Philadelphia, PA, United States
Philadelphia, PA, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Chicago, May 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The John Marshall Law School in Chicago is pleased to announce that Nancy Shalowitz has joined the law school as its new General Counsel and Assistant Dean for Human Resources. She also will serve as Secretary to The John Marshall Law School Board of Trustees. “I’m excited to have Nancy join the law school in this inaugural role. She brings a wealth of experience and I know she will help us move forward on many fronts," said John Marshall Law School Dean Darby Dickerson. Shalowitz has spent much of her career in a general counsel role, overseeing human resources, compliance issues and operations. Most recently, she served as Assistant General Counsel at Lundbeck LLC, a global pharmaceutical company. Shalowitz also comes to John Marshall with experience in higher education, having served as the Director of the Health Law Institute and Graduate Programs at DePaul University College of Law. She also was an adjunct professor there where she developed and taught core courses at the Health Law Institute and in DePaul’s graduate School of Public Service. “For over a century, The John Marshall Law School has been an integral part of Chicago.  I’m pleased to be a part of the continuing legacy and contributions that the law school brings to the legal community,” Shalowitz said. Shalowitz received a JD from DePaul University College of Law in Chicago, an MHA in healthcare administration from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and a BA from Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts. The John Marshall Law School, founded in 1899, is an independent law school located in the heart of Chicago's legal, financial and commercial districts. The 2018 U.S. News & World Report's America's Best Graduate Schools ranks John Marshall's Lawyering Skills Program 5th, its Trial Advocacy Program 13th and its Intellectual Property Law Program 19th in the nation. Since its inception, John Marshall has been a pioneer in legal education and has been guided by a tradition of diversity, innovation, access and opportunity. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/fe1eb0a5-1335-4a40-bd62-36e04244a2a3


Chicago, May 15, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The John Marshall Law School in Chicago is pleased to announce that Nancy Shalowitz has joined the law school as its new General Counsel and Assistant Dean for Human Resources. She also will serve as Secretary to The John Marshall Law School Board of Trustees. “I’m excited to have Nancy join the law school in this inaugural role. She brings a wealth of experience and I know she will help us move forward on many fronts," said John Marshall Law School Dean Darby Dickerson. Shalowitz has spent much of her career in a general counsel role, overseeing human resources, compliance issues and operations. Most recently, she served as Assistant General Counsel at Lundbeck LLC, a global pharmaceutical company. Shalowitz also comes to John Marshall with experience in higher education, having served as the Director of the Health Law Institute and Graduate Programs at DePaul University College of Law. She also was an adjunct professor there where she developed and taught core courses at the Health Law Institute and in DePaul’s graduate School of Public Service. “For over a century, The John Marshall Law School has been an integral part of Chicago.  I’m pleased to be a part of the continuing legacy and contributions that the law school brings to the legal community,” Shalowitz said. Shalowitz received a JD from DePaul University College of Law in Chicago, an MHA in healthcare administration from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and a BA from Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts. The John Marshall Law School, founded in 1899, is an independent law school located in the heart of Chicago's legal, financial and commercial districts. The 2018 U.S. News & World Report's America's Best Graduate Schools ranks John Marshall's Lawyering Skills Program 5th, its Trial Advocacy Program 13th and its Intellectual Property Law Program 19th in the nation. Since its inception, John Marshall has been a pioneer in legal education and has been guided by a tradition of diversity, innovation, access and opportunity. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/fe1eb0a5-1335-4a40-bd62-36e04244a2a3


BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Outcome Capital, LLC today announced a collaboration with Suffolk University’s Sawyer Business School aimed at providing graduate-level students with real-world exposure to business challenges in the life sciences, health care services and technology sectors. Outcome Capital is a global investment banking firm that provides strategic and transactional expertise to boards and management teams seeking to carve out a path to liquidity or raise growth capital. “Our aim is the help bridge the gap between academia and industry, to better prepare business students for rapid and more effective integration into the business world, and to make Outcome Capital a recognized center of knowledge and creative, strategic thinking,” said Oded Ben-Joseph, Ph.D., Managing Director, Outcome Capital. “We are strongly committed to young talent, and the Sawyer Business School has long recognized that students benefit greatly from getting early, real-world experience as a key part of their education. Our team is passionate about what we do and excited to partner with Suffolk University to pass on to a new generation of business leaders the wealth of knowledge gained over our many years of advising and working closely with companies to enhance corporate value and implement the best path to success.” Students will gain early exposure to life sciences technologies and transactions in a team environment. They will work collaboratively with analysts, vice presidents and senior bankers to develop a clear value proposition and a strategic vision, definition of sector dynamics and paths to liquidity. These graduate students also will assist in building market and revenue models and valuation through comparable value and discounted cash flow