GrassrootsHealth

Angels Camp, CA, United States

GrassrootsHealth

Angels Camp, CA, United States
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WASHINGTON, DC--(Marketwired - May 2, 2017) - Organic & Natural Health Association hosted its second consumer retail educational program on April 23 in partnership with Syracuse, New York, health food store, Natur-Tyme. More than 1,200 consumers attended and upwards of 65,000 viewed the content via Facebook Live broadcast. For the 17th year, Natur-Tyme hosted its popular annual spring health fair at the New York state fairgrounds and this year partnered with Organic & Natural Health to secure a keynote speaker lineup including three-time New York Times best-selling author, Dr. Joseph Mercola, as well as internal and integrative medicine specialist, Dr. Dana Cohen; naturopathic and functional medicine doctor, Geo Espinosa, ND; and pharmacist, author and media personality known to consumers nationwide as "The Herbal Pharmacist," David Foreman, R.Ph. Organic & Natural Health's retail membership program, called "The Power of Nutrients," is a unique program in the natural products industry and a key component to its mission that allows the organization to directly connect with consumers who are interested in learning how to live a healthy lifestyle. Its first retail event was held on Oct. 1, 2016 in partnership with Lassens Natural Foods & Vitamins, the 45-year-old California-based health food store, and featured keynote speeches from Mercola, clinical pharmacist and board certified clinical nutritionist, James LaValle, R.Ph., CCN, and executive director of GrassrootsHealth, Carole Baggerly. "We are committed to the consumer, and getting the latest health information in their hands," said Karen Howard, CEO and executive director of Organic & Natural Health. "It's one of the key programs that differentiates us from other trade organizations in the natural products industry." Organic & Natural Health's "The Power of Nutrients" retail membership program aligns with its consumer driven nutrient awareness campaign that will focus this year on the health benefits of omega-3 DHA and EPA. Organic & Natural Health's Scientific Advisory Board will bring consumer attention to research backing the health benefits of omega-3 and the importance of self-testing, showing consumers how to use the omega-3 index to determine adequate levels of DHA and EPA in the bloodstream. The advisory board is led by Mercola and members include: Cohen, Espinosa, Foreman, LaValle, Dr. Kecia Gaither, Dr. Dennis Goodman, Dr. Christine Horner, Dr. Michael Murray, N.D., and Dr. Ken Redcross. These experts will encourage consumers to participate in Organic & Natural Health's international population-based nutrient field trials led by its research partner, GrassrootsHealth, in order to scientifically prove how specific nutrients have a direct impact on disease prevention. The self-testing kit, which can be purchased at www.nutrientpower.org, is unique in that it will test for both omega-3 and vitamin D levels. The program is in partnership with member organizations Aker Bio Marine and Natural Partners' NP Script, its online patient dispensary that will enroll practitioners into the program concurrent to Organic & Natural Health's consumer awareness campaign to encourage individual participation. Organic & Natural Health's membership has grown by 160 percent in less than two years since the original 11 founding members joined in 2014. New members include: American Grassfed Association, Barrington Nutritionals, CV Sciences, Cypress Ingredients, Natural Partners, Neptune Wellness Solutions, SourceOne Global Partners; and affiliate members: Amin Talati Upadhye, Informa Exhibitions and Ingredient Identity. "Our membership growth is due to the immediate and positive impact we are having in the industry for consumer education, research and advocacy," said Howard. "We have fervent focus on these initiatives." To become a member call 202-660-1345 or apply online at: http://www.organicandnatural.org.


