Mountain View, CA, United States
Mountain View, CA, United States

Google is a United States-headquartered, multinational corporation specializing in Internet-related services and products. These include online advertising technologies, search, cloud computing, and software. Most of its profits are derived from AdWords, an online advertising service that places advertising near the list of search results.Google was founded by Larry Page and Sergey Brin while they were Ph.D. students at Stanford University. Together they own about 14 percent of its shares but control 56 of the stockholder voting power through supervoting stock. They incorporated Google as a privately held company on September 4, 1998. An initial public offering followed on August 19, 2004. Its mission statement from the outset was "to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful," and its unofficial slogan was "Don't be evil." In 2004, Google moved to its new headquarters in Mountain View, California, nicknamed the Googleplex.Rapid growth since incorporation has triggered a chain of products, acquisitions and partnerships beyond Google's core search engine. It offers online productivity software including email , a cloud storage service , an office suite and a social networking service . Desktop products include applications for web browsing, organizing and editing photos, and instant messaging. The company leads the development of the Android mobile operating system and the browser-only Chrome OS for a netbook known as a Chromebook. Google has moved increasingly into communications hardware: it partners with major electronics manufacturers in the production of its "high-quality low-cost" Nexus devices and acquired Motorola Mobility in May 2012. In 2012, a fiber-optic infrastructure was installed in Kansas City to facilitate a Google Fiber broadband service.The corporation has been estimated to run more than one million servers in data centers around the world ; and to process over one billion search requests, and about 24 petabytes of user-generated data, each day .In December 2013 Alexa listed google.com as the most visited website in the world. Numerous Google sites in other languages figure in the top one hundred, as do several other Google-owned sites such as YouTube and Blogger. Its market dominance has led to prominent media coverage, including criticism of the company over issues such as search neutrality, copyright, censorship, and privacy. Wikipedia.

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Maker Faire Bay Area 2017: San Mateo, CA, May 19, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Arduino and myDevices joined forces to host a global contest in search for an Internet of Things (IoT) inspired home automation project. Arduino is a world-leading, user-friendly platform for open hardware, and myDevices’ Cayenne is the world’s first drag-and-drop IoT project builder. In thirty days, thirty projects were submitted in the areas of smart home, security, agriculture, lighting, food preparation, and more. Thirty-four Arduino boards were used, ranging from the Uno to the Mega. More than 130 sensors were deployed, with 87 triggers (alerts), 39 schedules, and 103 actuators. The four judges: Andrew Miller, Makerspaces.com CEO & founder; Chris Aviles, edtech speaker and Google Innovator; Ken Burns, TinyCircuits.com president & founder; and Giovanni Gentile, IoT maker expert & 0lab founder; were impressed with the projects, and ultimately chose Mitch Kempfort, grand prize-winner, for his automated smart aquarium. Kempfort, awarded an all-expenses-paid trip to Maker Faire Bay Area to exhibit in Cayenne’s booth, along with branded tchotchkes from each company, commented, “As I set out to build the smart aquarium, there were so many components independent of each other, and I wanted a more streamlined, sophisticated way to monitor the entire aquarium. I thought it would be better if they were all connected with a system that would manage and communicate all of it from one place -- the pumps, heater, lights, and feeding, all in one. So, using Arduino, I decided to build a system thatwould handle it all, with myDevices’ Cayenne as the command center.” “This contest searching for the most creative home automation project using an Arduino and Cayenne yielded an impressive array of innovation from across the globe,” said Benny Estes, myDevices Product Manager and Head of the Cayenne Community. “The submissions underscore the ease in which users can now move from ideation to finished projects with user-friendly tools dedicated to makers.” The winning aquarium was self-regulating, featuring temperature, water flow, and energy consumption monitoring, as well as automated lighting and feeding. An OLED screen displayed from 3D printed housing showed status information through the Cayenne dashboard and mobile app, which also enabled detailed data visualization and remote control. Considering the amount of coding that would have been required to manage such an assortment of sensors, Cayenne allowed Kempfort to ‘put a face’ on the data and made it easy to manage. The project was built using an Arduino Mega, an ESP8266-01S, and a Mega Protoboard. “It has been impressive to see these innovative projects come in - the passion for IoT in the Arduino community is producing amazing results,” said Federico Musto, Arduino CEO. “As the IoT continues to crystallize in various vertical markets, the flexibility behind Arduino's open technology allows developers to create highly-targeted, more effective applications. This contest has been a fun way to reward these Makers for their creative work.” The first runner up built an automated home vegetable garden, and the second runner up built a living room control system. For more on the projects, visit myDevices website. About myDevices myDevices, an IoT solutions company, is the creator of Cayenne, the world’s first drag-and-drop IoT Project Builder, which enables customers to bring their IoT projects from prototype to mass production. The company also hosts a vibrant online community of IoT developers where users collaborate and share information. myDevices’ connectivity and device-agnostic technology empowers engineers and enterprise partners to easily develop and deploy IoT solutions into their existing infrastructure and business. myDevices is headquartered in Los Angeles, CA. For more information and to download Cayenne, please visit www.myDevices.com About Arduino Arduino is the world’s leading open-source software and hardware ecosystem. The Company offers IoT developers and Makers of all ages the ability to build smart, connected and interactive devices using affordable technologies. Check us out at www.arduino.org and www.arduino.cc.


