Whitehorse, Canada
Whitehorse, Canada

Time filter

Source Type

News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

WHITEHORSE, YUKON--(Marketwired - April 27, 2017) - Habitat for Humanity Yukon will receive funding support from the governments of Canada and Yukon to initiate work on two 4-plexes for eight low income families in Whitehorse. Habitat for Humanity Yukon has entered into a unique agreement with the Chu Níikwän Development Corporation to purchase a lot in the Whistle Bend subdivision in Whitehorse. The federal and territorial government support will allow for the purchase of the land and to begin the first phase of the project. It is anticipated that the first four homes will be ready in 2018 and the second four homes in 2020. "This investment will be making a real difference in this community and the lives of eight families who will call these 4-plexes home. Our Government remains committed to working with our partners to develop and implement solutions to housing both in Yukon and across Canada." - Larry Bagnell, Member of Parliament for Yukon, on behalf of the Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, Minister of Families, Children and Social Development and Minister Responsible for Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation "We know that safe, adequate housing is a key component to healthy communities. The partnership between Habitat for Humanity Yukon and Government of Yukon exemplifies how government and community organizations can work together to improve the availability of affordable housing in Yukon." "Habitat for Humanity strongly believes that families can build strength, stability and self-reliance through affordable homeownership. We are very pleased to partner with Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Yukon Housing Corporation and the Chu Níikwän Development Corporation on this exciting venture."


Metcalfe J.Z.,University of Western Ontario | Longstaffe F.J.,University of Western Ontario | Jass C.N.,Quaternary Palaeontology Program | Zazula G.D.,Government of Yukon | Keddie G.,Royal British Columbia Museum
Journal of Quaternary Science | Year: 2016

We investigated the application of stable isotope analysis of proboscidean remains (collagen in bone/dentin/cementum and structural carbonate in enamel bioapatite) for genus-level identification of isolated specimens, assessment of geographical origins, and testing for nutritional stress. Mammoths (Mammuthus sp.) tended to have higher δ15Ncol and lower δ13Ccol than mastodons (Mammut americanum), but differences were not significant in every location. Determining the genus of isolated specimens may be possible for locations and time periods with good isotopic baselines, but environmental changes can confound interpretations. For example, an Alberta proboscidean with a δ15Ncol of +1.4‰ (characteristic of mastodons) ultimately proved to be a mammoth. Its surprisingly low nitrogen isotope composition is attributable to the recently deglaciated environment it inhabited. We provided a baseline for isotopic assessment of geographical origins of isolated proboscideans in Western Canada. Bioapatite δ13Csc and δ18Osc can be used to distinguish specimens from Alberta, Klondike, Old Crow, Herschel Island and further south (e.g. Arizona, Great Lakes). Finally, we found that an Alberta mammoth with morphological evidence of nutritional stress experienced a change in diet, environment or physiology before death, but its isotopic compositions did not suggest a link to hypothesized starvation (catabolism of proteins or reliance on lipids). © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.


Vavrek M.J.,Royal Ontario Museum | Evans D.C.,Royal Ontario Museum | Braman D.R.,Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology | Campione N.E.,Royal Ontario Museum | Zazula G.D.,Government of Yukon
Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences | Year: 2012

Palaeontological exploration of the Bonnet Plume Basin in northwestern Yukon Territory, Canada, has revealed a Late Paleocene to Early Eocene macrofloral assemblage from a channel fill deposit. The flora is typified by cosmopolitan taxa and dominated by deciduous angiosperms, with the notable presence of Zizyphoides, Ettingshausenia, and Corylites. Floras with a similar composition are known from Late Cretaceous through Early Eocene deposits in Alaska and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, where they have been interpreted as evidence for warm, equable temperatures. This collection represents the most diverse known Paleogene plant macrofossil assemblage from the Yukon Territory and helps to expand our knowledge of ancient high-latitude floras.


