley Mountain and Newmont's Long Canyon deposit, Goldstrike represents part of a growing number of Carlin-style gold systems located off the main Carlin and Cortez trends in underexplored parts of the Great Basin. The historic Goldstrike Mine operated from 1988 to 1994, with 209,000 ounces of gold produced from 12 shallow pits, at an average grade of 1.2 g/t Au. Moira Smith, Ph.D., P.Geo., Vice-President Exploration and Geoscience, Pilot Gold, is the Company's designated Qualified Person for this news release within the meaning of National Instrument 43-101 Standards of Disclosure for Mineral Projects ("NI 43-101") and has reviewed and validated that the information contained in the release is accurate. Drill composites were calculated using a cut-off of 0.20 g/t. Drill intersections are reported as drilled thicknesses. True widths of the mineralized intervals vary between 30 and 100% of the reported lengths due to varying drill hole orientations, but are typically in the range of 60 to 80% of true width. Drill samples were assayed by ALS Limited in Reno, Nevada for gold by Fire Assay of a 30 gram (1 assay ton) charge with an AA finish, or if over 5.0 g/t were re-assayed and completed with a gravimetric finish. For these samples, the gravimetric data were utilized in calculating gold intersections. For any samples assaying over 0.200 ppm an additional cyanide leach analysis is done where the sample is treated with a 0.25% NaCN solution and rolled for an hour. An aliquot of the final leach solution is then centrifuged and analyzed by AAS. Metallic screen techniques may be employed where the presence of coarse free gold is suspected. Approximately 1000 grams of coarse reject material are pulverized and screened. Two splits of the fine fraction are assayed, as well as all material that does not pass through the screen (the coarse fraction). The final gold assay reported is a weighted average of the coarse and fine fractions. QA/QC for all drill samples consists of the insertion and continual monitoring of numerous standards and blanks into the sample stream, and the collection of duplicate samples at random intervals within each batch. Selected holes are also analyzed for a 51 multi-element geochemical suite by ICP-MS. ALS Geochemistry-Reno is ISO 17025:2005 Accredited, with the Elko prep lab listed on the scope of accreditation. Goldstrike is an early-stage exploration project and does not contain any mineral resource estimates as defined by NI 43-101. The potential quantities and grades disclosed herein are conceptual in nature and there has been insufficient exploration to define a mineral resource for the targets disclosed herein. It is uncertain if further exploration will result in these targets being delineated as a mineral resource. Further information on Goldstrike is available in the technical report entitled "Technical Report on the Goldstrike Project, Washington County, Utah, U.S.A.", effective April 1, 2016 and dated October 7, 2016, prepared by Michael M. Gustin, C.P.G. and Moira Smith, Ph.D., P.Geo. found at the top of this page or under Pilot Gold's issuer profile in SEDAR (www.sedar.com). ABOUT PILOT GOLD Pilot Gold is led by a proven technical and capital markets team that continues to discover and define high-quality assets. Our core projects are Goldstrike in Utah, Black Pine in Idaho and Kinsley Mountain in Nevada. The Company also holds important interests in two Turkish assets, Halilaga and TV Tower, and has a pipeline of Western US projects characterized by large land positions and district-wide potential that can meet our growth needs for years to come. The management group at Pilot Group is responsible for defining two deposits that are now operating heap leach mines, including Long Canyon in Nevada and Karma in Burkina Faso. All statements in this press release, other than statements of historical fact, are "forward-looking information" with respect to Pilot Gold within the meaning of applicable securities laws, including statements that address potential quantity and/or grade of minerals, potential size and expansion of a mineralized zone, proposed timing of exploration and development plans. Forward-looking information is often, but not always, identified by the use of words such as "seek", "anticipate", "plan", "continue", "planned", "expect", "project", "predict", "targeting", "intends", "believe", "potential", and similar expressions, or describes a "goal", or variation of such words and phrases or state that certain actions, events or results "may", "should", "could", "would", "might" or "will" be taken, occur or be achieved. Forward-looking information is not a guarantee of future performance and is based upon a number of estimates and assumptions of management at the date the statements are made including, among others, assumptions about future prices of gold, and other metal prices, currency exchange rates and interest rates, favourable operating conditions, political stability, obtaining governmental approvals and financing on time, obtaining renewals for existing licences and permits and obtaining required licences and permits, labour stability, stability in market conditions, availability of equipment, accuracy of any mineral resources, timing and likelihood of deployment of additional drill rigs, successful delivery of results of metallurgical testing, the release of an initial resource report, successful resolution of disputes and anticipated costs and expenditures. Many assumptions are based on factors and events that are not within the control of Pilot Gold and there is no assurance they will prove to be correct. Such forward-looking information, involves known and unknown risks, which may cause the actual results to be materially different from any future results expressed or implied by such forward-looking information, including, risks related to the interpretation of results and/or the reliance on technical information provided by third parties as related to the Company's mineral property interests; changes in project parameters as plans continue to be refined; current economic conditions; future prices of commodities; possible variations in grade or recovery rates; the costs and timing of the development of new deposits; failure of equipment or processes to operate as anticipated; the failure of contracted parties to perform; the timing and success of exploration activities generally; delays in permitting; possible claims against the Company; labour disputes and other risks of the mining industry; delays in obtaining governmental approvals, financing or in the completion of exploration as well as those factors discussed in the Annual Information Form of the Company dated March 28, 2017 in the section entitled "Risk Factors", under Pilot Gold's SEDAR profile at www.sedar.com. Although Pilot Gold has attempted to identify important factors that could cause actual actions, events or results to differ materially from those described in forward-looking information, there may be other factors that cause actions, events or results not to be as anticipated, estimated or intended. There can be no assurance that such information will prove to be accurate as actual results and future events could differ materially from those anticipated in such statements. Pilot Gold disclaims any intention or obligation to update or revise any forward-looking information, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise unless required by law.