Maker Faire Bay Area 2017: San Mateo, CA, May 19, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Arduino and myDevices joined forces to host a global contest in search for an Internet of Things (IoT) inspired home automation project. Arduino is a world-leading, user-friendly platform for open hardware, and myDevices’ Cayenne is the world’s first drag-and-drop IoT project builder. In thirty days, thirty projects were submitted in the areas of smart home, security, agriculture, lighting, food preparation, and more. Thirty-four Arduino boards were used, ranging from the Uno to the Mega. More than 130 sensors were deployed, with 87 triggers (alerts), 39 schedules, and 103 actuators. The four judges: Andrew Miller, Makerspaces.com CEO & founder; Chris Aviles, edtech speaker and Google Innovator; Ken Burns, TinyCircuits.com president & founder; and Giovanni Gentile, IoT maker expert & 0lab founder; were impressed with the projects, and ultimately chose Mitch Kempfort, grand prize-winner, for his automated smart aquarium. Kempfort, awarded an all-expenses-paid trip to Maker Faire Bay Area to exhibit in Cayenne’s booth, along with branded tchotchkes from each company, commented, “As I set out to build the smart aquarium, there were so many components independent of each other, and I wanted a more streamlined, sophisticated way to monitor the entire aquarium. I thought it would be better if they were all connected with a system that would manage and communicate all of it from one place -- the pumps, heater, lights, and feeding, all in one. So, using Arduino, I decided to build a system thatwould handle it all, with myDevices’ Cayenne as the command center.” “This contest searching for the most creative home automation project using an Arduino and Cayenne yielded an impressive array of innovation from across the globe,” said Benny Estes, myDevices Product Manager and Head of the Cayenne Community. “The submissions underscore the ease in which users can now move from ideation to finished projects with user-friendly tools dedicated to makers.” The winning aquarium was self-regulating, featuring temperature, water flow, and energy consumption monitoring, as well as automated lighting and feeding. An OLED screen displayed from 3D printed housing showed status information through the Cayenne dashboard and mobile app, which also enabled detailed data visualization and remote control. Considering the amount of coding that would have been required to manage such an assortment of sensors, Cayenne allowed Kempfort to ‘put a face’ on the data and made it easy to manage. The project was built using an Arduino Mega, an ESP8266-01S, and a Mega Protoboard. “It has been impressive to see these innovative projects come in - the passion for IoT in the Arduino community is producing amazing results,” said Federico Musto, Arduino CEO. “As the IoT continues to crystallize in various vertical markets, the flexibility behind Arduino's open technology allows developers to create highly-targeted, more effective applications. This contest has been a fun way to reward these Makers for their creative work.” The first runner up built an automated home vegetable garden, and the second runner up built a living room control system. For more on the projects, visit myDevices website. About myDevices myDevices, an IoT solutions company, is the creator of Cayenne, the world’s first drag-and-drop IoT Project Builder, which enables customers to bring their IoT projects from prototype to mass production. The company also hosts a vibrant online community of IoT developers where users collaborate and share information. myDevices’ connectivity and device-agnostic technology empowers engineers and enterprise partners to easily develop and deploy IoT solutions into their existing infrastructure and business. myDevices is headquartered in Los Angeles, CA. For more information and to download Cayenne, please visit www.myDevices.com About Arduino Arduino is the world’s leading open-source software and hardware ecosystem. The Company offers IoT developers and Makers of all ages the ability to build smart, connected and interactive devices using affordable technologies. Check us out at www.arduino.org and www.arduino.cc.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.techrepublic.com

A new service from Google Cloud Platform (GCP) could help businesses securely connect and manage their Internet of Things (IoT) devices at scale. The Google Cloud IoT Core, announced via press release on Tuesday, offers a central point of management for IoT devices and integrations with other Google analytics services. The service will manage aspects of an organization's IoT deployment such as data ingestion, scalability, availability, and performance, the release said. Additionally, users will be able to build IoT applications that utilize the additional analytics tools. SEE: How to become an IoT developer: 6 tips With Cloud IoT Core, an organization can connect millions of IoT devices from around the world to one system. The devices would be registered through the MQTT protocol, the release noted, and devices built on the Android Things platform have the option of receiving automatic firmware updates as well. The service also utilizes standard security protocols, the release said, and Google Cloud IAM roles can be used with IoT devices to provide even tighter access control. For analytics, users can push their IoT data to Google services such as Cloud Dataflow, BigQuery, and Google Cloud Machine Learning Engine. However, there are also integrations available with partner products from Looker, Qlik, Tableau, and Zoomdata. Some examples of analytics insights from IoT data could be monitoring energy use and scheduled equipment maintenance, the release said. In the press release, Google said it believes that it is the right time to offer such a service, because many major companies are struggling to manage the cost, complexity, security issues, and data fragmentation associated with IoT deployments. The goal of Cloud IoT Core is to limit the risk and complexity that can come with such a project, and break down the data silos as well, the release said. Like many other GCP products, the Cloud IoT Core will be offered in a pay-as-you-go revenue model, the release noted. Customers will not be expected to provide any additional infrastructure for the deployment. Google Cloud IoT Core is available now in private beta.