News Article | July 25, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

GrassrootsHealth helped implement a first-of-its kind study for pregnant women. The goal was to help pregnant women achieve a vitamin D serum level of at least 40 ng/ml (100 nmol/L) -- which has been demonstrated to be the threshold for benefit in previous randomized trials. The study, Maternal 25(OH)D concentrations ≥40 ng/mL associated with 60% lower preterm birth risk among general obstetrical patients at an urban medical center, was published in PLOS ONE by GrassrootsHealth, the implementation leaders. This population study included over 1,000 pregnant women at the Medical University of South Carolina. Results found that women who achieved a 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum level of greater than or equal to 40 ng/ml (100 nmol/L) had a 60% lower risk of preterm birth compared to those with levels less than 20 ng/ml (50 nmol/L), p=0.0001. Two randomized controlled trials with vitamin D and pregnancy outcomes and an associated post-hoc analysis by researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) showed a 59% lower risk of preterm births with 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of greater than or equal to 40 ng/ml (100 nmol/L) compared to women with concentrations less than 20 ng/ml (the current sufficient level recommended by the Institute of Medicine). This new population study of all pregnant women at the medical center, using the implementation services of GrassrootsHealth and their Protect our Children NOW! program, has confirmed that results can be replicated in a much larger population. There were ethnic disparities within the results, but they were most apparent when the results singled out the women who had at least two vitamin D tests during their pregnancy, with the assumption being that the second test helps the mother zero in on how to achieve the desired vitamin D level. The overall percentage of women with two tests during the study period was 16%. Those with a follow-up test of greater than or equal to 40 ng/ml only had a 6% preterm rate, a full 60% lower rate than the normal population (p value of 0.006). For non-white women only, there was an 18% preterm rate at the start of the study and a 78% lower rate of preterm birth if the women achieved the 40 ng/ml by the 2nd test. Non-white women with two tests reduced their preterm birth rate to 4%! (p value of 0.01.) "These findings are another powerful example of the importance of the environment in our human health," said Roger B. Newman, MD, Dir. OB/Gyn, Medical University of South Carolina. "Our evolution away from sun exposure over the last hundred years has resulted in widespread Vitamin D deficiency which contributes to multiple health consequences including higher and racially disparate preterm birth rates." The protocol followed at the medical center was to test vitamin D levels at the first prenatal visit, then, if levels were below 40 ng/ml, to provide supplementation and retest at 24-28 weeks gestation and again at delivery. Overall, 90% had initial levels lower than 40 ng/ml, and 97% of black women had initial levels lower than 40 ng/ml. Testing early in pregnancy is important for the doctors and researchers to be able to track the effect of supplementation. Also, based on other research published by GrassrootsHealth, the response to vitamin D supplementation varies by a factor of six, so there is no one supplement amount perfect for all pregnant women. Follow up testing of vitamin D levels during pregnancy is essential. Key to the success of this project was the provision of already developed project protocols, measures of performance, and implementation methods for the health care providers, the administrative functions and the patients. In addition, since compliance by both staff and patients is essential, there are reminder systems and predefined questions for decision making to enhance quality performance. The data requirements and analytical structures are also in place to help minimize problems with internal systems. With over 1,000 preterm births/day happening in the United States alone, this methodology can be used to help significantly reduce the preterm birth rate at any hospital in only 2 years, not the standard 15+ years. The next phase of the project at MUSC will be to include further attention to follow-up testing and patient supplementation, and further analyze the around other comorbidities of pregnancy, from the use of the progesterone drug 17p to other basic interventions such as magnesium. There is definitely a sense of urgency to get pregnant women’s vitamin D levels above 40 ng/ml. The GrassrootsHealth Protect our Children NOW! implementation program has been developed to quickly meet that need. About GrassrootsHealth GrassrootsHealth is a nonprofit public health promotion organization dedicated to moving public health messages regarding vitamin D from science into practice. GrassrootsHealth provides a comprehensive set of implementation tools/analytics to help organizations implement population projects in a short timeframe vs. the usual 15-20 years. GrassrootsHealth has a panel of 48 senior vitamin D researchers from around the world contributing to its operations. GrassrootsHealth runs the D*action population intervention program to solve the vitamin D deficiency epidemic worldwide as well as a breast cancer prevention project, a new omega-3 project, and Protect our Children NOW! – a population intervention program for pregnancy.


