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News Article | December 9, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Siobhan Roberts, a journalist and biographer based in Toronto, Canada, will receive the 2017 JPBM Communications Award for Expository and Popular Books. The Joint Policy Board for Mathematics (JPBM) represents the American Mathematical Society, the American Statistical Association, the Mathematical Association of America, and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. Presented annually, the JPBM Communications Award recognizes outstanding achievement in communicating about mathematics to non-mathematicians. Siobhan Roberts's first book was "King of Infinite Space---Donald Coxeter, The Man Who Saved Geometry" (Walker and Company, 2006). The book received rave reviews as well as the Euler Book Prize of the Mathematical Association for America, the citation for which says: "[The book] gives a superbly readable account, in personal terms, of the search for beauty that sets mathematics in motion, and of the synergy of individual and group efforts that make it happen. It's an engaging page-turner... [that] honors the spirit of wonder and openness that Coxeter embodied in his approach to mathematics." Roberts also wrote and produced a documentary film about Coxeter, "The Man Who Saved Geometry," for TVOntario's The View From Here. Today she writes for The New Yorker's "Elements," Nautilus, and Quanta. At various times she has contributed to The Guardian, Smithsonian, The New York Times, The Globe and Mail, and The Walrus, among other publications. She is an occasional Director's Visitor at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. Her most recent book is "Genius at Play --- The Curious Mind of John Horton Conway" (Bloomsbury, 2015), written in part while she was a Fellow at the Leon Levy Center for Biography, at the CUNY Graduate Center in New York City. This book too was received to wide acclaim; one example is the Nature review by Michael Harris (Columbia University), which says: "Roberts's 'kaleidoscope of inquiry' is a marvel for its virtuoso juggling of narrative speeds, reminiscences, implausible digressions and long passages of precise, comprehensible mathematics. She packs it all into a tidy chronology framed by the story of a road movie starring Conway... In search of the best ways to talk about numbers, groups, shapes, and games, Roberts has rediscovered the power of talking about the people who dedicate their lives to their study: and what an enjoyable discovery that is." The award will be presented Thursday, January 5, 2017, at the Joint Mathematics Meetings in Atlanta. Find out more about the JPBM Communications Award at http://www. . The Joint Policy Board for Mathematics (JPBM) is a collaborative effort of the American Mathematical Society, the American Statistical Association, the Mathematical Association of America, and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. The JPBM oversees the JPBM Communications Award and Mathematics and Statistics Awareness Month programs. Founded in 1888 to further mathematical research and scholarship, today the American Mathematical Society, http://www. , fulfills its mission through programs and services that promote mathematical research and its uses, strengthen mathematical education, and foster awareness and appreciation of mathematics and its connections to other disciplines and to everyday life. The American Statistical Association, http://www. , is the world's largest community of statisticians and data scientists, the "Big Tent for Statistics." The ASA supports excellence in the development, application, and dissemination of statistical science through meetings, publications, membership services, education, accreditation, and advocacy. The Mathematical Association of America, http://www. , is the world's largest community of mathematicians, students, and enthusiasts. The MAA accelerates the understanding of our world through mathematics. This is because mathematics drives society and shapes our lives. The Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, http://www. , headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is an international society of more than 14,000 individual, academic and corporate members from 85 countries. SIAM helps build cooperation between mathematics and the worlds of science and technology to solve real-world problems through publications, conferences, and communities like chapters, sections and activity groups.


