Francisco I. Madero, Mexico
Francisco I. Madero, Mexico

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Perez-Hernandez I.,Golfo University | Ochoa-Gaona S.,Colegio de Mexico | Adams R.H.,Juarez Autonomous University of Tabasco | Rivera-Cruz M.C.,Colegio de Mexico | And 5 more authors.
Environmental Science and Pollution Research | Year: 2016

Under greenhouse conditions, we evaluated establishment of four tree species and their capacity to degrade crude oil recently incorporated into the soil; the species were as follows: Cedrela odorata (tropical cedar), Haematoxylum campechianum (tinto bush), Swietenia macrophylla (mahogany), and Tabebuia rosea (macuilis). Three-month-old plants were planted in soil with three treatments of heavy petroleum and a control (C0 0 mg kg−1; C1 18,000 mg kg−1; C2 31,700 mg kg−1; C3 47,100 mg kg−1) with four repetitions per treatment and species; the experiment was carried out for 245 days. Height and biomass of all species significantly diminished as petroleum concentration increased, although plant survival was not affected. The quantity of colony-forming units (CFU) of rhizospheric bacteria varied among tree species and treatments; petroleum stimulated bacterial CFU for S. macrophylla. The number of fungi CFU for S. macrophylla and T. rosea was significantly greater in C0 than in soil with petroleum, but among species and among different concentrations, no significant differences were found. The greatest percentage of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) degradation was found in C1 for soil without plants (45 %). Differences from the remaining treatments (petroleum concentrations in soil and plant species) were not significant (P < 0.05). Among all trees, H. campechianum had the greatest TPH degradation (32.5 % in C2). T. rosea (C1) and H. campechianum (C2) resulted in petroleum degradation at levels ranging from 20.5 to 32.5 %. On the basis of this experiment, the tree species used did not improve TPH degradation. However, all of them showed high rates of survival and vigor. So, as tree species provide goods and services, experiments with inoculation of hydrocarbonclastic microorganisms, addition of fertilizers, and mixture of tree and grasses are recommended. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg


PubMed | Wageningen University, Golfo University, Juarez Autonomous University of Tabasco, Instituto Tecnológico de Tuxtla Gutierrez and Colegio de Mexico
Type: | Journal: Environmental science and pollution research international | Year: 2016

Under greenhouse conditions, we evaluated establishment of four tree species and their capacity to degrade crude oil recently incorporated into the soil; the species were as follows: Cedrela odorata (tropical cedar), Haematoxylum campechianum (tinto bush), Swietenia macrophylla (mahogany), and Tabebuia rosea (macuilis). Three-month-old plants were planted in soil with three treatments of heavy petroleum and a control (C0 0mgkg


Bussa M.,Golfo University | Guttilla D.,Golfo University | Lucia M.,Cervello | Mascaro A.,Catholic University Medical School | Rinaldi S.,University of Rome La Sapienza
Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica | Year: 2015

Background Complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS I), formerly known as reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), is a chronic painful disorder that usually develops after a minor injury to a limb. This topical review gives a synopsis of CRPS I and discusses the current concepts of our understanding of CRPS I in adults, the diagnosis, and treatment options based on the limited evidence found in medical literature. CRPS I is a multifactorial disorder. Possible pathophysiological mechanisms of CRPS I are classic and neurogenic inflammation, and maladaptive neuroplasticity. At the level of the central nervous system, it has been suggested that an increased input from peripheral nociceptors alters the central processing mechanisms. Methods A literature search was conducted using, as electronic bibliographic database, Medline from 1980 until 2014. Results An early diagnosis and multidisciplinary treatment are necessary to prevent permanent disability. Conclusions The pharmacological treatment of CRPS I is empirical and insufficiently effective. Further research is needed regarding the therapeutic modalities discussed in the guidelines. Physical therapy is widely recommended as a first-line treatment. The efficacy of local anesthetic sympathetic blockade as treatment for CRPS I is questionable. © 2015 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley and Sons Ltd.