Maker Faire Bay Area 2017: San Mateo, CA, May 19, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Arduino and myDevices joined forces to host a global contest in search for an Internet of Things (IoT) inspired home automation project. Arduino is a world-leading, user-friendly platform for open hardware, and myDevices’ Cayenne is the world’s first drag-and-drop IoT project builder. In thirty days, thirty projects were submitted in the areas of smart home, security, agriculture, lighting, food preparation, and more. Thirty-four Arduino boards were used, ranging from the Uno to the Mega. More than 130 sensors were deployed, with 87 triggers (alerts), 39 schedules, and 103 actuators. The four judges: Andrew Miller, Makerspaces.com CEO & founder; Chris Aviles, edtech speaker and Google Innovator; Ken Burns, TinyCircuits.com president & founder; and Giovanni Gentile, IoT maker expert & 0lab founder; were impressed with the projects, and ultimately chose Mitch Kempfort, grand prize-winner, for his automated smart aquarium. Kempfort, awarded an all-expenses-paid trip to Maker Faire Bay Area to exhibit in Cayenne’s booth, along with branded tchotchkes from each company, commented, “As I set out to build the smart aquarium, there were so many components independent of each other, and I wanted a more streamlined, sophisticated way to monitor the entire aquarium. I thought it would be better if they were all connected with a system that would manage and communicate all of it from one place -- the pumps, heater, lights, and feeding, all in one. So, using Arduino, I decided to build a system thatwould handle it all, with myDevices’ Cayenne as the command center.” “This contest searching for the most creative home automation project using an Arduino and Cayenne yielded an impressive array of innovation from across the globe,” said Benny Estes, myDevices Product Manager and Head of the Cayenne Community. “The submissions underscore the ease in which users can now move from ideation to finished projects with user-friendly tools dedicated to makers.” The winning aquarium was self-regulating, featuring temperature, water flow, and energy consumption monitoring, as well as automated lighting and feeding. An OLED screen displayed from 3D printed housing showed status information through the Cayenne dashboard and mobile app, which also enabled detailed data visualization and remote control. Considering the amount of coding that would have been required to manage such an assortment of sensors, Cayenne allowed Kempfort to ‘put a face’ on the data and made it easy to manage. The project was built using an Arduino Mega, an ESP8266-01S, and a Mega Protoboard. “It has been impressive to see these innovative projects come in - the passion for IoT in the Arduino community is producing amazing results,” said Federico Musto, Arduino CEO. “As the IoT continues to crystallize in various vertical markets, the flexibility behind Arduino's open technology allows developers to create highly-targeted, more effective applications. This contest has been a fun way to reward these Makers for their creative work.” The first runner up built an automated home vegetable garden, and the second runner up built a living room control system. For more on the projects, visit myDevices website. About myDevices myDevices, an IoT solutions company, is the creator of Cayenne, the world’s first drag-and-drop IoT Project Builder, which enables customers to bring their IoT projects from prototype to mass production. The company also hosts a vibrant online community of IoT developers where users collaborate and share information. myDevices’ connectivity and device-agnostic technology empowers engineers and enterprise partners to easily develop and deploy IoT solutions into their existing infrastructure and business. myDevices is headquartered in Los Angeles, CA. For more information and to download Cayenne, please visit www.myDevices.com About Arduino Arduino is the world’s leading open-source software and hardware ecosystem. The Company offers IoT developers and Makers of all ages the ability to build smart, connected and interactive devices using affordable technologies. Check us out at www.arduino.org and www.arduino.cc.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

SANTA CLARA, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Today, Lunera named Ajay Malik, chief technology officer (CTO) to deliver Smart Building Services that are a generation ahead of other “Industrial IoT” solutions. Ajay’s track record of success at revered technology companies, coupled with his proven ability to create lasting impact on foundational industries will drive Lunera to be first-to-market with transformational Smart Building Services. “Similar to the way the smart phone transformed from a device that could only make or take calls, to a handheld computing device which changed the social fabric, Ajay has the vision and technical aptitude to unlock one of a building’s most underutilized resource, an LED lamp,” said John Bruggeman, CEO of Lunera. “Intelligence embedded into LED lamps will create the backbone from which new application and services are only hindered by one’s imagination.” “In the space of three weeks, Lunera has added two super stars to an already deep bench giving it the best management team in Industrial IoT,” said Gary Dillabough, chairman of the board, Lunera. “It will be exciting to watch this team fulfill the promise of Industrial IoT through Smart Building Services.” Ajay joins Lunera from Google, where he was head of architecture and engineering for worldwide corporate networking. Prior to Google, Ajay was senior vice president of engineering and products at Meru Networks where he led the transformation of the company’s technology which resulted in its acquisition by Fortinet. Ajay has also held executive leadership positions at Hewlett-Packard, Cisco, and Motorola. Ajay brings over 25 years of executive engineering leadership and entrepreneurial experience in delivering award-winning innovative products in Software, Software-as-a-Service (SaaS), Wi-Fi, Real-Time Location (RTLS), Internet of Things (IoT), and Software-defined Networking (SDN) industries and holds over 80 patents issued/pending, and is the author of “RTLS for Dummies” and “Augmented Reality for Dummies.” Ajay holds Bachelors of Engineering in Computer Science and Technology from IIT Roorkee, India. Lunera is a Smart Building Services company that uses innovative Industrial Internet of Things (IoT) technology to optimize energy, property and resource management for the commercial and industrial buildings market. Lunera’s unique invention embeds IoT-edge technology, sensors, controls, modems and microprocessors, into an LED lamp. Lunera LED Sensor lamps allow customers to reduce overall energy spend, HVAC, plus lighting, plus plug-load, by up to 50 percent. Lunera has deployed millions of plug-and-play LED lamps across multiple market segments including retail, hospitality, commercial office, healthcare, education, and municipal. Lunera also provides customers a convenient pay-for-use software-as-a-service model. For additional information, visit www.lunera.com or connect with us on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook.


