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Goshen, IN, United States

Goshen College is a private liberal arts college in Goshen, Indiana. The institution was founded in 1894 as the Elkhart Institute, and is affiliated with Mennonite Church USA. It has an enrollment of around 1,000 students. The college is accredited by North Central Association of Colleges and Schools and is a member of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities.Goshen College maintains a distinctive Christian Mennonite environment, but admits students of all religions. U.S. News and World Reports ranks Goshen as a third-tier liberal arts college.Goshen is known for its Study-Service Term , a program that takes students to another country for three months. Students' time on SST is split into two sections. For the first half of the semester students study the country's language, history and culture, usually in the capital. In the second half, students live with host families in smaller cities or rural areas where they do service work. Service placements range from teaching English to working on a farm, recording traditional natural remedies to playing with children at a childcare facility. The Study Service program was founded in 1968 before study-abroad programs became widespread. Current SST destination options are Peru, Senegal, Tanzania, China, and Cambodia. The college has also offered a domestic SST to immerse students in the Latino culture and community in northern Indiana.Goshen College is home to the Mennonite Quarterly Review and the Mennonite Historical Library, a 75,000 volume library compiling the most comprehensive collection of Anabaptist material in the United States.Goshen tends to maintain a fairly steady 55/45 ratio of women to men. Goshen's student percentage of Mennonite students to other affiliations is approximately 50/50. Wikipedia.


Sensenig R.L.,University of California at Davis | Sensenig R.L.,Mpala Research Center | Sensenig R.L.,Goshen College | Demment M.W.,University of California at Davis | Laca E.A.,University of California at Davis
Ecology | Year: 2010

The high herbivore diversity in savanna systems has been attributed to the inherent spatial and temporal heterogeneity related to the quantity and quality of food resources. Allometric scaling predicts that smaller-bodied grazers rely on higher quality forage than larger-bodied grazers. We replicated burns at varying scales in an East African savanna and measured visitation by an entire guild of larger grazers ranging in size from hare to elephant. We found a strong negative relationship between burn preference and body mass with foregut fermenters preferring burns to a greater degree than hindgut fermenters. Burns with higher quality forage were preferred more than burns with lower quality forage by small- bodied grazers, while the opposite was true for large-bodied grazers. Our results represent some of the first experimental evidence demonstrating the importance of body size in predicting how large herbivores respond to fire-induced changes in plant quality and quantity. © 2010 by the Ecological Society of America. Source


Margotta J.W.,University of Nevada, Las Vegas | Mancinelli G.E.,Central Michigan University | Benito A.A.,University of Nevada, Las Vegas | Ammons A.,Goshen College | And 2 more authors.
Insects | Year: 2013

Honey bees move through a series of in-hive tasks (e.g., "nursing") to outside tasks (e.g., "foraging") that are coincident with physiological changes and higher levels of metabolic activity. Social context can cause worker bees to speed up or slow down this process, and foragers may revert back to their earlier in-hive tasks accompanied by reversion to earlier physiological states. To investigate the effects of flight, behavioral state and age on gene expression, we used whole-genome microarrays and real-time PCR. Brain tissue and flight muscle exhibited different patterns of expression during behavioral transitions, with expression patterns in the brain reflecting both age and behavior, and expression patterns in flight muscle being primarily determined by age. Our data suggest that the transition from behaviors requiring little to no flight (nursing) to those requiring prolonged flight bouts (foraging), rather than the amount of previous flight per se, has a major effect on gene expression. Following behavioral reversion there was a partial reversion in gene expression but some aspects of forager expression patterns, such as those for genes involved in immune function, remained. Combined with our real-time PCR data, these data suggest an epigenetic control and energy balance role in honey bee functional senescence. © 2013 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Source


