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Gold Coast, Australia

Jiang G.,University of Queensland | Keating A.,University of Queensland | Corrie S.,CWE Corrie Water and Environment | O'halloran K.,Gold Coast City Council | And 2 more authors.
Water Research | Year: 2013

Intermittent dosing of free nitrous acid (FNA), with or without the simultaneous dosing of hydrogen peroxide, is a new strategy developed recently for the control of sulfide production in sewers. Six-month field trials have been carried out in a rising main sewer in Australia (150mm in diameter and 1080m in length) to evaluate the performance of the strategy that was previously demonstrated in laboratory studies. In each trial, FNA was dosed at a pumping station for a period of 8 or 24h, some with simultaneous hydrogen peroxide dosing. The sulfide control effectiveness was monitored by measuring, on-line, the dissolved sulfide concentration at a downstream location of the pipeline (828m from the pumping station) and the gaseous H2S concentration at the discharge manhole. Effective sulfide control was achieved in all nine consecutive trials, with sulfide production reduced by more than 80% in 10 days following each dose. Later trials achieved better control efficiency than the first few trials possibly due to the disrupting effects of FNA on sewer biofilms. This suggests that an initial strong dose (more chemical consumption) followed by maintenance dosing (less chemical consumption) could be a very cost-effective way to achieve consistent control efficiency. It was also found that heavy rainfall slowed the recovery of sulfide production after dosing, likely due to the dilution effects and reduced retention time. Overall, intermittent dose of FNA or FNA in combination with H2O2 was successfully demonstrated to be a cost-effective method for sulfide control in rising main sewers. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Imteaz M.A.,Swinburne University of Technology | Hossain I.,Swinburne University of Technology | Hossain M.I.,Gold Coast City Council
International Journal of Water | Year: 2014

This paper presents calibration of a catchment water quality model for continuous simulation of the water quality parameters from a catchment to the catchment outlet. The model is an integration of two sub-models: The hydrologic model and the water quality model. The hydrologic model estimates the amount of surface water runoff generated from the catchment during the storm event/ events. The water quality model estimates the transportation of the pollutants (total nitrogen, total phosphorus and suspended solids) from a particular catchment. The water quality model integrates two sub-processes: pollutants build-up and pollutants wash-off. The model calculates separate build-up and wash-off from pervious and impervious catchment surfaces. Rainfall and water quality data were collected for the Hotham creek catchment in Gold Coast, Australia. Runoff calculations from hydrologic model were compared with calculated discharges through widely used Australian models WBNM and DRAINS. Finally, based on measured water quality data, model water quality parameters were calibrated for the above-mentioned catchment. Copyright © 2014 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.


Hossain I.,Swinburne University of Technology | Imteaz M.A.,Swinburne University of Technology | Arulrajah A.,Swinburne University of Technology | Hossain M.I.,Gold Coast City Council
International Journal of Water | Year: 2013

This paper presents the development of a one-dimensional stream water quality model for the continuous simulation of suspended sediment transport and deposition processes along a particular stream section. The model integrates stream hydraulics and suspended sediment transport and deposition processes. The stream hydraulic model was developed using the Muskingum-Cunge method of channel routing. The well-known suspended sediment processes have been modifi ed and integrated with the developed hydraulic model. The developed model was applied and simulated for the Saltwater Creek, Gold Coast, Australia. Sensitivity analysis of the model showed that all the particles' characteristics within the incoming stream fl ows are important for the better prediction of suspended sediment loads.


Hossain I.,Swinburne University of Technology | Imteaz M.A.,Swinburne University of Technology | Hossain M.I.,Gold Coast City Council
International Journal of Global Environmental Issues | Year: 2012

This paper presents the calibration of a catchment water quality model developed for the continuous simulation of stormwater pollutants from a catchment to the catchment outlet. Calibration of the model was performed using the rainfall and water quality data collected for 'Saltwater Creek Catchment' in Gold Coast, Australia. Runoff estimations from the hydrologic model were compared with calculated discharges through widely used Australian runoff models, WBNM and DRAINS. Sensitivity analysis of the model parameters showed that maximum build-up rate, build-up rate coefficient and wash-off coefficients are sensitive parameters of the model. Based on measured water quality data, different parameters of the model were calibrated for the above-mentioned catchment. Calibration of the model was demonstrated for the water quality pollutants suspended solids (SS), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP). Copyright © 2012 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.


Jackson A.,International Coastal Management | Hill P.,Gold Coast City Council
Coasts and Ports 2013 | Year: 2013

Nourishment will become increasingly important to manage beaches worldwide as recreational beaches become an increasingly more valuable and threatened resource. Nourishment is an essential element of the management of the Gold Coast beaches and unit rates /m3 are competitive with international rates due to the growth of a local dredging industry that has developed innovative dredging techniques and expertise. Beach nourishment, from small to large scale using different sources and methods carried out on the Gold Coast, spans almost 40 years from the early 1970's and has involved many previously untried methodologies, such as nearshore profile nourishment, that have been proven and have evolved from theoretical to routine. Nearshore nourishment has been particularly important as it allows the huge reserves of sand offshore from the beaches to be utilised at a much lower cost than estuarine or other reserves. . The Gold Coast uses a number of sand sources for beach nourishment including terrestrial /building sites, river /estuarine, sand bypassing, sand bypassing and offshore. Sand nourishment is often combined with structures, such as the Narrowneck Reef to maximise efficiency. To date about 49Mm3 of sand nourishment has been implemented and this paper documents this history and lessons learned for application on the Gold Coast and other areas in the future.

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