For the last 15 years, the Cleantech Forum has been organized by the Cleantech Group. Most recently it took place in San Francisco on January 25-27, 2016. Energy storage, China and the Internet of Things (IoT) were key topics at the forum, with investors and entrepreneurs confident on their respective futures. Energy storage, in particular, was keenly discussed, with Vic Shao, CEO at Green Charge Networks, predicting “2016 will be the year of deployment for storage.” Anticipation around storage deployment has been gathering for a few years now. In 2014, Navigant Research predicted that worldwide revenue from energy storage would increase from $675 million in 2014 to $15.6 billion in 2024. Last year, Deutsche Bank reported that technological advancement could make energy storage a solution that could be deployed on a large scale within the next five years. Andrew Beebe, Managing Director at Obvious Ventures, sees similarities between energy storage today and solar energy a decade ago. “ Energy storage is just like solar panels were 10 years ago. We are at an early stage of that process, but what we are about to see in storage is what solar did a few years ago,” says Beebe. While Silicon Valley has been the driving force behind major breakthroughs in storage technology, the development of energy storage has also been moving forward north of the border. For the past few years, Canada’s largest province (similar to a state), Ontario, has been building up its energy storage system. Strong interest from Ontario’s utility sector and a supportive ecosystem for cleantech, developed by both the national and provincial governments, have enabled Ontario to establish a lead in energy storage. Tom Rand, Managing Partner at ArcTern Ventures, agreed that while energy storage technology is developing well, more work still remains in understanding the characteristics of this new asset. “We’ve established a lead in technology, and are now working to develop operational capacity and awareness in our utility sector,” says Rand. Toronto-based NRStor, an energy storage project developer, and Hydrostor are two examples of energy storage development in Ontario. Last year, NRStor partnered with Tesla to bring the Powerwall Home Battery to Canada. Likewise, Hydrostor, one of the beneficiaries of the privately backed ArcTern’s investment, is partnering with Toronto Hydro, a municipal electricity distribution company, to develop underwater batteries. Lately, China has witnessed major policy developments related to climate change and clean energy. The U.S.-China Climate Agreement, Chinese President Xi Jinping’s announcement of a cap-and-trade system and a leaner and greener five-year plan have created a new model of economic development, which could not only curb energy usage, but also provide opportunities for cleantech entrepreneurs. Alex Shoer, CEO at Seeder, is one such entrepreneur who is looking to address energy efficiency in buildings. His company provides a marketplace that connects commercial building managers with green technologies for retrofits, as well as the capital to pay for it. “There’s a huge amount of development, but while there are mandates in terms of efficiency targets and sustainability in buildings, there’s a knowledge and access gap between available solutions, qualified providers and financing options,” says Shoer. But while Shoer has successfully started operating in China, he points out that entrepreneurs looking to enter the Chinese market need to pay special consideration to building partnerships and relationships. “In China and in many other developing countries, trust is the most important thing. It takes time and persistence to develop these ‘trust’ relationships, but one way to speed up the process is to work with, or work through, an existing trusted party or marketplace already on the ground,” he says. Leo Zhang, Senior Analyst at Cleantech Group, echoes Shoer’s sentiment. He emphasizes that finding the right partner also can help entrepreneurs navigate and enter the market, especially when companies have no presence in China. “China is heavily relationship-driven, so having local partners will open lots of doors, rather than going into it blindly by yourself. A partner can provide their infrastructure to scale-up the technology, or can be the pilot program to test your product,” says Zhang. The unique nature of doing business in China requires a collective approach to building relationships and trust. Albin Jourda, founder of French Cleantech, says that French companies are working together to establish these partnerships in China. “Building partnerships is one of the main challenges French companies may face in China. For this reason, the UMO (Union de Maîtrise d’œuvre), which is a group of six French companies, worked together and signed agreements for a period of 5 years with the city of Chengdu,” says Jourda The potential for IoT solutions to be deployed in the energy landscape has created opportunities to drive efficiencies, increase productivity and promote economic growth. Joe Costello, CEO at Enlighted, whose company was named in the 2015 Global Cleantech 100 and also won the North American Company of the Year award, believes that IoT is not only good for the environment and reducing costs, but also for creating new innovative tools for doing business. “Our clients who use the sensor technology save 50 to 75% of their energy costs,” says Costello, who was named the top American CEO in 1997 by Chief Executive Magazine. Enlighted’s client list includes Google, LinkedIn and HP. Costello, does, however, point out that the capital-intensive aspect of implementing sensor technology has hindered growth. To accommodate this, Enlighted created an innovative financing model for its customers. “This type of technology does require a large amount of capital. Small companies would require around $10 million, and large companies $100 million to implement our system. This was our biggest constraint to growth; so we put all the money down for our customers, and they pay us back from the energy savings that the system provides,” he explains. Through their innovative financing model, called GEO, Enlighted customers receive full energy benefits and have a sensor network that enables them to optimize commercial space with zero upfront cost. Even for large companies, IoT is gaining importance and being incorporated into their daily business activities. IBM, a company well-known to reshape