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Kissling W.D.,University of Amsterdam | Hardisty A.,University of Cardiff | Garcia E.A.,University of Alcalá | Santamaria M.,CNR Institute of Neuroscience | And 8 more authors.
Biodiversity | Year: 2015

Essential biodiversity variables (EBVs) have been proposed by the Group on Earth Observations Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON) to identify a minimum set of essential measurements that are required for studying, monitoring and reporting biodiversity and ecosystem change. Despite the initial conceptualisation, however, the practical implementation of EBVs remains challenging. There is much discussion about the concept and implementation of EBVs: which variables are meaningful; which data are needed and available; at which spatial, temporal and topical scales can EBVs be calculated; and how sensitive are EBVs to variations in underlying data? To advance scientific progress in implementing EBVs we propose that both scientists and research infrastructure operators need to cooperate globally to serve and process the essential large datasets for calculating EBVs. We introduce GLOBIS-B (GLOBal Infrastructures for Supporting Biodiversity research), a global cooperation funded by the Horizon 2020 research and innovation framework programme of the European Commission. The main aim of GLOBIS-B is to bring together biodiversity scientists, global research infrastructure operators and legal interoperability experts to identify the research needs and infrastructure services underpinning the concept of EBVs. The project will facilitate the multi-lateral cooperation of biodiversity research infrastructures worldwide and identify the required primary data, analysis tools, methodologies and legal and technical bottlenecks to develop an agenda for research and infrastructure development to compute EBVs. This requires development of standards, protocols and workflows that are ‘self-documenting’ and openly shared to allow the discovery and analysis of data across large spatial extents and different temporal resolutions. The interoperability of existing biodiversity research infrastructures will be crucial for integrating the necessary biodiversity data to calculate EBVs, and to advance our ability to assess progress towards the Aichi targets for 2020 of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). © 2015 The Author(s). Published by Taylor & Francis.


Redolfi A.,Laboratory of Epidemiology and Neuroimaging | Manset D.,Gnubila France | Barkhof F.,VU University Amsterdam | Wahlund L.-O.,Karolinska Institutet | And 5 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Background and Purpose: The measurement of cortical shrinkage is a candidate marker of disease progression in Alzheimer's. This study evaluated the performance of two pipelines: Civet-CLASP (v1.1.9) and Freesurfer (v5.3.0). Methods: Images from 185 ADNI1 cases (69 elderly controls (CTR), 37 stable MCI (sMCI), 27 progressive MCI (pMCI), and 52 Alzheimer (AD) patients) scanned at baseline, month 12, and month 24 were processed using the two pipelines and two interconnected e-infrastructures: neuGRID (https://neugrid4you.eu) and VIP (http://vip.creatis.insa-lyon.fr). The vertex-by-vertex cross-algorithm comparison was made possible applying the 3D gradient vector flow (GVF) and closest point search (CPS) techniques. Results: The cortical thickness measured with Freesurfer was systematically lower by one third if compared to Civet 's. Cross-sectionally, Freesurfer's effect size was significantly different in the posterior division of the temporal fusiform cortex. Both pipelines were weakly or mildly correlated with the Mini Mental State Examination score (MMSE) and the hippocampal volumetry. Civet differed significantly from Freesurfer in large frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital regions (p<0.05). In a discriminant analysis with cortical ROIs having effect size larger than 0.8, both pipelines gave no significant differences in area under the curve (AUC). Longitudinally, effect sizes were not significantly different in any of the 28 ROIs tested. Both pipelines weakly correlated with MMSE decay, showing no significant differences. Freesurfer mildly correlated with hippocampal thinning rate and differed in the supramarginal gyrus, temporal gyrus, and in the lateral occipital cortex compared to Civet (p<0.05). In a discriminant analysis with ROIs having effect size larger than 0.6, both pipelines yielded no significant differences in the AUC. Conclusions: Civet appears slightly more sensitive to the typical AD atrophic pattern at the MCI stage, but both pipelines can accurately characterize the topography of cortical thinning at the dementia stage. © 2015 Redolfi et al.


PubMed | Karolinska Institutet, Montreal Neurological Institute, VU University Amsterdam, Gnubila France and 3 more.
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

The measurement of cortical shrinkage is a candidate marker of disease progression in Alzheimers. This study evaluated the performance of two pipelines: Civet-CLASP (v1.1.9) and Freesurfer (v5.3.0).Images from 185 ADNI1 cases (69 elderly controls (CTR), 37 stable MCI (sMCI), 27 progressive MCI (pMCI), and 52 Alzheimer (AD) patients) scanned at baseline, month 12, and month 24 were processed using the two pipelines and two interconnected e-infrastructures: neuGRID (https://neugrid4you.eu) and VIP (http://vip.creatis.insa-lyon.fr). The vertex-by-vertex cross-algorithm comparison was made possible applying the 3D gradient vector flow (GVF) and closest point search (CPS) techniques.The cortical thickness measured with Freesurfer was systematically lower by one third if compared to Civets. Cross-sectionally, Freesurfers effect size was significantly different in the posterior division of the temporal fusiform cortex. Both pipelines were weakly or mildly correlated with the Mini Mental State Examination score (MMSE) and the hippocampal volumetry. Civet differed significantly from Freesurfer in large frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital regions (p<0.05). In a discriminant analysis with cortical ROIs having effect size larger than 0.8, both pipelines gave no significant differences in area under the curve (AUC). Longitudinally, effect sizes were not significantly different in any of the 28 ROIs tested. Both pipelines weakly correlated with MMSE decay, showing no significant differences. Freesurfer mildly correlated with hippocampal thinning rate and differed in the supramarginal gyrus, temporal gyrus, and in the lateral occipital cortex compared to Civet (p<0.05). In a discriminant analysis with ROIs having effect size larger than 0.6, both pipelines yielded no significant differences in the AUC.Civet appears slightly more sensitive to the typical AD atrophic pattern at the MCI stage, but both pipelines can accurately characterize the topography of cortical thinning at the dementia stage.


Redolfi A.,Laboratory of Epidemiology and Neuroimaging | Bosco P.,Laboratory of Epidemiology and Neuroimaging | Manset D.,Gnubila France | Frisoni G.B.,Laboratory of Epidemiology and Neuroimaging
Functional Neurology | Year: 2013

The brain of a patient with Alzheimer's disease (AD) undergoes changes starting many years before the development of the first clinical symptoms. The recent availability of large prospective datasets makes it possible to create sophisticated brain models of healthy subjects and patients with AD, showing pathophysiological changes occurring over time. However, these models are still inadequate; representations are mainly single-scale and they do not account for the complexity and interdependence of brain changes. Brain changes in AD patients occur at different levels and for different reasons: at the molecular level, changes are due to amyloid deposition; at cellular level, to loss of neuron synapses, and at tissue level, to connectivity disruption. All cause extensive atrophy of the whole brain organ. Initiatives aiming to model the whole human brain have been launched in Europe and the US with the goal of reducing the burden of brain diseases. In this work, we describe a new approach to earlier diagnosis based on a multimodal and multiscale brain concept, built upon existing and well-characterized single modalities. © CIC Edizioni Internazionali.

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