Patent
Great Basin | Date: 2013-10-03

Methods and materials are disclosed relating to an improved method for amplifying a signal in a diagnostic assay for a nucleic acid, comprising the steps of providing an amplification polymer bound to a nucleic acid analyte, wherein the amplification polymer comprises a plurality of amine groups; binding amine groups on the amplification polymer with a detectable label complex; and reacting under high salt conditions an acetylating compound with amine groups not bound with a detectable label complex.


Composition and methods for amplifying and detecting solution-state polynucleotide targets in a single device are described. In one aspect, a method for a coupled isothermal amplification and detection process utilizes a coated solid support, including a solid substrate, a cationic layer, and a plurality of target-specific probes attached to the coated solid support. Polynucleotide targets in the sample are amplified by an isothermal amplification process involving in situ hybridization onto the coated solid support. The entire process can be carried out with a high degree of specificity under low salt conditions in less than one hour. Further aspects of the present invention include methods for coupled hybridization/detection of polynucleotide targets, coated silicon biosensors optimized for use with the coupled detection systems to provide visual detection of polynucleotide targets under visible light conditions, and kits for practicing in the above described methods.


Patent
Great Basin | Date: 2015-11-23

Methods and materials are disclosed relating to an improved method for amplifying a signal in a diagnostic assay for a nucleic acid, comprising the steps of providing an amplification polymer bound to a nucleic acid analyte, wherein the amplification polymer comprises a plurality of amine groups; binding amine groups on the amplification polymer with a detectable label complex; and reacting under high salt conditions an acetylating compound with amine groups not bound with a detectable label complex.


An in vitro diagnostics analyzer and assay cartridge for carrying out biochemical assays is disclosed. The analyzer includes a tilted clamp assembly for holding an assay cartridge, upper and lower motor assemblies for manipulating the assay cartridge, and an optical reader. The cartridge includes an injection port for receiving a biological sample, a central channel through which the sample passes, one or more processing chambers, one or more reagent containers, a detection chamber, and optionally a waste chamber. The analyzer and cartridge may be used for detection of a variety of analytes, including pathogens for medical diagnostics.


Patent
Great Basin | Date: 2015-06-26

Methods, materials, and kits for distinguishing a population of cells or organisms truly present in a clinical specimen from contaminating cells or organisms is disclosed. The methods and kits use a suppressor to avoid false positive detection of contaminants in nucleic acid amplification reactions.


Patent
Great Basin | Date: 2013-06-03

Methods for rapidly detecting clinically relevant mutations in the infectious genome of an agent are disclosed. The methods include use of a novel target and temperature dependent RNase H mediated cleavage of blocked DNA primers to initiate isothermal helicase-dependent amplification of a target sequence such as a sequence in the rpoB gene.


Compositions and methods for amplifying and detecting solution-state polynucleotide targets in a single device are described. In one aspect, a method for a coupled isothermal amplification and detection process utilizes a coated solid support, including a solid substrate, a cationic layer, and a plurality of target-specific probes attached to the coated solid support. Polynucleotide targets in the sample are amplified by an isothermal amplification process involving in situ hybridization onto the coated solid support. The entire process can be carried out with a high degree of specificity under low salt conditions in less than one hour. Further aspects of the present invention include methods for coupled hybridization/detection of polynucleotide targets, coated silicon biosensors optimized for use with the coupled detection systems to provide visual detection of polynucleotide targets under visible light conditions, and kits for practicing the above described methods.

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