The Center will support a Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality certificate program offered through the Lehman College School of Continuing and Professional Studies IRVINE, CA--(Marketwired - December 21, 2016) - EON Reality Inc., the world leader in Virtual Reality based knowledge transfer for industry, education, and edutainment, and Lehman College, a public, senior college located in the Bronx that is part of the City University of New York (CUNY), today announce the establishment of an Interactive Digital Center (IDC) as part of Lehman College's School of Continuing and Professional Studies. This IDC will support the training of new Virtual and Augmented Reality professionals as well support the development of VR and AR applications that will assist in teaching Lehman's students. The new program will be housed in the College's satellite campus, CUNY on the Concourse. As established industries continue to be disrupted by technological advances, workers who have been displaced will need retraining to find a new trade. The Virtual and Augmented Reality industries are quickly growing and require an infusion of talent to meet the market's demands, which some project to be around $150 billion by 2020. Additionally, EON Reality's seventeen years of experience in using Virtual Reality for training and education will empower Lehman to create VR learning modules to help train workers for other industries. "Lehman College is a perfect partner for EON Reality," said Dan Lejerskar, Chairman of EON Reality. "New York City is a place where our unique combination of training and education can make a difference in people's lives, especially when combined with Lehman College's expertise. Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality lets people learn by doing. This speeds up the entire learning process, improves retention, and helps learners make the right decisions in stressful situations. This technology is perfect for the School of Continuing and Professional Studies in one of the world's most dynamic cities." "This vital partnership with EON Reality, is but one example of how Lehman is cementing its place as the most important, mission-critical senior college of The City University of New York," said José Luis Cruz, President of Lehman College. "This effort will provide invaluable state-of-the-art experiential training to students of our School of Continuing and Professional Studies -- positioning them well for the opportunities of the burgeoning VR/AR industry." The first phase of the IDC is a Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality training facility and development lab, which will train future VR and AR professionals. Students will engage in a yearlong program that involves three months of classroom training followed by seven months of project-based learning that includes project work done for real customers. Additionally, the facility will include an Icube Mobile, a four-wall immersive Virtual Reality room, that will enable the students to experience and test their creations. The IDC will open in the second quarter of 2017 and is now accepting applications. For more information please visit: www.eonreality.com. As CUNY's only senior college in the Bronx, Lehman College enrolls over 13,000 students and offers over 90 undergraduate and graduate degree programs. Lehman is home to 12 CUNY doctoral programs (most in conjunction with the CUNY Graduate Center) and has a long-standing collaboration with the New York Botanical Garden. Lehman is a Hispanic-Serving Institution where 91 languages are spoken and students hail from 142 different ancestries; nearly 40 percent of students hold two passports. In recent years Lehman students have won Fulbrights scholarships, National Science Foundation awards, and fellowships from the George P. Soros and Jeannette K. Watson foundations, as well as the Organization of American States. In 2015, Washington Monthly selected Lehman as the No. 3 "Best Bang for the Buck" college in the Northeast. Its tree-lined, 37-acre campus once housed the United Nations Security Council, where in 1946 diplomats drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. EON Reality is the world leader in Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) based knowledge transfer for industry, education, and edutainment. EON Reality's success is tied to its belief that knowledge is a human right and should be available, accessible, and affordable for every human on the planet. To carry this out, EON Reality, since 1999, has developed the de-facto standard for Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality based knowledge transfer software that supports devices from mobile phones to large immersive domes. EON Reality's global app development network, with twenty-two locations worldwide, has created the world's leading AR/VR library for knowledge transfer with over 7,000 applications. Over 36 million people worldwide have downloaded these applications. For further information, visit www.eonreality.com.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

New DNA-based research provides compelling evidence that a group of strange-looking fish living near the mouth of the Congo River are evolving due to the intense hydraulics of the river's rapids and deep canyons. The study, led by scientists at the American Museum of Natural History, the City University of New York, and Fordham University, reveals that fishes in this part of the river live in "neighborhoods" that are separated from one another by the waters' turbulent flow. In some cases, the researchers found that fishes living less than a mile away from their relatives are actually exchanging very few genes. Many represent distinct species, according to the new study now out in the journal Molecular Ecology. "In this very short section of the Congo, we find a tremendous diversity of fishes," said Melanie Stiassny, Axelrod Research Curator in the Museum's Department of Ichthyology and an author on the study. "We also know that this part of the river is relatively young, originating only about 3 to 5 million years ago. So what is it about this system that makes it such a pump for species?" For the last 10 years, Stiassny and her colleagues, including hydrologists and geologists, have studied the lower Congo River -- the final 200-mile stretch of the freshwater river before it empties into the Atlantic Ocean. Exceptional in depth, speed, and turbulence, the lower Congo is home to the world's most extreme rapids. The region is also remarkable for its biodiversity; scientists have identified more than 300 species of fish living there. That diversity has long seemed puzzling to scientists because the lower Congo appeared to lack physical barriers which, if