itself, has made IoT “a major priority” for its business as the company continues to focus on its key growth initiatives. “IoT is a major priority for IBM, and is one of the new businesses that we have created as the company continues to innovate. IoT holds out the promise of more granular monitoring and optimization of process performance in just about any context — therefore, it will become integral to resource efficiency as one aspect of performance,” says Peter Williams, Chief Technology Officer, Big Green Innovations, at IBM. Aside from IBM’s business activities, the company is utilizing the benefits of IoT to improve daily operations within its buildings, manufacturing and, in particular, its data centers. “IBM is a heavy user of IoT in our buildings, manufacturing and in particular in our data centers, to optimize HVAC loads and building performance,” Williams adds. The benefits of IoT also stretch beyond advanced economies and, perhaps, create a greater impact. In Africa, the IoT is enabling customers to leapfrog over the conventional electricity grid and go straight to “mobile power” — in a similar way that they have already leapfrogged over conventional telecommunications grids to mobile communications. At the forefront, Jesse Moore, CEO at M-KOPA Solar, is using IoT for solar system metering and performance management, and his company has connected solar power to more than 300,000 homes in East Africa. “What’s exciting and perhaps unexpected is the fact that IoT is enabling low-income, off-grid customers to leapfrog straight to solar power,” says Moore. Moore continues to highlight how the multidimensional nature of IoT is also providing ways to improve customer service. “Data coming back from our solar systems tells us when a customer’s rooftop panel is in the shade, so we can advise them to move it to a better location. To be able to remotely support customers in remote and rural parts of East Africa is a magical thing!” he says, regarding the additional benefits of IoT.


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

NEWARK, N.J., Nov. 02, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Arkados Group, Inc. (OTCQB:AKDS), a global provider of scalable and interoperable Internet of Things (IoT) solutions focused on industrial automation and energy management, today announced and commented on the Company’s consolidated financial and operational results for the fiscal first quarter 2017 ending on August 31, 2016. Financial and Operational Highlights for the Three Months Ended August 31, 2016: “We are very pleased with our first quarter results. Our financial performance continues to improve with extraordinary year-over-year revenue growth and an expansion of our services, products and customer base.  In Fiscal Year 2017 we expect to continue to expand our services business with additional, value-add offerings, and introduce new, cutting-edge technology products, both with the goal of reducing cost and improving productivity for our commercial and industrial customers. The forthcoming products will run on our recently released Arktic software platform and leverage the unique scalability and interoperability that commercial applications demand. We look forward to a very successful year and to further establishing Arkados as a leading provider of Industrial Internet of Things solutions for smart building, smart city and smart machine applications.” The Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended August 31, 2016 is on file with Securities and Exchange Commission. To access the report visit http://ir.arkadosgroup.com/. The Industrial Internet of Things is an explosive opportunity according to research firm Markets and Markets, which projects the IIoT market size to reach $151 billion by 2020 and just the smart building segment to reach $24 billion. In a November 2015 press release, Gartner estimates that the Internet of Things will support total professional services (defined as external providers that design, install and operate IoT systems for businesses under contract) spending of $235 billion in 2016, up 22% from 2015, and that connectivity services (through communications service providers) and consumer services will grow at an even faster pace. Another more recent Gartner report estimates IoT deployment in commercial buildings is on track to reach just over 1 billion in 2018. Verizon’s The Internet of Things 2015 report revealed that among organizations having integrated IoT into their operations, 82% reported increased efficiency; 49% saw enhancements in product quality; and 45% claimed IoT technology has increased customer satisfaction. Arkados Group, Inc. through its subsidiaries is a global provider of scalable and interoperable Internet of Things  (IoT) solutions focused on industrial automation and energy management. The Company’s solutions are uniquely designed to drive a wide variety of wireless and powerline communication (PLC)-based products, such as sensors, gateways, video cameras, appliances and other devices. By utilizing the Company’s solutions, Arkados’ customers can bring numerous sophisticated, full-featured products to market faster at a lower overall development cost.  Arkados® is a registered trademark of Arkados Group, Inc. For more information about Arkados, please visit us at http://www.arkadosgroup.com, and follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Google+. This news release contains forward-looking statements as defined by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements include statements concerning plans, objectives, goals, strategies, future events or performance, and underlying assumptions and other statements that are other than statements of historical facts.  These statements are subject to uncertainties and risks including, but not limited to, insufficient working capital, product and service demand and acceptance, changes in technology, economic conditions, the impact of competition and pricing, government regulations, and other risks contained in reports filed by the company with the Securities and Exchange Commission. All such forward-looking statements, whether written or oral, and whether made by or on behalf of the company, are expressly qualified by this cautionary statement and any other cautionary statements which may accompany the forward-looking statements. In addition, the company disclaims any obligation to update any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof.


