Goncalo Moniz Research Center

Salvador, Brazil

Goncalo Moniz Research Center

Salvador, Brazil
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Witchell T.D.,University of Victoria | Eshghi A.,University of Victoria | Nally J.E.,University College Dublin | Hof R.,University of Victoria | And 6 more authors.
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases | Year: 2014

Background:Leptospirosis, a re-emerging disease of global importance caused by pathogenic Leptospira spp., is considered the world's most widespread zoonotic disease. Rats serve as asymptomatic carriers of pathogenic Leptospira and are critical for disease spread. In such reservoir hosts, leptospires colonize the kidney, are shed in the urine, persist in fresh water and gain access to a new mammalian host through breaches in the skin.Methodology/Principal Findings:Previous studies have provided evidence for post-translational modification (PTM) of leptospiral proteins. In the current study, we used proteomic analyses to determine the presence of PTMs on the highly abundant leptospiral protein, LipL32, from rat urine-isolated L. interrogans serovar Copenhageni compared to in vitro-grown organisms. We observed either acetylation or tri-methylation of lysine residues within multiple LipL32 peptides, including peptides corresponding to regions of LipL32 previously identified as epitopes. Intriguingly, the PTMs were unique to the LipL32 peptides originating from in vivo relative to in vitro grown leptospires. The identity of each modified lysine residue was confirmed by fragmentation pattern analysis of the peptide mass spectra. A synthetic peptide containing an identified tri-methylated lysine, which corresponds to a previously identified LipL32 epitope, demonstrated significantly reduced immunoreactivity with serum collected from leptospirosis patients compared to the peptide version lacking the tri-methylation. Further, a subset of the identified PTMs are in close proximity to the established calcium-binding and putative collagen-binding sites that have been identified within LipL32.Conclusions/Significance:The exclusive detection of PTMs on lysine residues within LipL32 from in vivo-isolated L. interrogans implies that infection-generated modification of leptospiral proteins may have a biologically relevant function during the course of infection. Although definitive determination of the role of these PTMs must await further investigations, the reduced immune recognition of a modified LipL32 epitope suggests the intriguing possibility that LipL32 modification represents a novel mechanism of immune evasion within Leptospira. © 2014.


PubMed | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, McGill University, Carmel Medical Center and 6 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America | Year: 2016

It is important to realize that leishmaniasis guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. The IDSA and ASTMH consider adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determinations regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patients individual circumstances.


PubMed | Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, McGill University, Carmel Medical Center and 6 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America | Year: 2016

It is important to realize that leishmaniasis guidelines cannot always account for individual variation among patients. They are not intended to supplant physician judgment with respect to particular patients or special clinical situations. The IDSA and ASTMH consider adherence to these guidelines to be voluntary, with the ultimate determinations regarding their application to be made by the physician in the light of each patients individual circumstances.


PubMed | State University of Southwest Bahia, Iguaçu University, Goncalo Moniz Research Center and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Type: Clinical Trial | Journal: Journal of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system : JRAAS | Year: 2015

The association of ACE I/D polymorphism and hemodynamic response to exercise have been limited to primarily aerobic exercises. We hypothesized that D allele carriers would show greater hemodynamic response to resistance exercise, as has been observed with aerobic. This study aimed to investigate the association of ACE I/D polymorphism and hemodynamic (blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR) and rate-pressure product (RPP)) response to resistance exercise in young healthy subjects.ACE I/D polymorphisms were studied by PCR analysis from 75 healthy men. Subjects completed a resistance exercise session of three sets of 10 knee extension repetitions with loads of 50, 75 and 100% of 10RM and two-minute rest intervals. Hemodynamic measures were recorded before and immediately after each set. Analysis of variance was used to identify significant differences among ACE genotypes.ACE I/D polymorphism is associated with hemodynamic response to resistance exercise, as healthy subjects with ACE D allele were prone to higher responses. In addition, this phenotypic difference seems to be a load-dependent trend.ACE DD carriers exhibit greater heart work during resistance exercise. Future studies should focus on the influence of resistance training period with different workloads on the hemodynamic response in healthy individuals with different ACE genotypes.