difficult to traverse, are understood to drive speciation by preventing animals from either side from breeding. Over time, this causes each group to develop separately. The new study, which focuses on a group of freshwater, rock-dwelling cichlid fishes of the genus Teleogramma, adds weight to a theory long proposed by Stiassny and other experts: that the dynamic forces of the river itself are acting like barriers, generating diversity by isolating certain fishes from others for so long that their populations travel down different evolutionary paths. "The genetic separation between these fishes show that the rapids are working as strong barriers, keeping them apart," said lead author Elizabeth Alter, from The City University of New York's Graduate Center and York College. "What's particularly unique about the lower Congo is that this diversification is happening over extremely small spatial scales, over distances as small as 1.5 kilometers. There is no other river like it." The researchers analyzed the genomes of more than 50 individual fishes representing each of the different Teleogramma populations found in the lower Congo. They found that their species ranges correspond to geographic regions broadly separated by major hydrological and topographic barriers, indicating that these features are likely important drivers of diversification. The authors also note that there are important conservation implications to this work: about 25 percent of the fish in the lower Congo are endemic, or only found in this particular location. But the area is currently being proposed as a site for major dam development. "Activity like that would majorly interrupt the evolutionary potential of this system," Stiassny said. Jason Munshi-South, from Fordham University, was also an author on this paper. The American Museum of Natural History, founded in 1869, is one of the world's preeminent scientific, educational, and cultural institutions. The Museum encompasses 45 permanent exhibition halls, including those in the Rose Center for Earth and Space and the Hayden Planetarium, as well as galleries for temporary exhibitions. It is home to New York State's official memorial to Theodore Roosevelt, a tribute to Roosevelt's enduring legacy of environmental conservation. The Museum's approximately 200 scientists draw on a world-class research collection of more than 33 million artifacts and specimens, some of which are billions of years old, and on one of the largest natural history libraries in the world. Through its Richard Gilder Graduate School, the Museum grants the Ph.D. degree in Comparative Biology and the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) degree, the only such program at any museum in the United States. Annual physical attendance has grown to approximately 5 million, and the Museum's exhibitions and Space Shows can be seen in venues on six continents. The Museum's website, digital videos, and apps for mobile devices bring its collections, exhibitions, and educational programs to millions more around the world. Visit amnh.org for more information. Become a fan of the Museum on Facebook at facebook.com/naturalhistory, and follow us on Instagram at @AMNH, Tumblr at amnhnyc, or Twitter at twitter.com/AMNH.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

New DNA-based research provides compelling evidence that a group of strange-looking fish living near the mouth of the Congo River are evolving due to the intense hydraulics of the river's rapids and deep canyons. The study, led by scientists at the American Museum of Natural History, the City University of New York, and Fordham University, reveals that fishes in this part of the river live in "neighborhoods" that are separated from one another by the waters' turbulent flow. In some cases, the researchers found that fishes living less than a mile away from their relatives are actually exchanging very few genes. Many represent distinct species, according to the new study now out in the journal Molecular Ecology. "In this very short section of the Congo, we find a tremendous diversity of fishes," said Melanie Stiassny, Axelrod Research Curator in the Museum's Department of Ichthyology and an author on the study. "We also know that this part of the river is relatively young, originating only about 3 to 5 million years ago. So what is it about this system that makes it such a pump for species?" For the last 10 years, Stiassny and her colleagues, including hydrologists and geologists, have studied the lower Congo River -- the final 200-mile stretch of the freshwater river before it empties into the Atlantic Ocean. Exceptional in depth, speed, and turbulence, the lower Congo is home to the world's most extreme rapids. The region is also remarkable for its biodiversity; scientists have identified more than 300 species of fish living there. That diversity has long seemed puzzling to scientists because the lower Congo appeared to lack physical barriers which, if difficult to traverse, are understood to drive speciation by preventing animals from either side from breeding. Over time, this causes each group to develop separately. The new study, which focuses on a group of freshwater, rock-dwelling cichlid fishes of the genus Teleogramma, adds weight to a theory long proposed by Stiassny and other experts: that the dynamic forces of the river itself are acting like barriers, generating diversity by isolating certain fishes from others for so long that their populations travel down different evolutionary paths. "The genetic separation between these fishes show that the rapids are working as strong barriers, keeping them apart," said lead author Elizabeth Alter, from The City University of New York's Graduate Center and York College. "What's particularly unique about the lower Congo is that this diversification is happening over extremely small spatial scales, over distances as small as 1.5 kilometers. There is no other river like it." The researchers analyzed the genomes of more than 50 individual fishes representing each of the different Teleogramma populations found in the lower Congo. They found that their species ranges correspond to geographic regions broadly separated by major hydrological and topographic barriers, indicating that these features are likely important drivers of diversification. The authors also note that there are important conservation implications to this work: about 25 percent of the fish in the lower Congo are endemic, or only found in this particular location. But the area is currently being proposed as a site for major dam development. "Activity like that would majorly interrupt the evolutionary potential of this system," Stiassny said. Jason Munshi-South, from Fordham University, was also an author on this paper.