Forty-nine percent of U.S. broadband households want ability to monitor and adjust their home thermostat remotely DALLAS, TX--(Marketwired - Feb 14, 2017) -  Parks Associates announced new smart energy research today showing that 49% of U.S. broadband households want the ability to monitor and adjust their thermostat remotely. 360 View: Energy Management, Smart Home, & Utility Programs notes 33% of U.S. broadband households find this feature very appealing. Parks Associates and industry experts, including Carrier, Constellation, Google, ipCapital Group, People Power, Sigma Designs/Z-Wave, and Vivint Smart Home, will address how companies can leverage voice control and artificial intelligence (AI) to broaden the consumer appeal and adoption of energy management solutions and whole-home systems at the eighth-annual Smart Energy Summit: Engaging the Consumer, February 20-22 at the Four Seasons Hotel in Austin, Texas. "Voice control has proven to be a very popular user interface among consumers, and it is transforming the smart home user experience," said Patrice Samuels, Senior Analyst, Parks Associates. "Integrating consumer-focused voice control solutions, such as the Amazon Echo, can create new value propositions for smart lighting, thermostats, and appliances, and by integrating voice control into energy applications, companies can expand consumer engagement with their services and solutions." Parks Associates notes that 2-4% of U.S. broadband households purchased an Echo in the past six months. The international firm notes that Amazon's Alexa technology, as well as Google Home, have the ability to drive adoption of multiple smart home and energy management products. The Smart Energy Summit session "Leveraging Voice Control and AI in Energy Management" on Wednesday, February 22, at 3 p.m., examines how voice control and artificial intelligence are transforming the smart home and its potential to drive energy management. Speakers for the session, which will be moderated by Patrice Samuels, include: "Voice control and artificial intelligence have just begun to touch home automation and energy management," said Nancy Cronin, Managing Partner, ipCapital Group, Inc. "ipCapital Group analyzed the patent activity in this space and finds abundant opportunity for future innovation, which will bring high value to both the customer and the companies serving the energy sector." "Smart Home Systems: Opportunities for Whole Home Management," Wednesday, February 22, at 4 p.m., moderated by Tom Kerber, Director of IoT Strategy, Parks Associates, examines the current and future roles of smart home service providers in the energy space and strategies to create value for consumers. The following speakers will discuss the competition to provide energy services as part of comprehensive, whole-home solutions: "The smart home is dumb compared to what it needs to be -- a conscious home -- and it must be significantly smarter and more secure in order to achieve full market potential. We must fix that. And, today, we can," said Gene Wang, CEO and Co-founder, People Power. "The next milestone in better serving the connected home comes from micro-services that constantly listen to and understand real-time data streams from a user's life to learn patterns and produce more intelligent outcomes. This happens through bot-enabled AI for IoT deployments, which allows businesses to integrate differentiating new services into legacy or in-market products and benefit from recurring subscription service fees. Then, increased whole home management adoption is eminent because everyone wins." Smart Energy Summit will host more than 300 executives in an intimate networking environment, with a focus on the convergence of smart energy and IoT with the smart home. Parks Associates will host the research workshop "Utilities and Consumer Engagement Strategies" on Monday, February 20, prior to Smart Energy Summit. Parks Associates is accepting press pass requests for Smart Energy Summit: Engaging the Consumer at http://www.parksassociates.com/ses-presspass. More information about the Smart Energy Summit is available at www.SES2017.com. To speak with an analyst or request specific research data, contact Holly Sprague at hsprague@gmail.com or 720-987-6614. About Smart Energy Summit Smart Energy Summit: Engaging the Consumer examines new cross-industry opportunities in the expanding market for energy solutions, including connected devices, energy management, utility services, and home control platforms and services, as they evolve within the smart home and consumer-based Internet of Things. Smart Energy Summit focuses particularly on the challenge of engaging consumers with energy-related solutions. Research analysts, thought leaders, and industry executives present and discuss business strategies, case studies, partnership opportunities, and consumer research that utilities, service providers, retailers, and manufacturers can use to expand and monetize their energy offerings. The eighth-annual Smart Energy Summit will take place February 20-22, 2017, at the Four Seasons Hotel in Austin, Texas. The summit agenda features leaders from utilities, state and national regulators, telecom and security companies, retailers, and OEMs. Follow the event on Twitter at @Smart Energy Smt and #Smart Energy 17 and on the Smart Energy Insights Blog. For information on speaking, sponsoring, or attending Smart Energy Summit, visit www.ses2017.com.