Alix C.,University of Paris Pantheon Sorbonne | Hare P.G.,Government of Yukon | Andrews T.D.,Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Center | MacKay G.,Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Center
Arctic | Year: 2012

Discussions of the development of past hunting equipment generally focus on lithic and bone projectile points and foreshafts, as these are often the only elements remaining in archaeological sites. In the last 15 years, the archaeology of alpine ice patches has provided a unique opportunity to analyze hunting equipment over time and gain knowledge of the wooden elements on which the points are hafted. This paper describes the wood and morphometrical analysis of a collection of 27 arrow shafts from two ice patch regions of the western Canadian Subarctic. In both regions, two main categories of arrow shafts show the selection of specific pieces of wood, spruce (Picea sp.) on the one hand and birch (Betula sp.) on the other, with associated morphometrical characteristics. These shafts also share some characteristics that are distinct from those of Arctic and coastal arrow shafts. Shafts of pine (Pinus sp. sec. ponderosa) and hemlock (Tsuga sp.) were also identified in the southwestern Yukon Territory. The absence of correlation between the arrow shaft types and 14C dating raises the question of the significance of the arrow types and the potential for function, trade, or travel to explain the variation. © The Arctic Institute of North America.


Schwartz-Narbonne R.,University of Western Ontario | Longstaffe F.J.,University of Western Ontario | Metcalfe J.Z.,University of British Columbia | Zazula G.,Government of Yukon
Scientific Reports | Year: 2015

Understanding woolly mammoth ecology is key to understanding Pleistocene community dynamics and evaluating the roles of human hunting and climate change in late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions. Previous isotopic studies of mammoths' diet and physiology have been hampered by the 'mammoth conundrum': woolly mammoths have anomalously high collagen δ15N values, which are more similar to coeval carnivores than herbivores, and which could imply a distinct diet and (or) habitat, or a physiological adaptation. We analyzed individual amino acids from collagen of adult woolly mammoths and coeval species, and discovered greater 15N enrichment in source amino acids of woolly mammoths than in most other herbivores or carnivores. Woolly mammoths consumed an isotopically distinct food source, reflective of extreme aridity, dung fertilization, and (or) plant selection. This dietary signal suggests that woolly mammoths occupied a distinct habitat or forage niche relative to other Pleistocene herbivores. © 2015, Nature Publishing Group. All rights reserved.


PubMed | University of Western Ontario, University of British Columbia and Government of Yukon
Type: | Journal: Scientific reports | Year: 2015

Understanding woolly mammoth ecology is key to understanding Pleistocene community dynamics and evaluating the roles of human hunting and climate change in late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions. Previous isotopic studies of mammoths diet and physiology have been hampered by the mammoth conundrum: woolly mammoths have anomalously high collagen (15)N values, which are more similar to coeval carnivores than herbivores, and which could imply a distinct diet and (or) habitat, or a physiological adaptation. We analyzed individual amino acids from collagen of adult woolly mammoths and coeval species, and discovered greater (15)N enrichment in source amino acids of woolly mammoths than in most other herbivores or carnivores. Woolly mammoths consumed an isotopically distinct food source, reflective of extreme aridity, dung fertilization, and (or) plant selection. This dietary signal suggests that woolly mammoths occupied a distinct habitat or forage niche relative to other Pleistocene herbivores.


Orlando L.,Copenhagen University | Ginolhac A.,Copenhagen University | Raghavan M.,Copenhagen University | Vilstrup J.,Copenhagen University | And 13 more authors.
Genome Research | Year: 2011

Second-generation sequencing platforms have revolutionized the field of ancient DNA, opening access to complete genomes of past individuals and extinct species. However, these platforms are dependent on library construction and amplification steps that may result in sequences that do not reflect the original DNA template composition. This is particularly true for ancient DNA, where templates have undergone extensive damage post-mortem. Here, we report the results of the first "true single molecule sequencing" of ancient DNA. We generated 115.9 Mb and 76.9 Mb of DNA sequences from a permafrost-preserved Pleistocene horse bone using the Helicos HeliScope and Illumina GAIIx platforms, respectively. We find that the percentage of endogenous DNA sequences derived from the horse is higher among the Helicos data than Illumina data. This result indicates that the molecular biology tools used to generate sequencing libraries of ancient DNA molecules, as required for second-generation sequencing, introduce biases into the data that reduce the efficiency of the sequencing process and limit our ability to fully explore the molecular complexity of ancient DNA extracts. We demonstrate that simple modifications to the standard Helicos DNA template preparation protocol further increase the proportion of horse DNA for this sample by threefold. Comparison of Helicos-specific biases and sequence errors in modern DNA with those in ancient DNA also reveals extensive cytosine deamination damage at the 39 ends of ancient templates, indicating the presence of 39-sequence overhangs. Our results suggest that paleogenomes could be sequenced in an unprecedented manner by combining current second- and third-generation sequencing approaches. © 2011 by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.


