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News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Golden Gate BPO Solutions, a global provider of customer management and business process outsourcing solutions, announced today it began providing lead generation and customer support for HotelPower.com, an online member-based provider of discounted lodging accommodations ranging from traditional hotels to rental properties. Golden Gate BPO Solutions is servicing this new client from its contact center partner in Montego Bay, Jamaica. Stephen B. Ferber, CEO of Golden Gate BPO Solutions, stated, “The partnership between Golden Gate BPO and HotelPower.com is indicative of our company’s expertise in the travel space and customer relationship management, from sales and service to customer retention. HotelPower.com was established by travel industry leaders from Global Travel International – the 55th Largest Travel Agency in the U.S. according to the Travel Weekly Power List 100 – to bring insider rates and discounts to a wider audience. Their vision and innovative solutions for travelers and strong commitment to customer experience align directly with Golden Gate BPO’s principles. We are proud to be partnering with this outstanding company.” Adds Randy Warren, CEO of HotelPower.com, “Golden Gate BPO Solutions is a unique provider in the outsourcing space – one that can provide us with customized, goal-oriented solutions for our customer service needs as well as the utmost in relationship management through full immersion with our organization and its culture. This is an approach we found extremely appealing in our search, and Golden Gate BPO was the one outsourced contact center company that could offer this high-touch level of service we require. We believe in their standards of creating the most positive customer experience, and we’re excited for them to be a part of our team to help service and grow our business.” Founded in 2006, Golden Gate BPO Solutions provides multi-channel contact center management, customer engagement and business process outsourcing services. We offer a unique and effective call center outsourcing alternative that provides our clients with a high touch client-service provider relationship. Our outsourced call center alternative yields world-class customer care, technical support and sales along with the full spectrum of outsourcing functions required to serve clients’ customers. Our customer engagement centers are located in the United States, Dominican Republic, Belize, Jamaica, the Philippines and India, from which we offer multi-lingual voice, email, web chat, social media, back-office, online help desk and automated support. Golden Gate BPO Solutions is ranked No. 975 on Inc. magazine’s 35th annual Inc. 5000, the most prestigious ranking of the nation’s fastest-growing private companies. The Inc. 5000 represents a unique look at the most successful companies within the American economy’s most dynamic segment— its independent small businesses. Started in 1982, this prestigious list of the nation’s most successful private companies has become the hallmark of entrepreneurial success. Companies such as Microsoft, Dell, Domino’s Pizza, Pandora, Timberland, LinkedIn, Yelp, Zillow, and many other well-known names gained their first national exposure as honorees of the Inc. 5000. For more information on Golden Gate BPO Solutions, visit http://www.goldengatebpo.com. Hotelpower.com is a recent addition to Global Travel International. Global Travel International is the 55th Largest Travel Agency in the U.S, according to the Travel Weekly Power List 100. Hotelpower.com offers consumers and club members one of the biggest selections and best pricing options of lodging accommodations from traditional hotels to vacation rentals at more than 400,000+ properties worldwide. Member benefits include discounted hotel rates up to 70% off, complimentary upgrades, free breakfasts, late checkout, email alerts for travel specials and access to inventory not available through other online sources. Hotel Power offers discounted hotel stays, only to club members, with rates and availability unlike any other travel website by those in the know – enabling them to save thousands upon thousands of dollars in hotel expenditures.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

SAN RAFAEL, Calif., May 4, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Historic grandeur meets contemporary elegance at "Edgewood" estate, an approximately 8,162-square foot mansion located in the leafy Dominican community of San Rafael, CA. Commissioned in 1907 by Frank Madison of Pillsbury, Madison & Sutro, the iconic home at 120 Mountain View Avenue is listed in the California Register of Historic Resources, offering a rare opportunity to dwell in one of Marin County's most coveted enclaves just 20 minutes' drive from San Francisco. Most recently featured in the Selena Gomez-produced Netflix series "13 Reasons Why", the estate features a list of amenities to die for: Bay Region Tudor architecture, seven bedrooms, six fireplaces (one from Suite 310 at the Plaza Hotel NYC), a saltwater pool and 833-square foot pool house, a 400+ year old Augé stone fountain from St. Tropez, 14-zone Control 4 sound system, bocce court and a life-sized outdoor chess board, to name a few.


Trademark
Golden Gate | Date: 2017-01-18

Fixed blade knives; Folding knives; Hunting knives; Pocket knives.