News Article | December 11, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

The internet of things (IoT) – that ever-expanding ecosystem of digital sensors, home appliances and wearable smart devices – attracts its fair share of attention. Speculation is rife on how the 23bn-odd (and counting) “things” will improve quality of life, streamline business operations and ultimately fuel economic benefits to the tune of up to $11tn per year by 2025. Less often considered is the cost to the environment of such a vast network of devices. With the full extent of the IoT far from being realised, even experts are divided on whether it will spell doom or salvation for the environment. One thing that experts can agree on is that we shouldn’t wait around to find out. “The internet of things will be the biggest, most sophisticated piece of equipment that we’ve deployed across the planet – ever,” says telecommunications expert Kerry Hinton, former director of the Centre for Energy Efficient Telecommunications at the University of Melbourne. “That means that we’ve got to think about the potential limitations on it due to power consumption, the use of rare earth elements – all of that – from day one.” According to Hinton, how energy hungry the IoT will be largely depends on the types of devices deployed and what they will be doing. At one end of the spectrum, low-power, low-data transmitting devices – such as sensors that monitor when vending machines need a refill – are unlikely to send energy bills through the roof. Indeed, many of these simple devices won’t tap into a building’s mains power at all. Long-lasting batteries will do most of the work and devices that can power themselves, by tapping into sunlight, vibrations or heat, are also in development. However, Hinton and others foresee an ecosystem of increasingly complex and energy-hungry devices emerging. Devices using video surveillance are a good example. Not only will these devices require mains power to function, they will also contribute significantly to the growth in data coursing through the internet’s veins. According to Cisco’s visual networking index, an ongoing survey of data-consumption trends, internet video surveillance traffic almost doubled between 2014 and 2015, and is set to increase tenfold by 2020. The problem of energy consumption will be a pernicious one, says Hinton. “These technologies on a device-by-device basis, or even a house-by-house basis, are not a significant additional contribution to overall power consumption,” he says. Multiply that across Australia though and “that’s going to boil down to another power station or another two power stations”. Far from being energy gluttons though, IoT devices could contribute to substantial energy and water savings, according to Bettina Tratz-Ryan, green IT specialist and research vice-president at Gartner. “Concepts like energy harvesting are a huge component of innovation that the IoT, specifically, can drive,” she says. In addition, sensors will allow smart buildings to ramp up temperature controls when needed, dim lights when nobody’s around and alert maintenance crews to water leaks as soon as they happen. This is exactly the kind of application fledgling IoT company SkyGrid is developing. “There’s a lot of gimmicky stuff out there but we’re interested in something that changes and improves the world,” says the company’s chief executive, Rory Gleeson. SkyGrid, which is based in Melbourne and Sydney, is developing a smart hot-water system in partnership with hot-water company Quantum Energy . The aim is to intelligently control when a building’s hot-water systems are switched on, so that energy isn’t wasted heating water when no one is around to use it – something that currently wastes as much as 50% of a system’s power. Of course the “things” are only one component of the IoT. The sheer volume of data being transmitted and stored is also set to explode. Data storage has become more energy efficient over recent years. Instead of being relegated to servers held in energy-inefficient company backrooms, data is increasingly stored and processed in the cloud. That’s to say, in large server farms operated by tech giants who have an interest in keeping energy consumption (and costs) to a minimum. Tech giants are turning to renewable energy to lessen their carbon footprint, according to Greenpeace’s 2015 Clicking Clean report. Apple’s data centres, for instance, boast 100% renewable energy, with Yahoo (73% renewables), Facebook (49%) and Google (46%) also improving their green credentials with renewables. (By contrast, Australia-based data centres for HP, IBM and Microsoft get 74% of their energy from coal-fired power). Companies are also strategically locating their data centres for improved energy inefficiency. In 2013, for example, Facebook opened a data centre in northern Sweden that is cooled with outside air and runs off local hydroelectric power. Because of these efficiencies, the deluge of data from the IoT, if stored in the cloud, won’t have a huge impact on energy consumption. But much of the IoT won’t be run off the cloud, says Hinton. Applications that require rapid data access and response times – such as health monitors and autonomous vehicles – will need data to be stored locally and efficiency gains from offshoring of data storage could diminish. Keeping data local isn’t all bad, according to Tratz-Ryan. “Devices are talking to each other without the data being pushed back into the network, which uses energy, which produces carbon,” she says. The Melbourne-based IoT company Freestyle takes advantage of this decentralisation of data to make more responsive energy grids. “It’s taking the intelligence away from centralised control and letting the devices make decisions on near-real-time events,” says its business development general manager, Brad Affleck. Freestyle has partnered with engineering firm PowerTec, South Australian utilities provider SA Power Networks and the University of Adelaide on an intelligent energy grid for Kangaroo Island in South Australia. Sensors and controllers in the grid intelligently manage energy sources to sway energy consumption towards renewables without sacrificing the reliability of the supply. With so many factors on either side of the environment ledger, crunching the numbers to determine whether our connected lives are good or bad for the environment is no mean feat. But the Global e-Sustainability Initiative (GeSI), an international consortium of tech companies and telcos, has attempted just that. In 2015, GeSI released its #SMARTer2030 report, which suggests that information and communications technologies, including the IoT, will be able to save almost 10 times the carbon dioxide emissions that it generates by 2030 through reduced travel, smart buildings and greater efficiencies in manufacturing and agriculture. While Tratz-Ryan is optimistic that this vision of the future is achievable, Hinton isn’t convinced. “The tricky bit,” he says, “is you’ve got to get people to do it” – a “non-trivial exercise” that will require significant public policy intervention. For Tratz-Ryan, policy is only one piece of the puzzle. More important will be peer pressure that encourages organisations and individuals to behave in a socially responsible way. “Policies are not enough to drive energy efficiency and climate change initiatives,” she says. “It has to come from the user community and it has to come from industry.”