News Article | February 18, 2017
Site: phys.org

A pair of aquarium-held cichlids of the species Telegramma brichardi. Credit: Oliver Lucanus New DNA-based research provides compelling evidence that a group of strange-looking fish living near the mouth of the Congo River are evolving due to the intense hydraulics of the river's rapids and deep canyons. The study, led by scientists at the American Museum of Natural History, the City University of New York, and Fordham University, reveals that fishes in this part of the river live in "neighborhoods" that are separated from one another by the waters' turbulent flow. In some cases, the researchers found that fishes living less than a mile away from their relatives are actually exchanging very few genes. Many represent distinct species, according to the new study now out in the journal Molecular Ecology. "In this very short section of the Congo, we find a tremendous diversity of fishes," said Melanie Stiassny, Axelrod Research Curator in the Museum's Department of Ichthyology and an author on the study. "We also know that this part of the river is relatively young, originating only about 3 to 5 million years ago. So what is it about this system that makes it such a pump for species?" For the last 10 years, Stiassny and her colleagues, including hydrologists and geologists, have studied the lower Congo River—the final 200-mile stretch of the freshwater river before it empties into the Atlantic Ocean. Exceptional in depth, speed, and turbulence, the lower Congo is home to the world's most extreme rapids. The region is also remarkable for its biodiversity; scientists have identified more than 300 species of fish living there. That diversity has long seemed puzzling to scientists because the lower Congo appeared to lack physical barriers which, if difficult to traverse, are understood to drive speciation by preventing animals from either side from breeding. Over time, this causes each group to develop separately. The new study, which focuses on a group of freshwater, rock-dwelling cichlid fishes of the genus Teleogramma, adds weight to a theory long proposed by Stiassny and other experts: that the dynamic forces of the river itself are acting like barriers, generating diversity by isolating certain fishes from others for so long that their populations travel down different evolutionary paths. "The genetic separation between these fishes show that the rapids are working as strong barriers, keeping them apart," said lead author Elizabeth Alter, from The City University of New York's Graduate Center and York College. "What's particularly unique about the lower Congo is that this diversification is happening over extremely small spatial scales, over distances as small as 1.5 kilometers. There is no other river like it." The researchers analyzed the genomes of more than 50 individual fishes representing each of the different Teleogramma populations found in the lower Congo. They found that their species ranges correspond to geographic regions broadly separated by major hydrological and topographic barriers, indicating that these features are likely important drivers of diversification. The authors also note that there are important conservation implications to this work: about 25 percent of the fish in the lower Congo are endemic, or only found in this particular location. But the area is currently being proposed as a site for major dam development. "Activity like that would majorly interrupt the evolutionary potential of this system," Stiassny said. Jason Munshi-South, from Fordham University, was also an author on this paper. Explore further: Name of new weakly electric fish species reflects hope for peace in Central Africa More information: S. Elizabeth Alter et al, Genomewide SNP data reveal cryptic phylogeographic structure and microallopatric divergence in a rapids-adapted clade of cichlids from the Congo River, Molecular Ecology (2017). DOI: 10.1111/mec.13973


Home > Press > NYU Tandon researcher synthesizes hybrid molecule that delivers a blow to malignant cells: Protein-gold nanoparticle hybrid assembles to carry anti-cancer drug, then disassembles for delivery Abstract: A new hybrid molecule developed in the lab at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering shows promise for treating breast cancer by serving as a "shipping container" for cytotoxic -- or cell-destroying -- chemotherapeutic agents. The protein/polymer-gold nanoparticle (P-GNP) composite can load up with these drugs, carry them to malignant cells, and unload them where they can do the most damage with the least amount of harm to the patient. The hybrid molecule enhances small-molecule loading, sustained release, and increased uptake in breast cancer cells. It is also relatively easy to synthesize. It was developed by Jin Kim Montclare--an associate professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at