Trademark
Goshen College | Date: 2013-01-08

Metal key chains. Printed matter, namely, decals, notebooks, writing pads, stationery, folders, postcards, binders, bumper stickers, business cards, calendars, envelopes, letterhead paper, planning and appointment books, tablets of paper, writing pad holders, academic and entertainment publications, namely, event programs and brochures about student recruitment and student experience, fundraising, alumni, and church relations; printed university academic catalog; pamphlets in the field of traditional and adult student recruitment and student experience; school yearbooks; newspapers, books, brochures and pamphlets concerning university admissions, alumni activities and general university information; printed invitations; posters; pencils; pens. Clothing and accessories, namely, t-shirts, shirts, sweatshirts, sweatpants, pants, jackets, coats, shorts, ties, caps, hats, sock caps, visors, socks, sleepwear, footwear, belts, hooded sweatshirts, long sleeved T-shirts, tank tops, jerseys, collared shirts, sweaters, boxer shorts, scarves, mittens, infant shirts, infant bodysuits, childrens t-shirts, childrens sweatshirts. Educational services, namely, arranging and conducting, online and in person, instructional courses public lectures, workshops, seminars, conferences, and academic exhibitions at the college level, specifically at the undergraduate, graduate, and professional levels and distribution of printed and multi-media course materials in connection therewith; entertainment services, namely, conducting intramural and intercollegiate athletic competitions, intramural and intercollegiate athletic programs, live show performances and presentation of lectures in the fields of academics and performing arts; arranging, organizing, conducting and hosting social events in the nature of parties for undergraduates and alumni; educational research; providing facilities for recreational activities, namely, athletic training, baseball, basketball, bowling, cross country, football, golf, recreational sports, soccer, softball, strength and conditioning, swimming and diving, tennis, track and field, and volleyball; arranging and conducting artistic performances, concerts, and cultural events; providing online information concerning college admissions, alumni activities, and general college information; book and journal publishing.


Trademark
Goshen College | Date: 2012-04-20

Printed matter, namely, decals, notebooks, writing pads, stationery, folders, postcards, binders, bumper stickers, business cards, calendars, envelopes, letterhead paper, planning and appointment books, tablets of paper, writing pad holders, academic and entertainment publications, namely, event programs and brochures about student recruitment and student experience, fundraising, alumni, and church relations; printed university academic catalog; pamphlets in the field of traditional and adult student recruitment and student experience; school yearbooks; newspapers, books, brochures and pamphlets concerning university admissions, alumni activities and general university information; printed invitations; posters; pencils; pens. Clothing and accessories, namely, t-shirts, shirts, sweatshirts, sweatpants, pants, jackets, coats, shorts, ties, caps, hats, sock caps, visors, socks, sleepwear, footwear, belts, hooded sweatshirts, long sleeved T-shirts, tank tops, jerseys, collared shirts, sweaters, boxer shorts, scarves, mittens, infant shirts, infant bodysuits, childrens t-shirts, childrens sweatshirts. Christmas tree ornaments and decorations. Educational services, namely, arranging and conducting, online and in person, instructional courses public lectures, workshops, seminars, conferences, and academic exhibitions at the college level, specifically at the undergraduate, graduate, and professional levels and distribution of printed and multi-media course materials in connection therewith; entertainment services, namely, conducting intramural and intercollegiate athletic competitions, intramural and intercollegiate athletic programs, live show performances and presentation of lectures in the fields of academics and performing arts; arranging, organizing, conducting and hosting social events in the nature of parties for undergraduates and alumni; educational research; providing facilities for recreational activities, namely, athletic training, baseball, basketball, bowling, cross country, football, golf, recreational sports, soccer, softball, strength and conditioning, swimming and diving, tennis, track and field, and volleyball; arranging and conducting artistic performances, concerts, and cultural events; providing online information concerning college admissions, alumni activities, and general college information; book and journal publishing.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 598.00K | Year: 2013

This project provides scholarships to able and financially needy students majoring in the sciences and mathematics. The project is open to all students who meet academic and financial eligibility requirements and emphasizes supporting students, especially first-generation college students and members of groups underrepresented in the sciences.

Intellectual Merit: The academic programs into which the students go are strong, and there are academic support activities. Students are being attracted to the scholarships through family-based recruitment practices, collaboration with local high schools, and partnerships with local nonprofit agencies. Retention and graduation rates are being increased by a summer bridge program, an orientation program, supplemental instruction in key STEM courses, intensive academic advising, and summer research and internship opportunities. Professional success is encouraged through regular group meetings, individualized portfolios, and career services.

Broader Impact: The project is increasing the number and diversity of students who complete a STEM major and go on to work in the field or to further education. Results of this program are being disseminated through professional conferences and higher education publications and shared with partner high schools. Successful support structures built for these students are being incorporated into the colleges programs.

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