— This report studies Industrial Internet-of-Things in Global market, especially in North America, Europe, China, Japan, Southeast Asia and India, with production, revenue, consumption, import and export in these regions, from 2011 to 2015, and forecast to 2021. This report focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering By types, the market can be split into Type I Type II Type III By Application, the market can be split into Aerospace & Defense Healthcare Energy Transportation Control Systems/Robotics Other By Regions, this report covers (we can add the regions/countries as you want) North America China Europe Southeast Asia Japan India Global Industrial Internet-of-Things Market Professional Survey Report 2016 1 Industry Overview of Industrial Internet-of-Things 1.1 Definition and Specifications of Industrial Internet-of-Things 1.1.1 Definition of Industrial Internet-of-Things 1.1.2 Specifications of Industrial Internet-of-Things 1.2 Classification of Industrial Internet-of-Things 1.2.1 Type I 1.2.2 Type II 1.2.3 Type III 1.3 Applications of Industrial Internet-of-Things 1.3.1 Aerospace & Defense 1.3.2 Healthcare 1.3.3 Energy 1.3.4 Transportation 1.3.5 Control Systems/Robotics 1.3.6 Other 1.4 Market Segment by Regions 1.4.1 North America 1.4.2 China 1.4.3 Europe 1.4.4 Southeast Asia 1.4.5 Japan 1.4.6 India 2 Manufacturing Cost Structure Analysis of Industrial Internet-of-Things 2.1 Raw Material and Suppliers 2.2 Manufacturing Cost Structure Analysis of Industrial Internet-of-Things 2.3 Manufacturing Process Analysis of Industrial Internet-of-Things 2.4 Industry Chain Structure of Industrial Internet-of-Things 3 Technical Data and Manufacturing Plants Analysis of Industrial Internet-of-Things 3.1 Capacity and Commercial Production Date of Global Industrial Internet-of-Things Major Manufacturers in 2015 3.2 Manufacturing Plants Distribution of Global Industrial Internet-of-Things Major Manufacturers in 2015 3.3 R&D Status and Technology Source of Global Industrial Internet-of-Things Major Manufacturers in 2015 3.4 Raw Materials Sources Analysis of Global Industrial Internet-of-Things Major Manufacturers in 2015 8 Major Manufacturers Analysis of Industrial Internet-of-Things 8.1 IBM 8.1.1 Company Profile 8.1.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.1.2.1 Type I 8.1.2.2 Type II 8.1.2.3 Type III 8.1.3 IBM 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.1.4 IBM 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.2 Intel 8.2.1 Company Profile 8.2.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.2.2.1 Type I 8.2.2.2 Type II 8.2.2.3 Type III 8.2.3 Intel 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.2.4 Intel 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.3 Accenture 8.3.1 Company Profile 8.3.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.3.2.1 Type I 8.3.2.2 Type II 8.3.2.3 Type III 8.3.3 Accenture 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.3.4 Accenture 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.4 Cisco 8.4.1 Company Profile 8.4.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.4.2.1 Type I 8.4.2.2 Type II 8.4.2.3 Type III 8.4.3 Cisco 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.4.4 Cisco 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.5 GE 8.5.1 Company Profile 8.5.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.5.2.1 Type I 8.5.2.2 Type II 8.5.2.3 Type III 8.5.3 GE 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.5.4 GE 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.6 AT&T 8.6.1 Company Profile 8.6.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.6.2.1 Type I 8.6.2.2 Type II 8.6.2.3 Type III 8.6.3 AT&T 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.6.4 AT&T 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.7 Amazon 8.7.1 Company Profile 8.7.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.7.2.1 Type I 8.7.2.2 Type II 8.7.2.3 Type III 8.7.3 Amazon 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.7.4 Amazon 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.8 Pivotal 8.8.1 Company Profile 8.8.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.8.2.1 Type I 8.8.2.2 Type II 8.8.2.3 Type III 8.8.3 Pivotal 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.8.4 Pivotal 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.9 Seeq 8.9.1 Company Profile 8.9.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.9.2.1 Type I 8.9.2.2 Type II 8.9.2.3 Type III 8.9.3 Seeq 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.9.4 Seeq 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.10 TempoDB 8.10.1 Company Profile 8.10.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.10.2.1 Type I 8.10.2.2 Type II 8.10.2.3 Type III 8.10.3 TempoDB 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.10.4 TempoDB 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.11 RTI 8.11.1 Company Profile 8.11.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.11.2.1 Type I 8.11.2.2 Type II 8.11.2.3 Type III 8.11.3 RTI 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.11.4 RTI 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.12 Google 8.12.1 Company Profile 8.12.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.12.2.1 Type I 8.12.2.2 Type II 8.12.2.3 Type III 8.12.3 Google 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.12.4 Google 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.13 Omron 8.13.1 Company Profile 8.13.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.13.2.1 Type I 8.13.2.2 Type II 8.13.2.3 Type III 8.13.3 Omron 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.13.4 Omron 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.14 DataLogic 8.14.1 Company Profile 8.14.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.14.2.1 Type I 8.14.2.2 Type II 8.14.2.3 Type III 8.14.3 DataLogic 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.14.4 DataLogic 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.15 Emerson 8.15.1 Company Profile 8.15.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.15.2.1 Type I 8.15.2.2 Type II 8.15.2.3 Type III 8.15.3 Emerson 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.15.4 Emerson 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.16 BlackBerry 8.16.1 Company Profile 8.16.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.16.2.1 Type I 8.16.2.2 Type II 8.16.2.3 Type III 8.16.3 BlackBerry 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.16.4 BlackBerry 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.17 Rockwell Automation 8.17.1 Company Profile 8.17.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.17.2.1 Type I 8.17.2.2 Type II 8.17.2.3 Type III 8.17.3 Rockwell Automation 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.17.4 Rockwell Automation 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Business Region Distribution Analysis 8.18 Apple 8.18.1 Company Profile 8.18.2 Product Picture and Specifications 8.18.2.1 Type I 8.18.2.2 Type II 8.18.2.3 Type III 8.18.3 Apple 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Sales, Ex-factory Price, Revenue, Gross Margin Analysis 8.18.4 Apple 2015 Industrial Internet-of-Things Business Region Distribution Analysis For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/655387-global-industrial-internet-of-things-market-professional-survey-report-2016

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