Ginolhac A.,Copenhagen University | Vilstrup J.,Copenhagen University | Stenderup J.,Copenhagen University | Rasmussen M.,Copenhagen University | And 12 more authors.
BMC Genomics | Year: 2012

Background: Second-generation sequencing technologies have revolutionized our ability to recover genetic information from the past, allowing the characterization of the first complete genomes from past individuals and extinct species. Recently, third generation Helicos sequencing platforms, which perform true Single-Molecule DNA Sequencing (tSMS), have shown great potential for sequencing DNA molecules from Pleistocene fossils. Here, we aim at improving even further the performance of tSMS for ancient DNA by testing two novel tSMS template preparation methods for Pleistocene bone fossils, namely oligonucleotide spiking and treatment with DNA phosphatase.Results: We found that a significantly larger fraction of the horse genome could be covered following oligonucleotide spiking however not reproducibly and at the cost of extra post-sequencing filtering procedures and skewed %GC content. In contrast, we showed that treating ancient DNA extracts with DNA phosphatase improved the amount of endogenous sequence information recovered per sequencing channel by up to 3.3-fold, while still providing molecular signatures of endogenous ancient DNA damage, including cytosine deamination and fragmentation by depurination. Additionally, we confirmed the existence of molecular preservation niches in large bone crystals from which DNA could be preferentially extracted.Conclusions: We propose DNA phosphatase treatment as a mechanism to increase sequence coverage of ancient genomes when using Helicos tSMS as a sequencing platform. Together with mild denaturation temperatures that favor access to endogenous ancient templates over modern DNA contaminants, this simple preparation procedure can improve overall Helicos tSMS performance when damaged DNA templates are targeted. © 2012 Ginolhac et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Hare P.G.,Government of Yukon | Thomas C.D.,Government of Yukon | Topper T.N.,Yukon College | Gotthardt R.M.,Government of Yukon
Arctic | Year: 2012

Since 1997, more than 207 archaeological objects and 1700 faunal remains have been recovered from 43 melting ice patches in the southern Yukon. The artifacts range in age from a 9000-year-old (calendar) dart shaft to a 19th-century musket ball. This paper provides an update on Yukon ice patch research and summary data on select areas of research conducted since 2003. More than 200 radiocarbon dates have been run on ice patch archaeological and faunal materials, and these data allow us to observe and comment on apparent temporal trends. Analysis undertaken since 2003 has improved our understanding of the development and maintenance of hunting technologies, including dart shaft design, wood selection, and point styles. Of particular interest is the description of three different techniques for the construction of throwing darts and the observation of stability in the hunting technology employed in the study area over seven millennia. Radiocarbon chronologies indicate that this period of stability was followed by an abrupt technological replacement of the throwing dart by the bow and arrow after 1200 BP. © The Arctic Institute of North America.


Raghavan M.,Copenhagen University | Espregueira Themudo G.,University of Southern Denmark | Espregueira Themudo G.,CIIMAR – Interdisciplinary Center of Marine and Environmental | Smith C.I.,La Trobe University | And 3 more authors.
Quaternary Science Reviews | Year: 2014

Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios have been used as markers for palaeoclimatic and palaeoecological reconstructions across various geographical and temporal ranges. Such studies are essential for understanding how a particular species responded to changing environmental conditions in the past, especially changing vegetation, which might have even generated conditions stressful enough to threaten the very survival of the species. We present in this study a dataset of stable carbon and nitrogen isotope measurements (δ13C and δ15N) generated from 160 Pleistocene and Holocene musk ox (Ovibos moschatus) specimens. We used the dataset to evaluate the usefulness of these dietary indicators in tracing vegetation and climatic fluctuations in the holarctic region during the Pleistocene and Holocene. Our data show that musk ox stable isotopes largely followed changes in precipitation and that these variations were closely associated with events such as the cold and arid Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), Bølling-Allerød interstadial, Younger Dryas stadial and the warmer and humid Holocene. Regional differences in the isotopic composition of the musk ox populations are also noticeable, altogether providing insights into how an adaptable, generalist diet in the face of climate change might have helped this species survive the Holocene megafaunal extinctions. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

Loading Government of Yukon collaborators
Loading Government of Yukon collaborators