Andrade R.C.P.,Federal University of Bahia | Neto J.A.,Federal University of Bahia | Andrade L.,Federal University of Bahia | Oliveira T.S.,Federal University of Bahia | And 5 more authors.
Urology | Year: 2016

Objective To evaluate the efficacy of physiotherapy for urinary manifestations in patients with human T-lymphotropic virus 1-associated lower urinary tract dysfunction. Methods Open clinical trial was conducted with 21 patients attending the physiotherapy clinic of the Hospital Universitário, Bahia, Brazil. Combinations of behavioral therapy, perineal exercises, and intravaginal or intra-anal electrical stimulation were used. Results The mean age was 54 ± 12 years and 67% were female. After treatment, there was an improvement in symptoms of urinary urgency, frequency, incontinence, nocturia, and in the sensation of incomplete emptying (P <.001). There was also a reduction in the overactive bladder symptom score from 10 ± 4 to 6 ± 3 (P <.001) and an increase in the perineal muscle strength (P <.001). The urodynamic parameters improved, with reduction in the frequency of patients with detrusor hyperactivity from 57.9% to 42.1%, detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia from 31.6% to 5.3%, detrusor hypocontractility from 15.8% to 0%, and detrusor areflexia from 10.5% to 0%, with positive repercussions in the quality of life in all patients. Conclusion Physiotherapy was effective in cases of human T-lymphotropic virus 1-associated neurogenic bladder, reducing symptoms, increasing perineal muscle strength, and improving urodynamic parameters and quality of life. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.


Barbosa V.L.C.,Federal University of Bahia | Andrade Z.A.,Goncalo Moniz Research Center
Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical | Year: 2010

Introduction: Septal fibrosis of the liver regularly develops in rats infected with the nematode Capillaria hepatica. Curative treatment of the infection prevents the development of septal fibrosis when intervention occurs up to postinfection day (PID) 15, but not later. The present investigation aimed to demonstrate which parasitic factors are present when the process of septal fibrosis can no longer be prevented by curative treatment. Methods: Wistar rats were infected with 600 embryonated eggs of C. hepatica administered by gavage and treated with ivermectin and mebendazole in separate groups at PIDs 10, 12, 15, 17 or 20. Rats from each group and their nontreated controls, were killed and examined 40 days after the end of treatment. Results: Findings by PID 15 were compatible with the stage of complete maturation of infection, when worms and eggs were fully developed and a complex host-parasite multifocal necroinflammatory reaction showed greater intensity, but with no signs of septal fibrosis, which appeared from PID 17 onward. Conclusions: Since the wormsspontaneously died by PID 15, not only septal fibrosis production, but also its maintenance and further development appeared dependent on the presence of eggs, which were the only parasitic factor remaining thereafter.


Pitanga T.N.,Goncalo Moniz Research Center | Pitanga T.N.,Federal University of Bahia | de Aragao Franca L.,Goncalo Moniz Research Center | Rocha V.C.J.,Goncalo Moniz Research Center | And 7 more authors.
BMC Cell Biology | Year: 2014

Background: Upon activation neutrophil releases microparticles - small plasma membrane vesicles that contain cell surface proteins and cytoplasmic matter, with biological activities. In this study we investigated the potential role of myeloperoxidase in the endothelial cell injury caused by neutrophil-derived microparticles.Results: Microparticles were produced by activating human neutrophils with a calcium ionophore and characterized by flow cytometry and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Myeloperoxidase activity was measured by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Neutrophil microparticles-induced injuries and morphological alterations in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were evaluated by microscopy and flow cytometry. Neutrophil microparticles were characterized as structures bounded by lipid bilayers and were less than 1 μm in diameter. The microparticles also expressed CD66b, CD62L and myeloperoxidase, which are all commonly expressed on the surface of neutrophils, as well as exposition of phosphatidylserine. The activity of the myeloperoxidase present on the microparticles was confirmed by hypochlorous acid detection. This compound is only catalyzed by myeloperoxidase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and chloride ion. The addition of sodium azide or taurine inhibited and reduced enzymatic activity, respectively. Exposure of HUVEC to neutrophil microparticles induced a loss of cell membrane integrity and morphological changes. The addition of sodium azide or myeloperoxidase-specific inhibitor-I consistently reduced the injury to the endothelial cells. Taurine addition reduced HUVEC morphological changes.Conclusions: We have demonstrated the presence of active myeloperoxidase in neutrophil microparticles and that the microparticle-associated myeloperoxidase cause injury to endothelial cells. Hence, the microparticle-associated myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system may contribute to widespread endothelial cell damage in conditions of neutrophil activation as observed in vasculitis and sepsis. © 2014 Pitanga et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