NYU Tandon and an affiliate professor of Chemistry at NYU and Biochemistry at SUNY Downstate--along with collaborators at the Department of Biology at Brooklyn College and Graduate Center of the City University of New York. Montclare explained that these abilities make the P-GNP vehicle unique among hybrids. "The protein component has been exclusively developed in our lab; no one else has made such constructs," she said. These protein polymers possess the unique ability to self-assemble in a temperature-sensitive manner while also exhibiting the ability to encapsulate small molecules. As published in the Journal of Nanomedicine & Nanotechnology, the team performed tests with in vitro samples of the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line, using the anti-inflammatory compound curcumin, shown experimentally to inhibit cancer cell growth when applied directly to a tumor, as the chemotherapy agent. When compared to the protein polymers alone, the P-GNP hybrid demonstrated a greater than seven-fold increase in curcumin binding, a nearly 50 percent slower release profile, and more than two-fold increase in cellular uptake of curcumin. This is an important achievement, given the difficulty in delivering chemotherapeutic compounds to their targets because such agents tend to be hydrophobic, meaning they don't dissolve easily in water. And the more potent they are, the more hydrophobic they tend to be, said Montclare, who recently received the "Rising Star Award" from the American Chemical Society's Women Chemist Committee. "The P-GNPs are able to solubilize the hydrophobic small molecule through both the protein domain itself, and the gold nanoparticles. Thus, P-GNP can carry higher payloads, enabling it to deliver more drug," she said. She also found an easier way to build these hybrid molecules. Most literature describes a process involving high temperatures and pressures, and harsh chemistry. But Montclare is able to synthesize P-GNP in one operation thanks to histidine tags, which, she said, are "responsible for 'templating' the GNPs, making the synthesis a possibility under ambient temperature and pressure. So we do it all at once because the protein itself crystallizes the gold right from a solution of gold salts to generate GNP right on the end of the protein polymer." The next step is to observe efficacy by injecting P-GNP complexes directly into a variety of mouse cancer models. Montclare said human testing of P-GNP is still years away. ### Outside funding support was provided by the National Science Foundation, Shiffrin Meyer Breast Cancer Discovery Fund, and the National Institute of Health's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences. About NYU Tandon School of Engineering The NYU Tandon School of Engineering dates to 1854, when the NYU School of Civil Engineering and Architecture as well as the Brooklyn Collegiate and Polytechnic Institute (widely known as Brooklyn Poly) were founded. Their successor institutions merged in January 2014 to create a comprehensive school of education and research in engineering and applied sciences, rooted in a tradition of invention, innovation and entrepreneurship. In addition to programs at its main campus in downtown Brooklyn, it is closely connected to engineering programs in NYU Abu Dhabi and NYU Shanghai, and it operates business incubators in downtown Manhattan and Brooklyn. For more information, visit engineering.nyu.edu. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


American Jewish University (AJU) is pleased to announce Mrs. Virginia A. Maas has been appointed Chairperson of the AJU Board of Trustees. Mrs. Maas is well-known and valued leader in the wider Los Angeles Jewish community, serving on numerous nonprofit organizations in a variety of capacities. Los Angeles, CA, November 07, 2016 --( An active and dedicated AJU board member since 1986, Mrs. Maas has previously served American Jewish University as the Past Chair of the Academic Affairs Committee, Member of the Budget and Finance Committee, Co-Chair of the Graduate Center for Jewish Education Advisory Board, Chair of the Miller Introduction to Judaism Advisory Board, Past Chair of the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies Advisory Board, Past Chair of the Whizin Center for Continuing Education Advisory Board and Past Chair of the Patrons Society. “Virginia brings to the position of AJU board chair more than 40 years of leadership experience both within the Jewish community and beyond,” said AJU President, Dr. Robert Wexler. “We could not ask for a better leader for our board of directors as AJU celebrates its 70th anniversary.” Mrs. Maas is well-known and valued leader in the wider Los Angeles Jewish community, serving on numerous nonprofit organizations in a variety of capacities. In addition to her role on the AJU Board, she is also a longtime board member of the