Vanoye-Eligio V.,Golfo University | Barrientos-Lozano L.,Technological Institute of Ciudad Victoria | Perez-Castaneda R.,National Autonomous University of Mexico | Gaona-Garcia G.,Golfo University | Lara-Villalon M.,Golfo University
Neotropical Entomology | Year: 2015

An analysis of adult population fluctuation of Anastrepha ludens (Loew) was performed in southern Tamaulipas, Mexico from 2008 to 2011. The aim was to analyze population dynamics of A. ludens and its relationships with climatic factors in the citrus region of Llera, Tamaulipas, Mexico. Population densities were weekly examined to identify variation through the year and study period. Four periods were identified according to population size, amplitude, host availability and season of the year. The correlation between population density vs. rainfall and temperature (average, minimum and maximum) was determined by linear and multiple regression analyses. Simple linear regression analysis showed that population density with minimum temperature and rainfall was the most consistent correlation, whereas in multiple regression analysis, rainfall and maximum temperature showed more consistency. A seasonal association between the availability of commercial host, climatic variation, and population peaks of A. ludens was determined. This study may have practical implications for the design of specific control strategies, monitoring, and infestation prevention based on different phases of the pest through the year. This strategy, along with the area-wide approach implemented by the Plant Protection Service may lead to an optimization of material, financial and human resources. © 2015, Sociedade Entomológica do Brasil.


PubMed | Golfo University, National Autonomous University of Mexico and Technological Institute of Ciudad Victoria
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Neotropical entomology | Year: 2015

An analysis of adult population fluctuation of Anastrepha ludens (Loew) was performed in southern Tamaulipas, Mexico from 2008 to 2011. The aim was to analyze population dynamics of A. ludens and its relationships with climatic factors in the citrus region of Llera, Tamaulipas, Mexico. Population densities were weekly examined to identify variation through the year and study period. Four periods were identified according to population size, amplitude, host availability and season of the year. The correlation between population density vs. rainfall and temperature (average, minimum and maximum) was determined by linear and multiple regression analyses. Simple linear regression analysis showed that population density with minimum temperature and rainfall was the most consistent correlation, whereas in multiple regression analysis, rainfall and maximum temperature showed more consistency. A seasonal association between the availability of commercial host, climatic variation, and population peaks of A. ludens was determined. This study may have practical implications for the design of specific control strategies, monitoring, and infestation prevention based on different phases of the pest through the year. This strategy, along with the area-wide approach implemented by the Plant Protection Service may lead to an optimization of material, financial and human resources.


Corella justavino F.,Golfo University | Jimenez ramirez R.,Golfo University | Meza perez N.,Golfo University | Borz S.A.,Transilvania University of Brasov
Bulletin of the Transilvania University of Brasov, Series II: Forestry, Wood Industry, Agricultural Food Engineering | Year: 2015

It is widely accepted that forest operations are both difficult and hazardous activities. During their activity, forest workers are required to take uncomfortable postures, exposing themselves to risks of musculoskeletal injuries and disorders. Hence, evaluations are needed to improve their operational behaviour and ergonomics. One way to assess the work postures consists in implementing the Ovako Working posture Assessment System (OWAS) that has the advance of a rapid yet full body postural assessment. However, in forest operations, one may deal with some specific situations that should be carefully analyzed. This paper describes the advantages and limitations that the use of such a system may have, through a series of case studies, based on snapshots extracted from video files, as this particular approach may be specific to forest operations.