News Article | July 25, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

PLOS ONE today released a research paper which is the fourth research paper, all confirming the benefits of vitamin D to pregnancy and early childhood. Using data from a 15-month nutrient field trial, the paper reports a 62% reduction in preterm birth when women raise vitamin D levels, as determined by a blood test, above 40 ng/ml (100 nmol/L) by delivery, as compared to women who had levels below 20 ng/ml (50 nmol/L). Women in this field trial were given vitamin D supplements of 5000 IU. None of the 1,064 women in the trial had any adverse reactions attributed to vitamin D supplementation. Vitamin D levels above 40 ng/ml were safe throughout pregnancy. This study focused on preterm birth, defined as a baby being born before 37 weeks, which is the single biggest health risk for infants today. Preterm birth is cited as the reason for 28% of newborn deaths (first month of life). The earlier a baby is born the more likely they are to have health problems. Some of these problems don’t show up right away, they may not appear until age 3, or even later. Longer term problems associated with preterm birth include ADHD, cerebral palsy, autism, asthma, intestinal problems, pneumonia, vision problems, hearing loss, and dental problems. Researchers believe there are other benefits to vitamin D sufficiency during pregnancy as shown on this disease incidence prevention chart from GrassrootsHealth. A non-profit dedicated to moving research into practice, GrassrootsHealth, has spearheaded a program called Protect our Children NOW! that helps medical practices change their standard of care to include vitamin D testing at the first prenatal visit and education to help mothers raise their vitamin D levels to at least 40 ng/ml (100 nmol/L) as soon as possible during pregnancy. This paper analyzes data for the first 15 months of this program at the Medical University of South Carolina. "The message is clear--it is time to move quickly to save the health of the next generation. We can help prevent preterm births now, we don't need more research to get started with the testing and supplementation of pregnant women," said Carole Baggerly, Director of GrassrootsHealth. GrassrootsHealth recommends that women who are 12-17 weeks pregnant join the GrassrootsHealth study for free to test their vitamin D level. For women who are conceiving or later in their pregnancy, GrassrootsHealth recommends using D*action to test vitamin D levels. While vitamin D is included in most prenatal vitamins, the amount is not likely enough to raise your level to 40 ng/ml. Test, use GrassrootsHealth's wealth of information to raise your level, and test again. Try and get above 40 ng/ml as early as possible within your pregnancy. "These findings are another powerful example of the importance of the environment in our human health," said Roger B. Newman, MD, Dir. OB/Gyn, Medical University of South Carolina. "Our evolution away from sun exposure over the last hundred years has resulted in widespread Vitamin D deficiency which contributes to multiple health consequences including higher and racially disparate preterm birth rates." Folic acid is currently considered a must for pregnant women as it has been shown to reduce neural tube defects up to 70%. Most pregnant women take folic acid, but it took 30 years to become standard practice. We can't wait 30 years to get vitamin D to all pregnant women! GrassrootsHealth urges all pregnant women to measure their vitamin D levels -- either at home or with their OB. GrassrootsHealth is a nonprofit public health research organization dedicated to moving public health messages regarding vitamin D from science into practice. It has a panel of 48 senior vitamin D researchers from around the world contributing to its operations. GrassrootsHealth is currently running the D*action population intervention program to solve the vitamin D deficiency epidemic worldwide. Under the D*action umbrella, there are programs looking at the entire population as well as targeted programs for breast cancer prevention, Omega-3 project and a ‘Protect Our Children NOW!’ program to reduce the complications of vitamin D deficiency encountered during pregnancy and childhood.


