Wrexham, United Kingdom
Wrexham, United Kingdom

Glyndŵr University is a British university with campuses at Wrexham, Northop and St Asaph in north-east Wales; and at Elephant and Castle, London. It offers both undergraduate and postgraduate degrees, as well as professional courses. GU has approximately 9,000 students.Formerly known as the North East Wales Institute of Higher Education , it was granted full university status in 2008 after being a member of the University of Wales since 2003. The university is named after the medieval Welsh prince Owain Glyndŵr, who first suggested the establishment of universities throughout Wales in the early 15th century.In June 2014 the university was suspended from recruiting students from outside the UK. This followed an investigation into students who had obtained fraudulent English language qualifications in order to gain admission to the university. An investigation is currently under way and a task force has been established with the aim of getting the suspension lifted. Wikipedia.

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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SPA.2012.2.2-01 | Award Amount: 2.59M | Year: 2013

For knowledge to progress in many aspects of astrophysics it is clear that we need to make observations at all wavelengths that at least match the spatial resolution achieved in the optical by the Hubble Space Telescope. This is especially true in the Far Infra-Red waveband (FIR - 30-300 micron - where our atmosphere is opaque) where the necessity of space borne experiments combined with long wavelengths makes achieving high spatial resolution particularly difficult. At present FIR observations lie in a resolution gap of 2 orders of magnitude represented by the James-Webb Space telescope in the mid-infrared on one side and the ALMA interferometer, in the sub-mm, on the other. Only with the development of space borne interferometers can we hope to bridge this divide. This project brings together the leading international experts on FIR space instrumentation and experienced astronomers in a unique collaborative effort to address the development needs of a high resolution FIR observatory through two major activities. Firstly to identify the scientific questions which require high spatial resolution observations in the FIR. We will translate these into the definition of an ambitious space mission and its associated key technologies. At the same time we will study a number of technologies relevant to space interferometers which are at a low Technology Readiness Level. These include free-space beam combination with cryogenic delay lines, deployable low-mass telescopes, accurate satellite position measurement techniques and advanced ground calibration scenarios. We will develop these technologies through a consortium of universities, research establishments and industry which combine the best academic and industrial expertise. The outcome of this work will advance the knowledge and technology required for a future FIR mission, consolidate the scientific community and bring world-wide expertise to the EU consortium. We will promote the results to a wider scientific community through a number of international workshops centred on the definition of a future FIR space mission.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: STFC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 72.08K | Year: 2014

Precision lenses and mirrors are used for a host of applications - ground-based telescopes for astronomy, satellites looking up at space or down at the ground, machines to make semiconductor chips (for computers to mobile phones...), defence systems, laser-systems and numerous other applications. The manufacture of precision optics is basically a two-stage process. First a glass blank is ground with a hard grinding wheel that cuts the material, to hog out the glass to the basic curved form. The glass is then polished using some form of pad that rubs the surface, using a water-slurry of a polishing compound - red rouge in the old days, white cerium oxide powder today. Over the last decade, the optics industry has experienced a revolution in computer numerical control (CNC) of both the grinding and polishing processes. The project involves two partner companies pre-eminent in both types of machine and processes. Zeeko Ltd (originally spun out of UCL research in this field) manufactures CNC polishing machines and measurement equipment. Cranfield Precision Ltd (a division of Cinetic Landis) produces CNC grinding machines. Such CNC machines almost always move the grinding or polishing tool across the surface in a standard back-and-forth raster pattern, or in a spiral path (by rotating the work-piece). A raster or spiral is a special case, because it crosses itself nowhere, and this simplifies calculating how the removal adds up. But, just like a tractor ploughing a field, these paths leave regular furrows in the surface. Whilst these might be only nanometres deep (just tens of atoms) they cause stray light around an image in a telescope or camera. There are various ways of smoothing surfaces to remove these regular features, but this takes additional times. Moreover, each extra process leaves its own signature, which itself has to be removed ... in what sometimes seems like an endless circle! The new research will break out of this mould by using advanced mathematical methods to generate more complex tool-paths, which cross each other at myriads of points, and give a natural averaging effect. We call these hyper-crossing paths. Furthermore, the polishing machines are able to change the polishing spot size on the fly. In principle (and with the right mathematics) spot-size could be actively tuned to attack different sizes of surface-feature as the tool moves across a surface. We plan to develop this new idea, and are confident it will lead to a break-through in superior surfaces in less time. And what of the results? These will be incorporated in the standard software of the partner companies, enhancing their competitive position. The results will also be used on the machines at the National Facility for Ultra-precision Surfaces in North Wales, operated by Glyndwr University in partnership with University College London. This will give enhanced capability for manufacturing optics to support British Science and our overseas collaborators. Beyond this we plan to disseminate the findings to the wider UK academic and and manufacturing communities to collaborate on and develop applications and prototypes for applications in high precision surfaces outside of the optics sector e.g. medical - prosthetic joints.


