Glostrup University Hospital Glostrup

Glostrup, Denmark

Glostrup University Hospital Glostrup

Glostrup, Denmark
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Usinger L.,Glostrup University Hospital Glostrup | Ibsen H.,Holbaek Hospital | Linneberg A.,Glostrup University Hospital | Azizi M.,University of Paris Descartes | And 2 more authors.
Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging | Year: 2010

Objective: Milk fermented by lactic acid bacteria is suggested to have antihypertensive effect in humans. In vitro and animal studies have established an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor effect of peptides in fermented milk. However, other modes of action must be considered, because until today no human studies have confirmed an ACE inhibition in relation to the intake of fermented milk. Materials and methods: We undertook a double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled study including 94 borderline-hypertensive persons to study the effect on human physiology of Lactobacillus helveticus fermented milk. The subjects were randomized into three groups: Cardi04-300 ml, Cardi04-150 ml or placebo. All components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system were measured several times. Sympathetic activity was estimated by plasma noradrenaline and cardiovascular response to head-up tilt at baseline and after 8 weeks of intervention. Results: No ACE inhibition of the fermented milk was demonstrated, as none of the components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosteron system changed. Plasma noradrenaline response to tilt test after intervention stayed unchanged between groups (P = 0·38), but declined in the group Cardi04-300 from 2·01 ± 0·93 nmol l-1 at baseline to 1·49 ± 0·74 nmol l-1 after 8 weeks (P = 0·002). There was no change in 24-h ambulatory blood pressure or heart rate between groups. Conclusions: Despite a known ACE inhibitory effect in vitro and in animals. , milk fermented with Lb. helveticus did not inhibit ACE in humans. Our results suggest that the intake of fermented milk decreases sympathetic activity, although not to an extent mediating reductions of blood pressure and heart rate in borderline-hypertensive subjects. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine.


PubMed | Glostrup University Hospital Glostrup, Research Center for Prevention and Health Glostrup and Copenhagen University
Type: | Journal: Frontiers in genetics | Year: 2015

Common diseases like essential hypertension or diabetes mellitus are complex as they are polygenic in nature, such that each genetic variation only has a small influence on the disease. Genes operates in integrated networks providing the blue-print for all biological processes and conditional of the complex genotype determines the state and dynamics of any trait, which may be modified to various extent by non-genetic factors. Thus, diseases are heterogenous ensembles of conditions with a common endpoint. Numerous studies have been performed to define genes of importance for a trait or disease, but only a few genes with small effect have been identified. The major reasons for this modest progress is the unresolved heterogeneity of the regulation of blood pressure and the shortcomings of the prevailing monogenic approach to capture genetic effects in a polygenic condition. Here, a two-step procedure is presented in which physiological heterogeneity is disentangled and genetic effects are analyzed by variance decomposition of genetic interactions and by an information theoretical approach including 162 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in 84 genes in the sphingolipid metabolism and related networks in blood pressure regulation. As expected, almost no genetic main effects were detected. In contrast, two-gene interactions established the entire sphingolipid metabolic and related genetic network to be highly involved in the regulation of blood pressure. The pattern of interaction clearly revealed that epistasis does not necessarily reflects the topology of the metabolic pathways i.e., the flow of metabolites. Rather, the enzymes and proteins are integrated in complex cellular substructures where communication flows between the components of the networks, which may be composite in structure. The heritabilities for diastolic and systolic blood pressure were estimated to be 0.63 and 0.01, which may in fact be the maximum heritabilities of these traits. This procedure provide a platform for studying and capturing the genetic networks of any polygenic trait, condition, or disease.


PubMed | Glostrup University Hospital Glostrup
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Clinical physiology and functional imaging | Year: 2010

Milk fermented by lactic acid bacteria is suggested to have antihypertensive effect in humans. In vitro and animal studies have established an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor effect of peptides in fermented milk. However, other modes of action must be considered, because until today no human studies have confirmed an ACE inhibition in relation to the intake of fermented milk.We undertook a double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled study including 94 borderline-hypertensive persons to study the effect on human physiology of Lactobacillus helveticus fermented milk. The subjects were randomized into three groups: Cardi04-300 ml, Cardi04-150 ml or placebo. All components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system were measured several times. Sympathetic activity was estimated by plasma noradrenaline and cardiovascular response to head-up tilt at baseline and after 8 weeks of intervention.No ACE inhibition of the fermented milk was demonstrated, as none of the components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosteron system changed. Plasma noradrenaline response to tilt test after intervention stayed unchanged between groups (P = 0.38), but declined in the group Cardi04-300 from 2.01 +/- 0.93 nmol l(-1) at baseline to 1.49 +/- 0.74 nmol l(-1) after 8 weeks (P = 0.002). There was no change in 24-h ambulatory blood pressure or heart rate between groups.Despite a known ACE inhibitory effect in vitro and in animals, milk fermented with Lb. helveticus did not inhibit ACE in humans. Our results suggest that the intake of fermented milk decreases sympathetic activity, although not to an extent mediating reductions of blood pressure and heart rate in borderline-hypertensive subjects.

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