Ramirez-De-Leon E.D.,Golfo University | Garcia-Alcocer E.A.,Golfo University | Torres-Martinez N.,Golfo University | Chavez-Bosquez O.A.,Juarez Autonomous University of Tabasco | Francisco-Leon J.J.,Juarez Autonomous University of Tabasco
2014 IEEE Biennial Congress of Argentina, ARGENCON 2014 | Year: 2014

Since the conception of the Java Modeling Language (JML), many tools, applications and implementations have been done for its support. In this context, the users or developers who want to use JML seem surrounded by many of these tools, applications and so on. Looking for a common infrastructure and an independent language to provide a bridge between these tools and JML, it was developed an approach to embedded contracts in the eXtensible Markup Language (XML) for Java: XJML. XJML claims to offer you the ability to separate preconditions, posconditions and class invariants using JML and XML, and then execute Runtime Assertion Checking (RAC), Extended Static Checking (ESC) and/or Full Static Program Verification (FSPV). In this work, we present some experiments and results with XJML and Runtime Assertion Checking, using one Java class. © 2014 IEEE.


Vazquez-Luna D.,Golfo University
Ecological Indicators | Year: 2015

This study evaluated the toxic effects of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) on growth of the legumes Crotalaria incana L. and Leucaena leucocephala Lam., and on the development of nitrogen-fixing soil microorganisms, using biological toxicity indices and the toxicity potential index (TPIc), which enable comparison of effects of exposure time and concentration. Growth and biomass accumulation in both plant species decreased with high pollutant concentrations. The EC50 and the NOEC were not identified for either species. The Phytotoxicity Relative Index showed that root length was most strongly affected by the oil, and the Impact Index on Nitrogen Fixer Microorganisms indicated that, despite damage to the root system, L. leucocephala rhizosphere bacteria doubled at 10,000 mg kg-1 TPH after of 240 days of exposure. Finally, the TPIc revealed that C. incana was more sensitive than L. leucocephala to chronic TPH toxicity and might strongly depend on beneficial soil bacteria. © 2015 Published by Elsevier Ltd.


Perez-Hernandez G.,CINVESTAV | Perez-Hernandez G.,Golfo University | Vega-Poot A.,CINVESTAV | Perez-Juarez I.,CINVESTAV | And 5 more authors.
Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells | Year: 2012

ZnO is a promising material for application in dye-sensitized solar cells, related to its attractive electrical properties and the facile preparation of nanomaterials, with excellent control over the structure and morphology. In this work ZnO-based dye-sensitized solar cells were prepared, and the effect of the presence of a compact ZnO interlayer between the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) electrode and the nanostructured, mesoporous ZnO film on the performance of the solar cell is reported. The compact interlayer was deposited using planar rf magnetron sputtering, and the ZnO nanomaterial was prepared by forced hydrolysis from zinc acetate in ethanol solution. The presence of the compact interlayer has a positive effect on the overall characteristics of the solar cell and decreases the recombination rate from the TCO substrate, resulting in a higher open circuit voltage under low light conditions. The best efficiency of non-optimized solar cells at 1 sun was 4.0%. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Golfo University
Type: | Journal: Neotropical entomology | Year: 2017

The Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens Loew (Diptera: Tephritidae), is one of the most important pests of citrus in Mexico. We report the results of an analysis of A. ludens populations that inhabit the semi-arid highlands of the Sierra Madre Oriental in northeastern Mexico. This study aimed to provide information on population fluctuation of A. ludens and how it relates to climate variables, as well as insights into habitat and native parasitoids. Population peaked in the period July-November when ripe fruits of the wild host, Casimiroa pubescens Ramrez, were available. No adults were captured the rest of the year, suggesting that high populations depend on the availability of wild host fruit. No significant relationships between population fluctuation and climatic variables were observed, except for minimum temperature. Fruit samples of citron (Citrus medica L.), pomegranate (Punica granatum L.), and C. pubescens were collected to determine degree of infestation. Infestation levels (pupae/g) ranged between 0.0006 for citron, 0.0047 for pomegranate, and 0.0240 for C. pubescens. A native parasitoid of Tephritidae, Doryctobracon crawfordii (Viereck) (Braconidae), was identified. Parasitism percentage was calculated at 12.5% on C. pubescens fruits. No parasitoids were observed on citron or pomegranate fruit samples. These results contribute to knowledge on behavior of A. ludens native to temperate environments where no commercial hosts are available. Further research on host expansion of this pest in light of scenarios of global climate change is suggested.

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