News Article | July 27, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

GrassrootsHealth helped implement a first-of-its kind study for pregnant women. The goal was to help pregnant women achieve a vitamin D serum level of at least 40 ng/ml (100 nmol/L) -- which has been demonstrated to be the threshold for benefit in previous randomized trials. The study, Maternal 25(OH)D concentrations ≥40 ng/mL associated with 60% lower preterm birth risk among general obstetrical patients at an urban medical center, was published in PLOS ONE by GrassrootsHealth, the implementation leaders. This population study included over 1,000 pregnant women at the Medical University of South Carolina. Results found that women who achieved a 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum level of greater than or equal to 40 ng/ml (100 nmol/L) had a 60% lower risk of preterm birth compared to those with levels less than 20 ng/ml (50 nmol/L), p=0.0001. Two randomized controlled trials with vitamin D and pregnancy outcomes and an associated post-hoc analysis by researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) showed a 59% lower risk of preterm births with 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels of greater than or equal to 40 ng/ml (100 nmol/L) compared to women with concentrations less than 20 ng/ml (the current sufficient level recommended by the Institute of Medicine). This new population study of all pregnant women at the medical center, using the implementation services of GrassrootsHealth and their Protect our Children NOW! program, has confirmed that results can be replicated in a much larger population. There were ethnic disparities within the results, but they were most apparent when the results singled out the women who had at least two vitamin D tests during their pregnancy, with the assumption being that the second test helps the mother zero in on how to achieve the desired vitamin D level. The overall percentage of women with two tests during the study period was 16%. Those with a follow-up test of greater than or equal to 40 ng/ml only had a 6% preterm rate, a full 60% lower rate than the normal population (p value of 0.006). For non-white women only, there was an 18% preterm rate at the start of the study and a 78% lower rate of preterm birth if the women achieved the 40 ng/ml by the 2nd test. Non-white women with two tests reduced their preterm birth rate to 4%! (p value of 0.01.) "These findings are another powerful example of the importance of the environment in our human health," said Roger B. Newman, MD, Dir. OB/Gyn, Medical University of South Carolina. "Our evolution away from sun exposure over the last hundred years has resulted in widespread Vitamin D deficiency which contributes to multiple health consequences including higher and racially disparate preterm birth rates." The protocol followed at the medical center was to test vitamin D levels at the first prenatal visit, then, if levels were below 40 ng/ml, to provide supplementation and retest at 24-28 weeks gestation and again at delivery. Overall, 90% had initial levels lower than 40 ng/ml, and 97% of black women had initial levels lower than 40 ng/ml. Testing early in pregnancy is important for the doctors and researchers to be able to track the effect of supplementation. Also, based on other research published by GrassrootsHealth, the response to vitamin D supplementation varies by a factor of six, so there is no one supplement amount perfect for all pregnant women. Follow up testing of vitamin D levels during pregnancy is essential. Key to the success of this project was the provision of already developed project protocols, measures of performance, and implementation methods for the health care providers, the administrative functions and the patients. In addition, since compliance by both staff and patients is essential, there are reminder systems and predefined questions for decision making to enhance quality performance. The data requirements and analytical structures are also in place to help minimize problems with internal systems. With over 1,000 preterm births/day happening in the United States alone, this methodology can be used to help significantly reduce the preterm birth rate at any hospital in only 2 years, not the standard 15+ years. The next phase of the project at MUSC will be to include further attention to follow-up testing and patient supplementation, and further analyze the around other comorbidities of pregnancy, from the use of the progesterone drug 17p to other basic interventions such as magnesium. There is definitely a sense of urgency to get pregnant women’s vitamin D levels above 40 ng/ml. The GrassrootsHealth Protect our Children NOW! implementation program has been developed to quickly meet that need. About GrassrootsHealth GrassrootsHealth is a nonprofit public health promotion organization dedicated to moving public health messages regarding vitamin D from science into practice. GrassrootsHealth provides a comprehensive set of implementation tools/analytics to help organizations implement population projects in a short timeframe vs. the usual 15-20 years. GrassrootsHealth has a panel of 48 senior vitamin D researchers from around the world contributing to its operations. GrassrootsHealth runs the D*action population intervention program to solve the vitamin D deficiency epidemic worldwide as well as a breast cancer prevention project, a new omega-3 project, and Protect our Children NOW! – a population intervention program for pregnancy.