Jewish Federation Council (1986-present), Friends of Beverly Hills Library, and Beit T’Shuvah (1998-present). She is also the current Secretary and Board Member for the Jewish Community Center Development Corp. of Los Angeles (2002-present). Previously Mrs. Maas has served the community as President and Board Member for the Beverly Hills Board of Education, Board Member, Jewish Community Centers Association National Board, Past President, Metropolitan Region of the Jewish Federation Council, Past President, Westside Jewish Community Center, Past President, Jewish Community Center of Greater Los Angeles and Former Co-Chair, Hispanic/Jewish Dialogue of the Jewish Federation Council. Virginia A. Maas holds both a Bachelors and Master’s degree in English Literature from UCLA. She is married to Francis S. Maas and they enjoy their children (Monique & Bradley Gibbons and Michael & Theresa Maas) as well as their two grandchildren Barry and Emilie. Active members of Hillcrest Country Club since 2008, Mrs. Maas has served as Chair, Women’s Golf Auxiliary Board, Co-Captain, Hillcrest Women’s Golf Team, and Tournament Chair, Women’s Golf Auxiliary Board. Regarding her AJU appointment, Mrs. Maas said, “I am so pleased to be appointed Chair of the AJU Board of Trustees. AJU’s focus on scholarship, culture, ethics, leadership, and peoplehood are very much in line with my own personal values which have inspired my work in our community for over four decades. As a longtime member of the AJU board, I look forward to continuing to serve the university community in this new leadership capacity as we move forward one of the largest and most innovative Jewish institutions in the country.” Virginia A. Maas has been appointed to a two year term and succeeds immediate past chair, Mr. Kevin Ratner, whose term ended in June 2016. Los Angeles, CA, November 07, 2016 --( PR.com )-- American Jewish University (AJU) is pleased to announce Mrs. Virginia A. Maas has been appointed Chairperson of the AJU Board of Trustees.An active and dedicated AJU board member since 1986, Mrs. Maas has previously served American Jewish University as the Past Chair of the Academic Affairs Committee, Member of the Budget and Finance Committee, Co-Chair of the Graduate Center for Jewish Education Advisory Board, Chair of the Miller Introduction to Judaism Advisory Board, Past Chair of the Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies Advisory Board, Past Chair of the Whizin Center for Continuing Education Advisory Board and Past Chair of the Patrons Society.“Virginia brings to the position of AJU board chair more than 40 years of leadership experience both within the Jewish community and beyond,” said AJU President, Dr. Robert Wexler. “We could not ask for a better leader for our board of directors as AJU celebrates its 70th anniversary.”Mrs. Maas is well-known and valued leader in the wider Los Angeles Jewish community, serving on numerous nonprofit organizations in a variety of capacities. In addition to her role on the AJU Board, she is also a longtime board member of the Jewish Federation Council (1986-present), Friends of Beverly Hills Library, and Beit T’Shuvah (1998-present). She is also the current Secretary and Board Member for the Jewish Community Center Development Corp. of Los Angeles (2002-present). Previously Mrs. Maas has served the community as President and Board Member for the Beverly Hills Board of Education, Board Member, Jewish Community Centers Association National Board, Past President, Metropolitan Region of the Jewish Federation Council, Past President, Westside Jewish Community Center, Past President, Jewish Community Center of Greater Los Angeles and Former Co-Chair, Hispanic/Jewish Dialogue of the Jewish Federation Council.Virginia A. Maas holds both a Bachelors and Master’s degree in English Literature from UCLA. She is married to Francis S. Maas and they enjoy their children (Monique & Bradley Gibbons and Michael & Theresa Maas) as well as their two grandchildren Barry and Emilie. Active members of Hillcrest Country Club since 2008, Mrs. Maas has served as Chair, Women’s Golf Auxiliary Board, Co-Captain, Hillcrest Women’s Golf Team, and Tournament Chair, Women’s Golf Auxiliary Board.Regarding her AJU appointment, Mrs. Maas said, “I am so pleased to be appointed Chair of the AJU Board of Trustees. AJU’s focus on scholarship, culture, ethics, leadership, and peoplehood are very much in line with my own personal values which have inspired my work in our community for over four decades. As a longtime member of the AJU board, I look forward to continuing to serve the university community in this new leadership capacity as we move forward one of the largest and most innovative Jewish institutions in the country.”Virginia A. Maas has been appointed to a two year term and succeeds immediate past chair, Mr. Kevin Ratner, whose term ended in June 2016.


