Toronto, Canada
Toronto, Canada

Golder Associates is an employee-owned, global company providing consulting, design, and construction services in earth, environment, and related areas of energy. Its more than 8,000 employees operate from more than 180 offices in Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe, North America and South America. Golder serves the manufacturing, mining, oil and gas, power, urban development and infrastructure sectors. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME | Phase: SME-2013-1 | Award Amount: 1.59M | Year: 2013

Bioremediation the use of certain biological agents to remove or neutralize contaminants from polluted soil or water is a rapidly advancing field and the technology has been applied successfully to remediate many contaminated sites. Effective monitoring of biological processes is a necessary component of any bioremediation application. Currently, the influence of the remediation process is monitored by taking samples from contaminated sites and analysing them remotely, which takes a lot of time, and costs significant amounts of money. By integrating online, real time on-the-field monitoring and control systems into the remediation process, the overall time and cost of remediation can be decreased significantly. The proposed project intends to build on recent advancements in the fields of sensor and low-cost wireless technology to address the need of a system for continuous monitoring the bioremediation processes. The aim of the project is to develop a flexible and expandable, low cost online system for detecting subsurface microbial events allowing autonomous control and remote adjustment of the remediation process. The project objectives include the development of new generation of biosensors with ultra-low power consumption for the detection of aromatic compounds low-cost, self-sustaining and expandable wireless communication system a treatment unit with autonomous control and remote adjustment and the integration of the obtained data with pre-existing data analysis systems. SMEs involved in bioremediation will possess a low-cost system enabling the continuous monitoring, autonomous control and remote adjustment of the microbial processes at the contaminated sites, which reduces operational costs and shortens response time.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: Fission-2009-1.1.1 | Award Amount: 6.53M | Year: 2010

The main aim of the project PEBS (Long-term Performance of the Engineered Barrier System) is to evaluate the sealing and barrier performance of the EBS with time, through development of a comprehensive approach involving experiments, model development and consideration of the potential impacts on long-term safety functions. The experiments and models cover the full range of conditions from initial emplacement of wastes (high heat generation and EBS resaturation) through to later stage establishment of near steady-state conditions, i.e. full resaturation and thermal equilibrium with the host rock. These aspects will be integrated in a manner that will lead to a more convincing connection between the initial transient state of the EBS and its long-term state that provides the required isolation of the wastes. The work proposed within the project builds on existing knowledge and experience generated during recent years and supported by ongoing nat. and EC research programmes. The project pretends to provide a more complete description of the THM and THM-C (thermo-hydromechanical-chemical) evolution of the EBS system, a more quantitative basis for relating the evolutionary behaviour to the safety functions of the system and a further clarification of the significance of residual uncertainties for long-term performance assessment. The importance of uncertainties arising from potential disagreement between the process models and the laboratory and in situ experiments to be performed within PEBS, and their implications for extrapolation of results will be reviewed, with particular emphasis on possible impacts on safety functions. In addition to the scientific-tech. aim, the consortium will spread the essential results to the european scientific community and Canada, Japan and China, use its expertise for public information purposes, and promote knowledge and technology transfer through training. WP 5 brings together activities concerning dissemination and training.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2013.6.1.1 | Award Amount: 4.10M | Year: 2013

The main objective of the proposed project is to develop a generic UCG-CCS site characterisation workflow, and the accompanying technologies, which would address the dilemma faced by the proponents of reactor zone CO2 storage, and offer technological solutions to source sink mismatch issues that are likely to be faced in many coalfields. This objective will be achieved through integrated research into the field based technology knowledge gaps, such as cavity progression and geomechanics, potential groundwater contamination and subsidence impacts, together with research into process engineering solutions in order to assess the role/impact of site specific factors (coal type, depth/pressure, thickness, roof and floor rock strata, hydrology) and selected reagents on the operability of a given CO2 emission mitigation option in a coalfield. CO2 storage capacity on site for European and international UCG resources will be assessed and CO2 mitigation technologies based on end use of produced synthetic gas will be evaluated. The technology options identified will be evaluated with respect to local and full chain Life Cycle environmental impacts and costs. The project takes a radical and holistic approach to coupled UCG-CCS, and thus the site selection criteria for the coupled process, considering different end-uses of the produced synthetic gas, covering other options beyond power generation, and will evaluate novel approaches to UCG reagent use in order to optimise the whole process. This approach aims at minimising the need for on-site CO2 storage capacity as well as maximising the economic yield of UCG through value added end products, as well as power generation, depending on the local coalfield and geological conditions.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP.2012.1.2-1 | Award Amount: 14.00M | Year: 2013

NANOREM is designed to unlock the potential of nanoremediation and so support both the appropriate use of nanotechnology in restoring land and aquifer resources and the development of the knowledge-based economy at a world leading level for the benefit of a wide range of users in the EU environmental sector. NANOREM uniquely takes a holistic approach to examining how the potential for nanoremediation can be developed and applied in practice, to enhance a stronger development of nanoremediation markets and applications in the EU. NANOREMs ambitious objectives are: 1) Identification of the most appropriate nanoremediation technological approaches to achieve a step change in practical remediation performance. Development of lower cost production techniques and production at commercially relevant scales, also for large scale applications. 2) Determination of the mobility and migration potential of nanoparticles in the subsurface, and their potential to cause harm, focusing on the NP types most likely to be adopted into practical use in the EU. 3) Development of a comprehensive tool box for field scale observation of nanoremediation performance and determination of the fate of NPs in the subsurface, including analytical methods, field measurement devices, decision support and numerical tools. 4) Dissemination and dialogue with key stakeholder interests to ensure that research, development and demonstration meets end-user and regulatory requirements and information and knowledge is shared widely across the EU. 5) Provide applications at representative scales including field sites to validate cost, performance, and fate and transport findings. The NANOREM consortium is multidisciplinary, cross-sectoral and transnational. It includes 28 partners from 12 countries organized in 11 work packages. The consortium includes 18 of the leading nanoremediation research groups in the EU, 10 industry and service providers (8 SMEs) and one organisation with policy and regulatory interest.


Chapman P.M.,Golder Associates
Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science | Year: 2012

Global climate change is a reality that is rendering the concept of 'background conditions' meaningless. We can no longer attempt to maintain the environmental status quo. What we can do is to attempt to maintain ecosystem services despite climate-driven environmental change. There is a pressing need for proactive management that purposefully changes ecosystems to maintain ecosystem services before uncontrolled, detrimental changes occur. Such management would go beyond the bounds of current management efforts and could include, for example, introduction of species, bioengineering, and physical engineering. I suggest that this approach be applied first to coastal lagoons as they are clearly defined geographic areas where this approach can, hopefully, be demonstrated such that it can be applied more widely - when it is accepted, which unfortunately will most probably not occur until the adverse impacts of global climate change become much more apparent. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

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