WASHINGTON, DC--(Marketwired - Feb 16, 2017) - Organic & Natural Health Association (Organic & Natural Health) hosted its second annual national conference Jan. 24-25 at the Pink Shell Beach Resort & Spa in Fort Myers, Florida, with 52 members and guests in attendance and announced a new nutrient initiative for 2017, in addition to a partnership with HRI Labs for a first-of-its-kind pesticide product testing program for members. Coming off a successful yearlong consumer education program, "The Power of D," that garnered more than 35 million media impressions promoting the benefits of vitamin D and encouraging consumers to get their levels tested as part of an international population-based nutrient study with research partner GrassrootsHealth, Organic & Natural Health announced it will continue to run consecutive nutrient campaigns as part of its consumer education initiative with a new nutrient focus each year under the updated campaign name, "The Power of Nutrients" (www.nutrientpower.org). The 2017 nutrient campaign will focus on omega-3 DHA and EPA and will leverage the expertise of Organic & Natural Health's Scientific Advisory Board to bring consumer attention to research backing the health benefits of omega-3 and the importance of self-testing, showing consumers how to use the omega-3 index, developed by William S. Harris, PhD, FAHA, to determine adequate levels of DHA and EPA in the bloodstream. The advisory board is led by Dr. Joseph Mercola and expert members include: Dr. Dana Cohen, Dr. Geo Espinosa, David Foreman, R.Ph., Dr. Dennis Goodman, Dr. Christine Horner, James LaValle, R.Ph., CCN, Dr. Michael Murray, N.D., and Dr. Ken Redcross. Organic & Natural Health is partnering with GrassrootsHealth, which will run the omega-3 nutrient field study and testing program being developed in partnership with member organizations Aker Bio Marine and Natural Partners' NP Script, its online patient dispensary that will enroll practitioners into the program concurrent to Organic & Natural Health's consumer awareness campaign to encourage individual participation. The at-home, self-test will determine omega-3 DHA and EPA levels as well as vitamin D levels. The program and awareness campaign launches this spring. "There are so many variables with nutrient studies it's important to do field studies to collect as much data as possible. By measuring omega-3, DHA and EPA levels along with vitamin D serum levels, we can help to pinpoint exactly what's working and what combinations of these nutrients are needed for improved outcomes for a variety of health conditions," said Carole Baggerly, director of GrassrootsHealth. "Because we are partnering with Organic & Natural Health Association we will be able to publish peer-reviewed research on the health outcomes of combining omega-3 and vitamin D supplementation." Organic & Natural Health also announced its partnership with HRI Labs to test its members' raw ingredients and finished products for pesticide residue. Organization members are being invited to voluntarily test their ingredients and products, with board member Patrick Sullivan Jr., president of Jigsaw Health, being the first to voluntarily put his product line through the testing. "As an industry we need to be proactively transparent about looking for extremely harmful and dangerous pesticides like glyphosate in our own products," said Karen Howard, CEO and executive director of Organic & Natural Health Association. "This is just one of our pro-active steps in effectively eliminating pesticides from organic and natural source materials and part of Organic & Natural Health's membership requirements to be in pursuit of non-GMO status." Organic & Natural Health will host its next conference Jan. 23-24, 2018, at the Pink Shell Beach Resort & Spa in Fort Myers, Florida. To become a member call 202-660-1345 or apply online at: http://www.organicandnatural.org.


News Article | November 29, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The American College of Nutrition honored non-profit, GrassrootsHealth, with their Humanitarian Award at their 57th annual conference held in San Diego November 9 - 11. This award is presented to individuals or organizations who have worked selflessly and effectively in the broader field of nutrition to benefit humanity. Past recipients include UNICEF, David Perlmutter (author of Grain Brain), and Vitamin Angels. The Humanitarian Award was presented to GrassrootsHealth to honor their tireless efforts to move vitamin D research into practice. Without the work of GrassrootsHealth it might take another generation to bring this low-cost, safe, nutritional need to light. In addition to working with over 10,000 individuals in their D*action program to test vitamin D levels, GrassrootsHealth is also teaming up with hospitals and cancer centers across the country to make optimizing vitamin D levels a standard of care. “This award is especially deserved given the crisis of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency across America, especially in minority communities, and its profound health impacts,” states Michael Stroka, Executive Director of the American College of Nutrition. “We are grateful to Carole for her team’s work on behalf of human health, and are pleased to be able to recognize and contribute to their work in this way.” The Humanitarian Award comes with a monetary donation derived from proceeds of the exhibit hall. This year, the donation that accompanied the award was $28,000. GrassrootsHealth will use the funds to further their work of moving vitamin D research into practice – helping to expand their public reach and education. “I share this award with the 48 vitamin D scientists and researchers who share a common goal and have worked countless hours to this end,” stated Carole Baggerly, Founder and Director of GrassrootsHealth. “Together, we have the methodology to implement the call to action – to get the WORLD to the recommended 40-60 ng/ml (100-150 nmol/L). Participating medical institutions are realizing both health benefits and cost savings in their practice by optimizing vitamin D levels. These institutions either participate in our pregnancy project, Protect our Children NOW! or our new Cancer Prevention project.” GrassrootsHealth is a nonprofit public health research organization dedicated to moving public health messages regarding vitamin D from research into practice. It has a panel of 48 senior vitamin D researchers from around the world contributing to its operations. GrassrootsHealth is currently running the D*action population intervention program to solve the vitamin D deficiency epidemic worldwide. Under the D*action umbrella, there are programs looking at the entire population as well as targeted programs for breast cancer prevention and a ‘Protect Our Children NOW!’ program to stop vitamin D deficiency where it starts, in utero. About the American College of Nutrition The American College of Nutrition, founded in 1959, is on a mission to advance nutrition science to prevent and treat disease. Key goals of the professional society are to stimulate nutrition research and publication, elevate nutrition knowledge among clinicians and researchers, and provide practical guidance on clinical nutrition. The American College of Nutrition accepts no funding from for-profit corporations fostering its mission and ability to advance uncompromising science.