PubMed | University of Franca, São Paulo State University and Goncalo Moniz Research Center
Type: | Journal: Carbohydrate polymers | Year: 2015

Bacterial cellulose (BC) and silk fibroin (SF) are natural biopolymers successfully applied in tissue engineering and biomedical fields. In this work nanocomposites based on BC and SF were prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). In addition, the investigation of cytocompatibility was done by MTT, XTT and Trypan Blue dye technique. Cellular adhesion and proliferation were detected additionally. The evaluation of genotoxicity was realized by micronucleus assay. In vitro tests showed that the material is non-cytotoxic or genotoxic. SEM images revealed a greater number of cells attached at the BC/SF:50% scaffold surface than the pure BC one, suggesting that the presence of fibroin improved cell attachment. This could be related to the SF amino acid sequence that acts as cell receptors facilitating cell adhesion and growth. Consequently, BC/SF:50% scaffolds configured an excellent option in bioengineering depicting its potential for tissue regeneration and cultivation of cells on nanocomposites.


PubMed | Goncalo Moniz Research Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International urology and nephrology | Year: 2015

In order to describe epidemiological and pathological features of penile cancer in a high-risk area of Brazil.We reviewed the experience (378 patients from 1997 to 2007) of Hospital Aristides Maltez from Salvador, Bahia-the main institution in the state which provides oncologic treatment for penile cancer in the public health system.The present series showed a high rate (17 %) of patients less than 40 years at the time of diagnosis. Cancer-specific death rate in this age group was 19 % (in contrast to 11 and 13 % in the 41-60 and >60 age groups). Squamous cell carcinomas in younger patients were also more likely to exhibit infiltrative growth pattern, perineural invasion, and recurrence.Regardless of tumor subtypes, penile carcinoma in Northeastern Brazil had more aggressive features and behavior when presented at younger age. This observation should be confirmed in other large series from endemic areas of penile cancer.


PubMed | Goncalo Moniz Research Center
Type: | Journal: BMC cell biology | Year: 2014

Upon activation neutrophil releases microparticles - small plasma membrane vesicles that contain cell surface proteins and cytoplasmic matter, with biological activities. In this study we investigated the potential role of myeloperoxidase in the endothelial cell injury caused by neutrophil-derived microparticles.Microparticles were produced by activating human neutrophils with a calcium ionophore and characterized by flow cytometry and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Myeloperoxidase activity was measured by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Neutrophil microparticles-induced injuries and morphological alterations in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were evaluated by microscopy and flow cytometry. Neutrophil microparticles were characterized as structures bounded by lipid bilayers and were less than 1m in diameter. The microparticles also expressed CD66b, CD62L and myeloperoxidase, which are all commonly expressed on the surface of neutrophils, as well as exposition of phosphatidylserine. The activity of the myeloperoxidase present on the microparticles was confirmed by hypochlorous acid detection. This compound is only catalyzed by myeloperoxidase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and chloride ion. The addition of sodium azide or taurine inhibited and reduced enzymatic activity, respectively. Exposure of HUVEC to neutrophil microparticles induced a loss of cell membrane integrity and morphological changes. The addition of sodium azide or myeloperoxidase-specific inhibitor-I consistently reduced the injury to the endothelial cells. Taurine addition reduced HUVEC morphological changes.We have demonstrated the presence of active myeloperoxidase in neutrophil microparticles and that the microparticle-associated myeloperoxidase cause injury to endothelial cells. Hence, the microparticle-associated myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system may contribute to widespread endothelial cell damage in conditions of neutrophil activation as observed in vasculitis and sepsis.

Loading Goncalo Moniz Research Center collaborators
Loading Goncalo Moniz Research Center collaborators