models, as well as research various transaction structures. “Since our beginning in 1937, it has been the Sawyer Business School’s mission to help transform our students into effective business professionals through globally focused, hands-on experience with top business leaders and real-life challenges,” said Michael Behnam, PhD, Dean of Graduate Programs and Academic Affairs at the Sawyer Business School in Boston. “We are very pleased to collaborate with the professionals of Outcome Capital to broaden the exposure we can offer our students within these important and growing industry sectors. It is the perfect fit with our redesigned MBA curriculum that focuses on experiential, collaborative learning focused on Boston’s world class clusters in biotech, healthcare, finance and high-tech.” “The Outcome Capital team has gained considerable knowledge through our more than 18 years of advisory, transactional, and hands-on operational experience with middle-market companies,” said Eilon Amir, Vice president, Outcome Capital. “The collaboration with the Sawyer Business School is our first step in our outreach program to build a close relationship with top academic institutions where we can help foster business leadership and support management success.” Outcome Capital is a unique investment banking firm that provides middle-market growth companies in the life sciences, health care services and technology markets with a value-added client-centric approach to merger, acquisition and corporate finance advisory services. The firm utilizes its proven approach to value enhancement by assisting boards and management teams in navigating both the financial and strategic markets and in implementing the best path for success. Outcome Capital’s strength stems from its unique ability to draw on its wide range of operational, strategic and private equity experience, its expertise across the value building life-cycle, and its broad industry relationships. The professionals at Outcome Capital take pride in their ability to help their clients to make well-informed strategic decisions and recognize the full value created by their vision. For more information, visit: http://www.outcomecapital.com. About Suffolk University and the Sawyer Business School Suffolk University, located in historic downtown Boston, with an international campus in Madrid, is a student-centered institution distinguished by excellence in education and scholarship. It offers a wide range of undergraduate and graduate programs in more than 90 areas of study through its Sawyer Business School, College of Arts & Sciences and Law School. The Sawyer Business School prepares students to be successful leaders in business and public service and is career-focused from day one. Students gain business knowledge while building a tool kit for personal success.


News Article | December 12, 2016
Site: news.mit.edu

During January of her junior year at MIT, Caroline Colbert chose to do a winter externship at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Her job was to shadow the radiation oncology staff, including the doctors that care for patients and medical physicists that design radiation treatment plans. Colbert, now a senior in the Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering (NSE), had expected to pursue a career in nuclear power. But after working in a medical environment, she changed her plans.  She stayed at MGH to work on building a model to automate the generation of treatment plans for patients who will undergo a form of radiation therapy called volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The work was so interesting that she is still involved with it and has now decided to pursue a doctoral degree in medical physics, a field that allows her to blend her training in nuclear science and engineering with her interest in medical technologies.  She’s even zoomed in on schools with programs that have accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Graduate Programs so she’ll have the option of having a more direct impact on patients. “I don’t know yet if I’ll be more interested in clinical work, research, or both,” she says. “But my hope is to work in a hospital setting.” Many NSE students and faculty focus on nuclear energy technologies. But, says Colbert, “the department is really supportive of students who want to go into other industries.” It was as a middle school student that Colbert first became interested in engineering. Later, in a chemistry class, a lesson about nuclear decay set her on a path towards nuclear science and engineering. “I thought it was so cool that one element can turn into another,” she says. “You think of elements as the fundamental building blocks of the physical world.” Colbert’s parents, both from the Boston area, had encouraged her to apply to MIT. They also encouraged her towards the medical field. “They loved the idea of me being a doctor, and then when I decided on nuclear engineering, they wanted me to look into medical physics,” she says. “I was trying to make my own way. But when I did look seriously into medical physics, I had to admit that my parents were right.” At MGH, Colbert’s work began with searching for practical ways to improve the generation of VMAT treatment plans. As with another form of radiation therapy called intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the technology focuses radiation doses on the tumor and away from the healthy tissue surrounding it. The more accurate the dosing, the fewer side effects patients have after therapy.  With VMAT, a main challenge is in devising an accurate individualized treatment plan. Each plan is customized specifically to the patient’s anatomy. This design process is well defined for IMRT, which uses a set of intersecting beams to deliver radiation. VMAT also intersects beams but rotates them around the patient. “There are more degrees of freedom, so it should provide more accurate treatment, but it’s also more computationally difficult to optimize an individual treatment plan,” says Colbert. Colbert spent the second half of her junior year developing improved algorithms under the supervision of Michael Young, a medical physics doctoral student at the University of Massachusetts and a research assistant at MGH. The idea was to use existing IMRT plans from anatomically similar patients as a starting point for developing a customized VMAT plan. “We needed to start the optimization algorithm in a place that was already good enough and would only get better from there,” she says.  