Trademark
Golden Gate | Date: 2016-11-16

Clothing. Providing a website featuring health information regarding medical cannabis strains, therapeutic uses, indications, and effects of medical cannabis; Online medical cannabis resources, namely, providing online resources featuring medical information pertaining to medicinal cannabis; Providing online information, news, and commentary in the field of health, wellness, health benefits of medical cannabis, and nutrition; Providing a website featuring information in the field of health, wellness, health benefits of medical cannabis, and nutrition.


Patent
Golden Gate | Date: 2013-01-25

Combination ski-snowboard devices reversibly configured in both: a ski configuration comprising two skis each with both an inside and outside edge and a ski binding mounting systems, and in a snowboard configuration having two outside edges and two binding mounting systems. Methods for converting ski-snowboard devices from a snowboard configuration to a ski configuration and from a ski configuration to a snowboard configuration.


News Article | November 16, 2016
Site: www.reuters.com

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - The investment arm of Koch Industries, the industrial conglomerate of the billionaire Koch brothers, is spending more than $2 billion to take a significant stake in enterprise software provider Infor, the companies said on Wednesday.


News Article | November 12, 2016
Site: www.reuters.com

(Reuters) - The private investment arm of Koch Industries, the industrial conglomerate of the billionaire Koch brothers, is nearing a deal to acquire a significant minority stake in Infor Inc that will value the business software company at roughly $10 billion, according to people familiar with the matter.


News Article | July 1, 2015
Site: www.cnet.com

As the title suggests, "Terminator: Genisys" goes back to the beginning of the much-loved machine-battling series. Unfortunately, "Genisys" may have borrowed the earlier films' clothes, boots and motorcycle, but it's a still cold metal frame with barely-convincing skin stretched over it. Released in 1984, B-movie "The Terminator" made stars of wonkily-accented muscleman Arnold Schwarzenegger and director James Cameron. They re-teamed in 1992 to create "Terminator 2: Judgment Day", combining cutting-edge computer effects, heart-in-mouth action, a clever plot, compelling characters and endlessly quotable dialogue. So perfect was "T2" that we never really got over it -- revisiting the "Terminator" world for two further sequels and a TV show yielded sadly diminishing returns. In theatres this week, "Genisys" is the latest attempt to reach the dizzy heights of the first two films, this time by explicitly referencing them. We've done our best to avoid spoilers, by the way, but if you want to go into the movie completely fresh then read on at your own risk. And for heck's sake don't watch any other trailers apart from the safe one above, because they spoil a huge and actually pretty cool plot twist. "Terminator: Genisys" opens with civilisation ending in apocalyptic fire and the heroic John Connor leading the last remnants of the human race against robot oppressors. The machines send a robot back through time to terminate Connor's mother Sarah before he's born, so human soldier Kyle Reese follows the android assassin back to 1984 to stop it. But you knew that already. Yes, the first act of "Genisys" literally rehashes the backstory of the first movie. Things finally get into gear when the time-travelling begins, with director Alan Taylor lovingly recreating James Cameron's series-sparking 1984 movie. Only "Genisys" doesn't just rebuild the original movie, it actually steps into the action and starts rearranging the furniture. This isn't a reboot so much as a remix. That leads to an early highlight in which the modern-day, aged Arnie faces off against his younger self, the slab-chested colossus that exploded onto screens a whopping thirty years ago. This is when "Genisys" is at its most imaginative, playfully subverting the established characters and rules of the "Terminator" mythos. Sadly though the CGI in this scene isn't quite up to scratch -- 1984 Arnie looks like the cartoon-sheened and oddly-weightless Hulk of the "Avengers" movies, the fight lacking the bruising physical impact of the machine-on-machine scraps in "T2". This is the problem with "Genisys" in a nutshell: it harks back to the past while adding modern innovation, but ends up smoothing out what made the series so compelling in the first place. Like summer rivals "Jurassic World" or "Mad Max: Fury Road", "Genisys" walks a tough line between appealing to long-time fans and newcomers -- and surely pleases neither. The redundant first act -- a sort of "Previously on the Terminator!" -- might be useful for new viewers, but the constant hat-tipping to previous movies and the nuances of the time-twisting plot are likely to baffle newbies. Compare that to "Mad Max: Fury Road", which does a grand job of building a thrilling new vision within an existing mythos. "Genisys" suffers in comparison with "Fury Road" on the action front too. Where "Fury Road" was wall-to-wall, nail-biting, viscerally authentic carnage, the action scenes in "Genisys" are lacklustre, with none of the imagination, élan or visceral impact of previous "Terminator" movies. The lack of innovation is summed up by the fact we're treated to the cliche of an action scene on San Francisco's Golden Gate bridge, involving a school bus dangling precariously for no apparent reason. It's not just the action that's been smoothed over and all interest removed: the cast are handsome but ruinously dull. Jai Courtney looks like he grew up sipping smoothies in a well-air-conditioned gym, not clinging in stark terror to the scorched ruins of a post-apocalyptic hellscape. As Kyle Reese he lacks any trace of original star Michael Biehn's desperate humanity or sweaty charisma. Emilia Clarke has neither the strength or vulnerability of original star Linda Hamilton, and Jason Clarke brings his one facial expression to yet another blockbuster. The one new entrant to distinguish himself is JK Simmons, who's great but criminally under-used. Inevitably then the star of the show is the big man himself. The most fun on offer is when Arnie is throwing punches, wielding comically-oversized weapons and dispensing stone-faced one-faced-liners. Amusingly, "Genisys" doesn't try to gloss over the unashamedly silver-haired Schwarzenegger's age, instead building it into the story -- even Terminators get old, you guys. Unfortunately he's saddled with a chunk of exposition, mostly about time travel. "Genisys" reminded me of the 2009 "Star Trek", so desperate to make its time-travel conceit work the film ties itself in knots at the expense of narrative momentum. There's endless exposition, the blandly beautiful Courtney and Emilia Clarke exchanging reams of dialogue about the consequences of time travel without ever giving any sense of the stakes. Arnie is left to deadpan the timey-wimey gobbledegook in a fashion that reminded me of the moment in "Austin Powers" where a character just looks into the camera and instructs the audience not to worry about it. Another modern-day touch is that the villainous Skynet is brought into the Internet age. They actually call it the "ultimate killer app", making this the latest Hollywood movie that tries to convince us that smartphones and tablets are evil. We're sleepwalking into extinction at the hands of the machines, we're warned. We should look up from our screens, we're told. Hollywood beseeches us to remember the things that make us human: love, emotional connection...and paying for our media. If you're considering watching in 3D, save your money: there are no fun uses of the three-dimensional effect, and when Taylor decided to ape James Cameron's blue-shadowed palette he forgot that people would be wearing a pair of sunglasses to watch it. Another modern innovation on show is the mid-credits sting. Stick around if you must, but the postscript to "Genisys" is even more crushingly mediocre than the film that precedes it. With more sequels potentially in the works, it seems the "Terminator" series will continue, like a smashed robot refusing to stop crawling on despite its body being destroyed, its red eyes glowing with implacable resolve. This most commercial of franchises can't be reasoned with. It doesn't feel pity, or remorse, or fear. And it absolutely will not stop, ever.