News Article | March 15, 2016
Site: www.nanotech-now.com

Abstract: Reducing a barrier that generally hinders the easy generation of new molecules, a team led by City College of New York chemist Mahesh K. Lakshman has devised a method to cleave generally inert bonds to allow the formation of new ones. The study is the cover story in the journal ACS Catalysis published by the American Chemical Society. "Saturated carbon-hydrogen bonds in organic compounds are considered relatively inert and generally difficult to break in order to make other bonds, leading to new molecules," explained Lakshman, professor of chemistry in City College's Division of Science. However, Lakshman and his colleagues demonstrated a method for accomplishing cleavage of carbon-hydrogen bonds and subsequent formation of carbon-nitrogen bonds. Many of the ensuing new molecules bear structural similarities to the class of dideoxynucleosides, which are used as antiviral drugs. "Thus, this research can provide more direct access to novel pharmaceutical entities," said Lakshman, whose research thrust is organic synthesis at the chemistry-biology interface. ### His research team included fellow chemists Manish K. Singh (CCNY and the Graduate Center, CUNY, now a postdoctoral associate at UNC, Chapel Hill), Hari K. Akula (CCNY, the Graduate Center, Ph.D. student), Sakilam Satishkumar (CCNY, postdoctoral associate) and Dr. Lothar Stahl (University of North Dakota). About City College of New York Since 1847, The City College of New York has provided low-cost, high-quality education for New Yorkers in a wide variety of disciplines. More than 15,000 students pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees in the College of Liberal Arts and Science; Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture; School of Education; Grove School of Engineering; Sophie Davis Biomedical Education/CUNY School of Medicine; and the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership. U.S. News, Princeton Review and Forbes all rank City College among the best colleges and universities in the United States. For more information, please click If you have a comment, please us. Issuers of news releases, not 7th Wave, Inc. or Nanotechnology Now, are solely responsible for the accuracy of the content.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

A new clinical study conducted by Evelyn Ramirez-Coombs, CUNY Graduate Center, and Bittylab is giving parents and pediatricians a non-drug option when treating infant acid reflux. The study found that after a two-week trial using the Bare Air-Free baby bottle 75% of infants no longer had symptoms of acid reflux, and there was a 52% reduction in their GER score. Acid reflux, also known as gastroesophageal reflux (GER) affects two-thirds of 4-month olds, yet there has never been a proven method to reduce or eliminate its symptoms. Desperate parents often turn to pediatricians who will prescribe acid reflux medications (also known as proton pump inhibitors) to babies more than four months old even though there is no research to show medications are effective in normally-developing infants. According to Eric Hassall, a pediatric gastroenterologist from Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation in San Francisco, “There is no science that backs using proton pump inhibitors for infants, but there is ‘GERD mania.’ The largest clinical trial in infants found that a proton pump inhibitor was no better than placebo.” The Bare Air-Free baby bottle design was inspired by a mother’s breast as it only dispenses air-free milk upon suction. This innovative air-free technology is now clinically proven to eliminate reflux symptoms, gas and colic due to the following: Air-Free Milk: The unique syringe-like design dispenses air-free milk to prevent gas buildup. Upright Feeding: Bare doesn’t have to be turned upside down like other bottles, which allows baby to feed in an upright position to reduce regurgitation of stomach acids. Baby-Controlled Flow: The ability for baby to control the flow and pace of feeding with suction-flow – not gravity-flow – to help prevent overfeeding. “We were inspired to conduct this study after receiving feedback from multiple parents about how our product helped manage their infant’s acid reflux,” says Priska Diaz, mom and founder of Bittylab, makers of Bare Air-Free baby bottle. “I’m so glad we are finally able