Her work involved helping to build a database of existing IMRT radiation therapy plans used to treat MGH patients. She then worked on determining the search criteria required to pull the best information from the database to seed a starter plan that is primed for optimization for VMAT. The work drew on Colbert’s side-interest in computer science, which had grown out of a programming course she’d taken during an earlier January session at MIT.  Colbert has continued to work on this project for her senior thesis. She has also worked with Young to document findings from another project in a paper that will appear in the Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics in 2016.  Prior to her work at MGH, Colbert had done a summer internship in the nuclear energy field working on nuclear fuel cycle technologies at the United States Department of Energy. During her explorations of different professional fields, her advisor, Michael Short, assistant professor of nuclear science and engineering, has been a supportive and helpful resource. “The department allows students to craft their own path through nuclear science and engineering,” Colbert says.


News Article | December 12, 2016
Site: news.mit.edu

During January of her junior year at MIT, Caroline Colbert chose to do a winter externship at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Her job was to shadow the radiation oncology staff, including the doctors that care for patients and medical physicists that design radiation treatment plans. Colbert, now a senior in the Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering (NSE), had expected to pursue a career in nuclear power. But after working in a medical environment, she changed her plans. She stayed at MGH to work on building a model to automate the generation of treatment plans for patients who will undergo a form of radiation therapy called volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The work was so interesting that she is still involved with it and has now decided to pursue a doctoral degree in medical physics, a field that allows her to blend her training in nuclear science and engineering with her interest in medical technologies. She’s even zoomed in on schools with programs that have accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Graduate Programs so she’ll have the option of having a more direct impact on patients. “I don’t know yet if I’ll be more interested in clinical work, research, or both,” she says. “But my hope is to work in a hospital setting.” Many NSE students and faculty focus on nuclear energy technologies. But, says Colbert, “the department is really supportive of students who want to go into other industries.” It was as a middle school student that Colbert first became interested in engineering. Later, in a chemistry class, a lesson about nuclear decay set her on a path towards nuclear science and engineering. “I thought it was so cool that one element can turn into another,” she says. “You think of elements as the fundamental building blocks of the physical world.” Colbert’s parents, both from the Boston area, had encouraged her to apply to MIT. They also encouraged her towards the medical field. “They loved the idea of me being a doctor, and then when I decided on nuclear engineering, they wanted me to look into medical physics,” she says. “I was trying to make my own way. But when I did look seriously into medical physics, I had to admit that my parents were right.” At MGH, Colbert’s work began with searching for practical ways to improve the generation of VMAT treatment plans. As with another form of radiation therapy called intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the technology focuses radiation doses on the tumor and away from the healthy tissue surrounding it. The more accurate the dosing, the fewer side effects patients have after therapy. With VMAT, a main challenge is in devising an accurate individualized treatment plan. Each plan is customized specifically to the patient’s anatomy. This design process is well defined for IMRT, which uses a set of intersecting beams to deliver radiation. VMAT also intersects beams but rotates them around the patient. “There are more degrees of freedom, so it should provide more accurate treatment, but it’s also more computationally difficult to optimize an individual treatment plan,” says Colbert. Colbert spent the second half of her junior year developing improved algorithms under the supervision of Michael Young, a medical physics doctoral student at the University of Massachusetts and a research assistant at MGH. The idea was to use existing IMRT plans from anatomically similar patients as a starting point for developing a customized VMAT plan. “We needed to start the optimization algorithm in a place that was already good enough and would only get better from there,” she says. Her work involved helping to build a database of existing IMRT radiation therapy plans used to treat MGH patients. She then worked on determining the search criteria required to pull the best information from the database to seed a starter plan that is primed for optimization for VMAT. The work drew on Colbert’s side-interest in computer science, which had grown out of a programming course she’d taken during an earlier January session at MIT. Colbert has continued to work on this project for her senior thesis. She has also worked with Young to document findings from another project in a paper that will appear in the Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics in 2016. Prior to her work at MGH, Colbert had done a summer internship in the nuclear energy field working on nuclear fuel cycle technologies at the United States Department of Energy. During her explorations of different professional fields, her advisor, Michael Short, assistant professor of nuclear science and engineering, has been a supportive and helpful resource. “The department allows students to craft their own path through nuclear science and engineering,” Colbert says.