News Article | September 25, 2015
Site: www.wired.com

Cities used to grow by accident. Sure, the location usually made sense—someplace defensible, on a hill or an island, or somewhere near an extractable resource or the confluence of two transport routes. But what happened next was ad hoc. The people who worked in the fort or the mines or the port or the warehouses needed places to eat, to sleep, to worship. Infrastructure threaded through the hustle and bustle—water, sewage, roads, trolleys, gas, electricity—in vast networks of improvisation. You can find planned exceptions: Alexandria, Roman colonial towns, certain districts in major Chinese cities, Haussmann’s Paris. But for the most part it was happenstance, luck, and layering the new on top of the old. At least, that’s the way things worked for most of human history. But around the second decade of the 20th century, things changed. Cities started to happen on purpose. Beginning with New York City’s zoning laws in 1916, development began to occur by commission, not omission. Laws and regulations dictated the shape of the envelope. Functional decisions determined aesthetic outcomes—not always for the best. So let’s jump to now: A century, plus or minus, after human beings started putting their minds toward designing cities as a whole, things are getting good. High tech materials, sensor networks, new science, and better data are all letting architects, designers, and planners work smarter and more precisely. Cities are getting more environmentally sound, more fun, and more beautiful. And just in time, because today more human beings live in cities than not. In this year’s design issue, we’re telling the stories of some of those projects, from the detail of a new streetlight to a sacred city in flux, from masterful museums to infrastructure made for bikes (and the algorithms that run it all). The cities of tomorrow might still self-assemble haltingly, but done right, the process won’t be accidental. A city shouldn’t just happen anymore. Every block, every building, every brick represents innumerable decisions. Decide well, and cities are magic. —Adam Rogers


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