Heaney R.P.,Creighton University | Armas L.A.G.,Creighton University | French C.,GrassRootsHealth
Journal of Nutrition | Year: 2013

The magnitude of vitamin D inputs in individuals not taking supplements is unknown; however, there is a great deal of information on quantitative response to varying supplement doses. We reanalyzed individual 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration data from 8 studies involving cholecalciferol supplementation (total sample size = 3000). We extrapolated individual study dose-response curves to zero concentration values for serum 25(OH)D by using both linear and curvilinear approaches and measured seasonal oscillation in the serum 25(OH)D concentration. The total basal input (food plus solar) was calculated to range from a low of 778 IU/d in patients with end-stage renal disease to a high of 2667 IU/d in healthy Caucasian adults. Consistent with expectations, obese individuals had lower baseline, unsupplemented 25(OH)D concentrations and a smaller response to supplements. Similarly, African Americans had both lower baseline concentrations and lower calculated basal, all-source inputs. Seasonal oscillation i n 4 studies ranged from 5.20 to 11.4 nmol/L, reflecting a mean cutaneous synthesis of cholecalciferol ranging from 209 to 651 IU/d at the summer peak. We conclude that: 1) all-source, basal vitamin D inputs are approximately an order of magnitude higher than can be explained by traditional food sources; 2) cutaneous, solar input in these cohorts accounts for only 10-25% of unsupplemented input at the summer peak; and 3) the remainder must come from undocumented food sources, possibly in part as preformed 25(OH)D. © 2013 American Society for Nutrition.


Garland C.F.,University of California at San Diego | French C.B.,GrassrootsHealth | Baggerly L.L.,GrassrootsHealth | Heaney R.P.,Creighton University
Anticancer Research | Year: 2011

Background: Studies indicate that intake of vitamin D in the range from 1,100 to 4,000 IU/d and a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration [25(OH)D] from 60-80 nglml may be needed to reduce cancer risk. Few community-based studies allow estimation of the dose-response relationship between oral intake of vitamin D and corresponding serum 25(OH)D in the range above 1,000 IU/d. Materials and Methods: A descriptive study of serum 25(OH)D concentration and self-reported vitamin D intake in a community-based cohort (n=3,667, mean age 51.3±13.4 y). Results: Serum 25(OH)D rose as a function of self-reported vitamin D supplement ingestion in a curvilinear fashion, with no intakes of 10,000 IU/d or lower producing 25(OH)D values above the lower-bound of the zone of potential toxicity (200 ng/ml). Unsupplemented all-source input was estimated at 3,300 IU/d. The supplemental dose ensuring that 975% of this population achieved a serum 25(OH)D of at least 40 ng/ml was 9,600 IU/d. Conclusion: Universal intake of up to 40,000 IU vitamin D per day is unlikely to result in vitamin D toxicity.


McDonnell S.L.,GrassrootsHealth | French C.B.,GrassrootsHealth | Heaney R.P.,Creighton University
Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology | Year: 2014

Cutaneous synthesis and traditional food sources do not fully account for unsupplemented vitamin D status. Non-traditional food sources may be an undiscovered input. In a cohort of 780 non-supplement-taking adults with a mean serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] of 33 (±14) ng/ml we assessed the relationship between vitamin D status and selected food sources. Serum 25(OH)D concentration was adjusted for season, UVB exposures, and body size. These adjusted values were then regressed against multiple food items and combinations. Whole milk cottage cheese, eggs, red meat, and total protein were positively associated with total 25(OH)D and/or 25(OH)D3 (P < 0.05 for each), whereas fish and milk intake were not. The slope of the relationship was such that for every intake of 1 serving/day, serum 25(OH)D rose by about 2 ng/ml for eggs and 1 ng/ml for meat and total protein. For every weekly serving of whole milk cottage cheese, serum 25(OH)D rose by about 1 ng/ml. While some food sources were significant predictors of vitamin D status, their ability to explain inter-individual variability was limited. Supplementation will likely remain essential to improving vitamin D status on a population level. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '16th Vitamin D Workshop'. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


SAN DIEGO, Nov. 21, 2016 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A landmark study published Friday in the Journal Dermato-Endocrinology has world-renowned researchers calling insufficient sun exposure an emerging health problem in the United States. In their paper, The Risks and Benefits of Sun...

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