News Article | November 21, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Five of the University of South Florida's leading scientific researchers have been named to the new class of Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world's largest and one of its most prestigious scientific societies. Spanning medicine, public health, and technology research, the new group of USF AAAS Fellows are among some of the university's most accomplished faculty members, representing decades of scientific accomplishments and more than 50 patented technologies. The new designations bring the total number of AAAS Fellows among USF's faculty to 61. "The global recognition of the accomplishments and careers of these five stellar scientists says much about the quality and impact of research across the University of South Florida System," said Paul Sanberg, senior vice president for research, innovation and economic development at USF and himself a AAAS Fellow. "These five faculty members are on the leading edge of discovery in areas that have great impact on the daily lives of people everywhere. Their scientific accomplishments have led to better healthcare and more advanced technology that serve humankind in a myriad of ways. We're very proud these individuals are leaders in our community here at USF and among scientists around the world." With this year's new Fellows class, USF again ranks fourth among all organizations worldwide, tied with University of Florida, in the designation of new AAAS Fellows, joining Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, Texas A&M University, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, University of Texas at Austin, and University of Wisconsin-Madison. USF and UF lead Florida universities in new AAAS Fellows selection. Election as a AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. This year 391 members have been awarded this honor by AAAS because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. New Fellows will be presented with an official certificate and a gold and blue rosette pin in February during the 2017 AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston. The tradition of AAAS Fellows began in 1874. The five faculty members from USF are: John H. Adams, Ph.D. Elected AAAS Fellow in the Biological Sciences Section Citation: For pioneering efforts and distinguished contributions in fundamental and translational malaria research, particularly in discoveries to improve antimalarial drugs and vaccines. Adams is a Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Global Health, in the College of Public Health. He also holds joint appointments in the Department of Molecular Medicine and Division of Infectious Disease & International Medicine, and Department of Internal Medicine in the Morsani College of Medicine. He is an internationally recognized scientist who has distinguished himself in the field of malaria research and dedicated his career to finding solutions for one of the leading causes of death and disease throughout the world. Early in his career he identified and characterized the proteins of Plasmodium vivax, one of the five types of malaria parasites that infect humans. He also assisted in the sequencing of the complete genome of Plasmodium falciparum, another human malaria, in 2008, published as a cover story in the journal Nature, which has stimulated new research pathways for potential drug targets and vaccines. He received an $8.5 million grant in 2010 (as PI) from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to lead an interdisciplinary multi-national team to develop new technologies to advance research on Plasmodium vivax. The development of these state of the art genomic and functional tools for both Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax greatly propelled the field of anti-malarial drug discovery and vaccine development. He has published more than 120 articles, and is an inventor on 6 patents. He earned his M.Sc. and Ph.D. at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In addition to AAAS, he is an active member of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), American Society of Parasitologists, American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH), and the Society of Protozoologists. Dmitry B. Goldgof, Ph.D. Elected AAAS Fellow in the Information, Computing, and Communication Section Citation: For distinguished contributions to the fields of computer vision, pattern recognition and biomedical applications, particularly in biomedical image analysis. Goldgof is a Professor in the USF Department of Computer Science & Engineering in the College of Engineering, and the Department of Oncological Sciences in the Morsani College of Medicine, and a Member of the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute. His expertise spans the research areas of computer vision, image analysis, and pattern recognition, with an emphasis in biomedical applications. For example, he developed a system that automatically identifies tumors in human brain MRI scans, and techniques for automated tracking of deformation in cardiac MRIs. These developments have led to faster and more precise evaluations of medical imaging. He has also made significant advances in the area of biometrics and facial analysis for security applications. He holds five patents and published five edited volumes, 20 book chapters, and more than 85 journal articles. In addition to AAAS, he is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and International Association for Pattern Recognition (IAPR); and member of the International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE), Optical Society of America (OSA), Pattern Recognition Society, and Sigma Xi: The Scientific Research Society. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, his M.S. at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and his B.S. from Moscow Forest Engineering Institute, Moscow, Russia. Dennis K. Killinger, Ph.D. Elected AAAS Fellow in the Physics Section Citation: For pioneering contributions in tunable laser spectroscopy and atmospheric remote sensing, especially new techniques for Lidar sensing of global CO2 and environmental trace species. Killinger is a USF Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Physics and Director of the Lidar Remote Sensing Laboratory in the College of Arts and Sciences. He is also President and CEO of SenOptics, Inc., a developer of patented LIF and Lidar sensors. He was one of the early pioneers in the field of laser remote sensing more than 30 years ago, and he is responsible for some of the major advances of this field, such as the understanding of "noise" in these systems, and for developing parameters to determine signal-to-noise ratio, among many other leading contributions. He is a past Member of the National Academy/NRC Committee on Optical Science and Engineering (COSE) to assess the future technology trends in optics and lasers: Harnessing Light; and University Representative to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) Southeastern Science Policy Colloquium. In addition to AAAS, he is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America (OSA) and SPIE; founding member of the National Academy of Inventors; and Senior Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). He has published eight patents and more than 100 papers and book chapters. He earned his doctorate from the University of Michigan, M.S. from DePauw University, and B.A. from the University of Iowa. Charles J. Lockwood, MD, MHCM Elected AAAS Fellow in the Medical Sciences Section Citation: For distinguished contributions to reproductive science particularly discovery of the first biochemical marker of preterm birth, fetal fibronectin, and the molecular mechanisms underlying uterine hemostasis. Lockwood is the Senior Vice President for USF Health and Dean of the Morsani College of Medicine. At USF Health, Lockwood leads the Morsani College of Medicine and the Colleges of Nursing, Public Health and Pharmacy; and the School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences. He also oversees the USF Physicians Group, the faculty group practice of the medical school -- and the largest multispecialty group practice on the West Coast of Florida. He is a Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Public Health at USF. Lockwood is an internationally recognized health care and research leader who earned a Sc.B., magna cum laude, with distinction, from Brown University, his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and his Master of Science in Health Care Management degree from the Harvard School of Public Health. He served his residency in obstetrics and gynecology at Pennsylvania Hospital and his fellowship in maternal-fetal medicine at the Yale-New Haven Hospital. Lockwood is the recipient of multiple research grant awards from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the March of Dimes and other foundations. He has authored 290 peer-reviewed publications and 170 editorials, authored or co-authored three books, and co-edited seven major textbooks. He led a research team that discovered fetal fibronectin, the first biochemical predictor of prematurity. His clinical interests include prevention of recurrent pregnancy loss, preterm delivery and maternal thrombosis, and he maintains an active laboratory at USF Health dedicated to research in these areas. Lockwood is also member of the March of Dimes Board of Trustees. Shyam S. Mohapatra, Ph.D., MBA, FAAAAI, FNAI, FAIMBE Elected AAAS Fellow in the Pharmaceutical Sciences Section Citation: For outstanding contributions in the field of pharmaceutical and health sciences, particularly for pioneering achievements in advancing biomedical nanotechnology for inflammatory diseases. Mohapatra is a Distinguished USF Health Professor; Associate Dean of Graduate Programs and Professor in the College of Pharmacy; Director of Translational Medicine; Distinguished Professor in the Institute for Advanced Discovery & Innovation; and Vice Chair of Research in the Department of Internal Medicine, Morsani College of Medicine. His research on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), atrial natriuretic peptides (ANPs), and Nanoparticle-mediated gene/drug delivery has helped guide the fields of immunology, infectious disease, biotherapeutics and translational medicine. RSV infection is a condition which afflicts primarily infants, but also adults and the elderly. Even 45 years after the discovery of RSV, there is no vaccine or other effective therapy against RSV, however, Mohapatra's research has led to the unraveling of the molecular mechanisms underlying RSV infection and resulting illnesses, and the development of a potential multi-gene vaccine against RSV. He has also pioneered novel treatment approaches