to offer a solution with scientific evidence for infants (and parents) seeking relief from acid reflux and we look forward to advancing this research.” The study tracked changes in GER symptoms in 122 infants over a two-week period using the Bare Air-Free feeding system exclusively. The infants were divided into two groups. The GER group was defined as infants with clinically significant ratings of GER symptoms based on the Infant- GER Questionnaire (I-GERQ), an empirically validated measure for infant presentation of GER, used by both researchers and clinicians. A sample of infants with typical GI functioning were also recruited and placed in the control group. After a two-week trial of using Bare Air-Free, parents reported significant decreases in GER symptoms via the same I-GERQ. Approximately 75% of babies in the high GER group no longer met clinical criteria for GER, and showed a 52% reduction in symptoms. Furthermore, the data revealed that even control group babies saw a 49% reduction in GI discomfort after using Bare. Overall, Bare Air-Free was found to be effective in reducing clinical symptoms of GER in infants, and is found to be beneficial for GI/feeding discomfort in typical babies as well. For more information about Bare Air-Free and the study findings, go to Bittylab.com. The Bare Air-Free feeding system is available at Bittylab.com, Babies "R" Us, Walmart.com and Amazon. About Bittylab Bittylab was founded in 2010 by Priska Diaz after struggling with her son’s feeding challenges. A designer by trade, Diaz was determined to eliminate the increased gassiness common among bottle-fed babies and developed a baby bottle that eliminates air swallowed while helping with breastfeeding. Based on her own personal insight “my breasts don’t have air vents, why should baby bottles?,” Bittylab introduced the Bare Air-Free feeding system for infants who suffer gas, colic and GERD.


News Article | March 17, 2016
Site: www.treehugger.com

"Stories of octopuses’ remarkable ability to solve puzzles, open bottles, and interact with aquarium caretakers, suggest an affinity between their intelligence and our own," writes Regan Penaluna for the science magazine Nautilus. Penaluna was musing upon the philosophy of cephalopods after considering an octopus at a local Italian market. “To eat the tentacle would be, in a way, like eating a brain – the eight arms of an octopus contain two-thirds of its half billion neurons," she writes. "Delicious for some, yes – but for others, a jumping off point for the philosophical question of other minds.” And so she did what any curious science writer would do, she interviewed a philosopher. Enter Peter Godfrey-Smith, a professor of philosophy at CUNY Graduate Center, who for years has been fascinated by what goes on in the brains of cephalopods. “I do think it feels like something to be an octopus,” Godfrey-Smith says. And indeed, why not? Cephalopods have the largest nervous systems of all invertebrates, aside from that fact that they are clearly magicians. Like I wrote last year when musing on how badass octopuses are: "We humans think we’re so fancy with our opposable thumbs and capacity for complex thought. But imagine life as an octopus … camera-like eyes, camouflage tricks worthy of Harry Potter, and not two but eight arms – that happen to be decked out with suckers that possess the sense of taste. And not only that, but those arms? They can execute cognitive tasks even when dismembered. And on top of all that razzmatazz, octocpuses have brains clever enough to navigate super complicated mazes and open jars filled with treats." So Penaluna and Godfrey-Smith got down to business and had a fascinating conversation about what it feels like to be an octopus, in which things like this are revealed: And so much more! It's a great read and I will now send you away from TreeHugger to enjoy the whole interview at Nautilus: What It Feels Like to Be an Octopus. And if you're a cephalopod lover like I am, know that Godfrey-Smith has a book coming out titled Other Minds: The Octopus, the Sea, and the Deep Origins of Consciousness. “I think cephalopods have a special kind of otherness, because they are organized so differently from us and diverged evolutionarily from our line so long ago,” Godfrey-Smith says. “If they do have minds, theirs are the most other minds of all.”

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