Tu W.,Glyndwr University
IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications | Year: 2012

Wireless multimedia services are major applications of next generation wireless networks. This paper is one of the first to study the efficient utilization of network resources for increasing the number of concurrent multimedia flows when a channel becomes saturated. We theoretically study the flow scheduling policy and the channel aggregation policy in both single-hop and multi-hop wireless networks with the motivation of ameliorating the trade-off between limited channel resources and multiple flow transmission. To increase the number of performance guaranteed multimedia flows, based on the dynamic states of wireless channels and the profiles of multimedia flows, the two policies fully utilize the performance gap to schedule concurrent flows for transmission in turn and aggregate multiple channels' residual capacities for useful flow transmissions. We then design a novel algorithm - efficient multi-flow multicast transmission (EMMT) - to apply the proposed policies to practical wireless multimedia multicast applications. At last, we use ns2 simulations to evaluate the studied policies and the EMMT algorithm. Our simulation results prove the effectiveness of our schemes in improving network ability to admit more multimedia flows. © 1983-2012 IEEE.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 237.42K | Year: 2012

Metal thin films are used in a wide variety of technologies, such as solar cells and printed circuit boards for electronics. Inkjet printing has emerged as a practical and low-cost route for manufacturing electrical contacts in these applications. However existing manufacturing technologies use inks that often require a final heat treatment to consolidate or sinter the film. If this last step can be eliminated, by depositing fully dense films, then the inkjet manufacturing process could be applied to temperature sensitive substrates like plastics or vulnerable semiconductor materials. The purpose of this project is to develop sinter-free inkjet manufacturing processes, by taking ink precursors developed for other thin film processes, and exploiting them to use the significant benefits of inkjet process technology e.g. the direct writing of interconnects or wires. If successful, the project will represent a step-change in the manufacturing methods for this type of film.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 63.53K | Year: 2013

To undertake an extensive business process re-engineering project, result in streamlining operations and reducing time and resources.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 63.53K | Year: 2013

To develop and commercialise a series of bespoke modular training programmes focusing on culture development within high risk sectors.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 36.30K | Year: 2014

To increase recycling returns, reduce costs, influence NPD and become established as a Consumer Behavior Research hub for Europe through consumer psychology and culture change.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 40.22K | Year: 2015

To establish an IT infrastructure to facilitate the growth of a modularized ERP system, starting with a stock management system to enable growth in internet trading.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 54.45K | Year: 2016

To develop an innovative way for patients to access physiotherapy rehabilitation in the home and improve their interaction with physios, consultants and healthcare workers


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: EPSRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 331.89K | Year: 2013

The UK has a world class reputation for design and manufacture of space based technologies. A new National Space Academy has been launched this year to help boost the size and quality of the UKs science and engineering expertise. The proposal supports strongly The UK Space Directory, an organisation of eight groups representing and supporting the UK space community and including the Technology Strategy Board that state the UK Space Industry has come together to propose an ambitious 20 year strategy to capture 10% of the global space market, £40 billion, by 2030 and in doing so create 100,000 UK jobs. The UK houses some of the leading companies in space applications such as; Inmarsat, Rolls Royce, Logica, Vega Space, Astrium, Qioptiq Space Technology and Surrey Satellite Technology Limited. The latter two companies strongly back the research detailed within this proposal and have both provided satements of support. This proposal seeks to offer an alternative PV technology for large area arrays and to be the first to report thin film cadmium telluride (CdTe) deposited directly onto toughened cerium-doped microsheet glass (CMG), explicitly targeting a significant increase in specific power by a step-change reduction of system weight. The Qioptiq Space Technology CMG microsheet glass is optimised to match the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of gallium arsenide (GaAs) based space solar cells. With the CdTe CTE almost identical to that of GaAs the choice of CMG is ideal for the prevention of delamination under the severe thermal gradients to which space PV is exposed. This adventurous approach, using the CMG as both the radiation barrier and substrate, will be proven by characterisation of 5 x 5 cm2 deposited devices and finally scaled to 10 x 20 cm2 on the Centre for Solar Energy Research (CSER) pilot metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) system. This proposal has the content and vision to make a significant contribution to the UKs flourishin space industry. Key to the success of the project will be the dissemination and pathways to impact of the research outcomes; this will be ensured through regular reporting to and feedback from a steering group of potential exploiters-Industrial experts and through targeted press releases. This proposal offers UK research the chance to impact the space PV market either through licencing of the arising IP and more excitingly in the current economic climate through manufacture of the final product.

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