for lung cancer, respiratory viral infections, respiratory allergies, and other chronic lung diseases. He also founded the USF Center for Research & Education in Nanobioengineering in 2010. In addition to AAAS, he is a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineers (AIMBE), and American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Clinical Immunology; member of the National Academy of Inventors; and among the inaugural inductees of the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame. He holds 28 patents, and has published nearly 200 articles and book chapters. He earned his Ph.D. from the Australian National University; M.S. from the GB Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, India; and B.S. from Orissa University of Agriculture & Technology, India. This year's AAAS Fellows will be formally announced in the AAAS News & Notes section of the journal Science on Nov. 25. The University of South Florida is a high-impact, global research university dedicated to student success. USF is a Top 25 research university among public institutions nationwide in total research expenditures, according to the National Science Foundation. Serving over 48,000 students, the USF System has an annual budget of $1.6 billion and an annual economic impact of $4.4 billion. USF is a member of the American Athletic Conference. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is the world's largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science as well as Science Translational Medicine, Science Signaling, a digital, open-access journal, Science Advances, Science Immunology, and Science Robotics. AAAS was founded in 1848 and includes nearly 250 affiliated societies and academies of science, serving 10 million individuals. Science has the largest paid circulation of any peer-reviewed general science journal in the world. The non-profit AAAS is open to all and fulfills its mission to "advance science and serve society" through initiatives in science policy, international programs, science education, public engagement, and more. For the latest research news, log onto EurekAlert!, the premier science-news Web site, a service of AAAS. See http://www. .


News Article | August 15, 2016
Site: www.theenergycollective.com

In a totalitarian state, the presence of thousands of anti-nuclear demonstrators in the streets for several days is not only a surprise, it also represents the deep unease people there have about a nuclear energy facility that hasn’t even broken ground. A massive $15 billion effort to build a facility to make MOX fuel was last week the subject of protests involving thousands of people in the city of Lianyungang in Jiangsu Province located about 300 miles (480km) north of Shanghai (YouTube Video). The city is one of six potential sites for the spent fuel reprocessing center to be built in a partnership between China National Nuclear Corp. (CNNC) and Areva. The plant would be built based on the same technology used by Areva at a MOX fuel plant in France. The demonstrators disregarded warnings from the government and police to stop. Protest groups flooded Chinese social media with anti-nuclear slogans. The protests in the streets and online stem from a growing unease over industrial pollution and other environmental issues linked in a part to corrupt practices. The plan for the nuclear reprocessing facility site at this stage involves site selection and no decision has been made yet. Lianyungang city officials short-circuited a response from CNNC by telling the demonstrators they would not allow the plant to be built there. The apparent loss of the site in Lianyungang does not mean the project is on the ropes. There are five other sites in other parts of the country still under consideration. The other sites include locations in the provinces of Shandong, Zhejiang, Fujian, Guangdong, and Gansu. All have existing nuclear facilities and are located at coastal sites. There are two Russian built VVER commercial nuclear reactors at the Tainwan power station in Lianyungang. Two more units are under construction which will be commissioned in 2018 and there are plans on paper to add yet two more units to them. Their presence does not seem to have been a factor in the protests. The protests in Lianyungang occurred on the anniversary of a massive chemical explosion that took place at the Ruihai International Chemical warehouse in the city of Tainjin on August 12, 2015. A reported 173 people were killed and over 800 injured by the blast caused by hundreds of tons of dangerous chemicals illegally stored in the warehouse. The subsequent investigation revealed a complex web of corruption, negligence, lax regulatory oversight, and poor emergency responses services. Cleanup of the site has stalled due to the complex and toxic nature of the residual chemicals and their combustion byproducts. An estimated 470,000 cubic meters of material needs to be removed from the site, but there are few places to put it. This is not the first time protests in China have led to reconsideration of a proposal for a new nuclear facility. In 2013 protests erupted involving over 1,000 peo0ple over plans to build a commercial nuclear fuel plant in Heshan in Guangdong province resulted in the government cancelling that particular site with plans to relocate it. Coincidentally, the nuclear fuel plant that was the subject of these protests includes planned production of commercial fuel assemblies for the VVER units at Lianyungang. The initial plan for the reprocessing plant was first set in motion in 2007 as part of a deal that also resulted in Areva building two 1650 MW EPR reactors in Taishan, China, just west of Hong Kong. Once a site is selected for the reprocessing facility, construction of the 800 tonne per year plant is suppose to start in 2020 and be completed by 2030. Technical details about the plant are more or less complete. During a visit to France in June 2015, China’s premier Li Keqiang called for financial and contractual details to be completed by the end of this year. The La Hague, France, MOX plant, on which the 800 tonne per year Chinese plant will be based, is much larger and is capable of handling 2,700 tonnes per year. As a practical matter, the 800 tonne per year plant is not going to in the short term make a serious dent in the inventory of spent nuclear fuel in China. By 2020 China is expected to have 12,300 tonnes of spent fuel in mostly wet storage though there is some ongoing transition to dry casks. With a service life of about 60 years, the plant could handle at least 40,000-50,000 tonnes of spent fuel. However, China has ambitious plans to build more nuclear power plants which will significantly increase the amount of spent fuel it will have to manage as part of its policy re-using the fuel. Within the first ten years of operation, by 2040, a second reprocessing plant with at least the same capacity would have to be built to handle the load. In the meantime, China may decide to move its spent fuel from wet storage at reactors to an interim site involving dry casks mostly likely located near the first MOX plant. According to the World Nuclear Association, mainland China has 34 nuclear power reactors in operation, 20 under construction, and more about to start construction. Additional reactors are planned, including some of the world’s most advanced, to give a doubling of nuclear capacity to at least 58 GWe by 2020-21, then up to 150 GWe by 2030, and much more by 2050. An English language report published in the South China Morning Post (SCMP) last week indicates that China has an acute shortage of experienced nuclear plant technical staff and that the problem will get worse before it gets better. The SCMP report cites a Chinese language report in China Business News which quotes Prof. Ai Deshang, Dean of Graduate Programs, in the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, at Tsinghua University, who says China will need 30,000 to 40,000 trained nuclear technicians by the end of the 2020s, but that currently the nation’s universities are only capable of graduating a few hundred individuals per year. The China Business News report also quotes He Yu, President of China General Nuclear (CGN) who said that China plans to build over 100 new reactors by 2030 to meet energy needs and to reduce pollution from coal fired power plants. Staffing of there new reactors will required 50,000 to 80,000 trained staff. The extraordinary pressures on existing experienced reactor staffs are also cited in the report indicating that in at least one instance self-reporting of safety incidents were covered up. A March 2015 pump failure at the Yangiiang Nuclear Power Station in Guangdong province was not made public until May 2016. The environmental ministry reportedly cited four operators over the incident. A spokesman for CGN, which owns and operates the plant, said that it only found out about the failed pump during a inspection which took place this year. The power station is composed of four CPR-1000 reactors three of which have been commissioned and a fourth unit that will come online in 2017. Construction of units 5 & 6, which are slated to be the new Hualong One 1000 MW PWRs, is set to start in 2018. The lack of skilled staff may also impact China’s plans to export its nuclear reactors. China has a pending deal with Argentina to build its new Hualong One reactor there and another deal, which is under review in the UK, to build up to three of them at the Bradwell site near London.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

CHICAGO, IL--(Marketwired - February 23, 2017) - The Association of American Law Schools (AALS) is the nation's largest organization for legal education. This year, Professor Mark Wojcik of The John Marshall Law School, is serving as a Chair of an AALS Section for the 10th time. This year Wojcik is chairing the AALS Section on International Legal Exchange, a section that he previously chaired in 1998. The Section promotes communication and understanding by helping to promote foreign educational exchange programs for faculty and law students in the United States and in foreign nations. "Being involved in the AALS allows me to work with law professors from across the country and around the world," said Wojcik, who practiced customs and international trade law before joining John Marshall's faculty in 1992. "I'm grateful for the confidence that my colleagues have in me when they elect me as Chair of an AALS Section." At John Marshall, Wojcik teaches International Law, International Business Transactions, Lawyering Skills, Torts, and Sexual Orientation Law. He has taught and lectured in 11 foreign countries, including at the University of Lucerne in Switzerland, the Free La Faculty of Monterrey in Mexico, Vytautas Magnus University School of Law in Lithuania and the University of Cagliari in Sardinia, Italy. Wojcik chaired the AALS Section on North American Cooperation last year and in 2004-2005 and also has twice chaired the Section on Graduate Programs for Non-U.S. Lawyers. He has chaired the Section on International Human Rights; the Section on International Law; the Section on Legal Writing, Reasoning and Research; and the Section on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity issues. He has also served as an officer of the Section on Art Law and a member of the Executive Committee of the Section on Defamation and Privacy. Wojcik is currently serving as Diversity Officer for the Section of International Law of the ABA. He is President-elect of Scribes-The American Society of Legal Writers. He also served on the governing boards of the Chicago Bar Association and the Illinois State Bar Association. He is the author and co-author of numerous law review articles, book chapters and books, including the first casebook on AIDS Law, the first legal writing text for non-native speakers of English and Illinois Legal Research. Wojcik also founded the Global Legal Skills Conference, an international legal skills conference that has been held in the United States, Costa Rica, Mexico and Italy. The Chicago Bar Foundation presented him with awards for outstanding service to the legal profession and for pro bono service. He was also inducted into the Chicago LGBT Hall of Fame. The John Marshall Law School, founded in 1899, is an independent law school located in the heart of Chicago's legal, financial and commercial districts. The 2017 U.S. News & World Report's America's Best Graduate Schools ranks John Marshall's Lawyering Skills Program 5th, its Trial Advocacy Program 19th and its Intellectual Property Law Program 21st in the nation. Since its inception, John Marshall has been a pioneer in legal education and has been guided by a tradition of diversity, innovation, access and opportunity.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

SR Education Group, a leading education research publisher founded in 2004, has just released a major update to GraduatePrograms.com: the 2017 Top Graduate Schools. This year’s rankings include twenty master’s program rankings, ten online master’s program rankings, and four doctoral program rankings. The methodology for creating the lists involves aggregating feedback from student reviews and ratings submitted on GraduatePrograms.com, which has collected over 57,000 reviews of over 1,600 colleges since 2012. SR Education Group’s 2017 Top Graduate School Rankings depend upon proprietary review data, along with tuition data gathered from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), the primary government entity for gathering and presenting data related to education. The methodology considers student feedback collected via program-specific college reviews on GraduatePrograms.com. The website’s college review form includes questions related to students’ educational experiences and outcomes, and it also asks students to rate their school from one to five on a variety of factors that influence student satisfaction, such as quality of instruction, career advising, networking opportunities, student financial services, and career preparedness. Arizona State University is the most recognized of the top-rated graduate schools, making it on an impressive 17 of the 2017 Top Graduate Programs lists. Twelve of their traditional degree programs ranked among the best, and five of their online programs made the rankings. University of Southern California is also rated highly across a variety of subjects, earning placement on 14 of the lists. Liberty University is the most recognized school for online programs, making nine out of the ten program-specific rankings of the top online graduate schools. “The most useful resource for prospective students is the experience of other students,” said Sung Rhee, CEO of SR Education Group. “With our rankings, we want to provide something more valuable than just a list of the most prestigious colleges, so we’ve compiled thousands of students’ real experiences into accessible online resources available to anyone considering graduate school.” A total of 245 colleges were recognized in SR Education Group’s 2017 Top Graduate School rankings, which list the highest-rated institutions across 23 different subjects. The organization plans to continue collecting and publishing student reviews in order to annually update and expand their rankings of the top graduate schools by program. About SR Education Group Headquartered in Kirkland, WA, SR Education Group was founded in 2004 by CEO Sung Rhee. The company’s mission is to create authoritative online resources for students seeking an online education program that best suits their budget and career aspirations. SR Education Group is passionate about making quality education attainable for everyone and believes that objective information about education, careers, and educational financing should be free and easily accessible. For more information, please visit http://www.sreducationgroup.org/.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

Kent State University's College of Business Administration will hold a Graduate Programs Night from 6-8 p.m. on Wednesday, March 1 in room 306 of the Kent State Student Center.

Loading Graduate Programs collaborators
Loading Graduate Programs collaborators