Global Center

Tokyo, Japan

Global Center

Tokyo, Japan
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

Selected from 180 Applicants at Inaugural Event in Cleveland -- MedRespond was selected First Place winner in the Open Division at the inaugural Medical Capital Innovation Competition  "All Things Data in Healthcare" The competition, sponsored by  Cuyahoga County, BioEnterprise, HIMSS (Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society), and The Global Center for Health Innovation (GCHI) selected awardees from commerce and academia. The competition, held at the HIMMS Innovation Center at the Global Center for Health Innovation featured 27 invited juried participants, drawn from a pool of over 180 applicants.  Participants were chosen for the how they apply big data to meet critical healthcare challenges. MedRespond featured the Cardiac Rehabilitation Coach.Virginia F. Pribanic, MedRespond CEO, said, "I am especially honored for MedRespond to be chosen for this award.  The selection committee chose a truly impressive slate of entrepreneurs to participate in the program.  The BioEnterprise team, HIMSS , the Global Center and the sponsors put together a very  meaningful two days in Cleveland."MedRespond, LLC is a Pittsburgh‐based patient engagement technology (PET) company. Using proprietary natural language processing technology, MedRespond simulates one‐on‐one conversations with providers, patients and their families. In conversational patient engagement applications, participants are greeted by a video health guide to walk them through everything they need to know about the current stage of their healthcare journey. Along the way, patients can ask questions in their own words.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

In the health care setting, there is an increasing need for a self-donning surgical gown that health care personnel can don without the need for any assistance. Also, in the context of Crisis Management for the Ebola virus and other severe infectious diseases, use of a gown that can be donned and removed quickly and safely as infection protection to prevent onwards transmission to environmental infection is more important than ever. The research group led by Kiyokazu Nakajima, professor at the Global Center for Medical Engineering and Informatics, Osaka University, has succeeded in developing a safe and easy self-donning and self-adjusting surgical gown called "Selfgown," which could also minimize environmental infection [1] from splashes when taking off gloves [2]. The group has been working on R&D of medical devices and non-medical equipment [3] to reduce labor burden of medical support staff and to ensure the best use of human resources in order to improve the work environment in health care settings. In this study, the group responded to the strong need to develop a self-donning, self-adjusting surgical gown and succeeded in commercialization after 2 years of R&D. Conventional surgical gowns are designed to have an assistant tie strings or a belt around the neck, inner gown, and waist to keep arms and hands inside the sterile field. The new gown is composed of a special spring along the neckline instead of strings. The inner belt is removed by applying a three-dimensional structure on the rear torso portions to overlap each other. Applying sticky tape on a transfer card for temporary adhesion and forming a special perforation at the end of the waist belt led to the realization of this groundbreaking self-donning, self-adjusting surgical gown. The notable feature of this gown is that there is practically "zero splashing" of infectious substances from the gloves as the wearer can take off the gown while wrapping the gloves inside-out at the same time, as opposed to a conventional gown where the wearer needs to take off the gloves first in order to undo the strings and the belt. "We exercised our ingenuity to develop a special ring around the neck and to optimize the structure of rear torso portions to overlap each other," said Nakajima. "We finally established a self-donning, self-adjusting system after 18 months of research, making 41 prototypes while conducting 17 animal experiments, 5 clinical trials and incorporating evaluations from over 100 surgeons in Japan and overseas. We were able to develop this groundbreaking gown through advice from infection control and critical care specialists. We wish to widely promote our achievement." This gown will prevent medical accidents, which are becoming a serious problem, and provide safe and secure medical care. It will also enable medical professionals to initiate immediately at large-scale disasters, emergency areas, and disease outbreaks [4]. Eventually, it may be adapted into nursing care or even use outside of medical care, such as waste disposal or radioactive decontamination work. This gown is now available 1: environmental infection: environment (floor, wall or door) contaminated with a virus or bacteria from exposure to splash or contact of body fluids such as blood, vomit or stool. 3: non-medical equipment: any surrounding instrument or material to be used for diagnostic, therapeutic or prevention purposes for human beings or animals which are not regulated in the Pharmaceutical and Medical Device Act, as they are not intended to affect any function of the body of humans or any animals. 4: outbreak: a sudden occurrence of cases of disease in a defined area Remarks: This research was jointly conducted by Daiei Co., Ltd., Tokusen Industry Co., Ltd. and Osaka University.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Saudi Arabia’s King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, third left, invites President Trump to dance with a sword during a welcome ceremony at Al Murabba Palace in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. (Photo: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters) President Trump embarked Friday on his first trip abroad since taking the oath of office, a lengthy week-plus trip that began in Saudi Arabia. Trump’s weekend in the kingdom included an anticipated speech on Islam, an arms deal and a strange glowing orb. Here are the highlights from Trump’s weekend in Saudi Arabia. Perhaps the most anticipated moment of the visit was a speech delivered on Islam Sunday afternoon in Riyadh, the capital of Saudi Arabia and epicenter for some of the most holy Muslim sites. During the campaign, Trump had called for a ban of all Muslims entering the United States. And he once told CNN, “I think Islam hates us. There’s something there that — there’s a tremendous hatred there. There’s a tremendous hatred. We have to get to the bottom of it. There’s an unbelievable hatred of us.” But the Sunday speech took a different tone, with Trump saying, “This is not a battle between different faiths, different sects or different civilizations. This is a battle between barbaric criminals who seek to obliterate human life and decent people of all religions who seek to protect it.” The president also did not use the phrase “radical Islamic terror,” a series of words he continually criticized former President Barack Obama for not saying in describing the war against ISIS. In a departure from his predecessor’s policy, Trump called for other Arab countries to isolate Iran. Trump deviated from his prepared remarks, adding in a jab at “Islamic terror of all kinds.” And he said “Islamic extremism” instead of “Islamist extremism,” the latter treating the terrorism as a political and not religious movement. A White House official told reporters that fatigue was responsible for the switch and Trump was “just an exhausted guy.” The most celebrated meme of Trump’s trip was his participation in a ceremony opening Saudi Arabia’s new Global Center for Combating Extremist Ideology. Trump, Egyptian President Abdul Fattah al-Sisi and Saudi King Salman all gathered around a glowing white orb to “activate” the center, making for an interesting photo opportunity: On his first day abroad, Trump and Salman officially signed an arms deal for the United States to immediately sell $110 billion in military equipment to Saudi Arabia. The deal could potentially be worth more than $300 billion over the next 10 years and was negotiated by Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner. On the second day of the trip, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates pledged to donate $100 million to Ivanka Trump’s proposed Women’s Entrepreneurs Fund, which would be run by the World Bank. The move could be seen as hypocritical by the first daughter, as women in Saudi Arabia have severely limited rights — it is illegal for them to drive, for example — and President Trump criticized Hillary Clinton for taking money from the Saudis as a candidate. “Saudi Arabia and many of the countries that gave vast amounts of money to the Clinton Foundation want women as slaves and to kill gays,” Trump wrote on Facebook. “Hillary must return all money from such countries!” Trump and members of his Cabinet took part in a traditional “Aradh” sword dance. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross carried blades on their shoulders, while Trump joined in as well:


Clark discussed medical technology innovation from the entrepreneur's perspective, including how the company identified the value of its approach to improving vascular access and nursing care. He also described how Linear Health conceived its development process and the path the company took to obtain its seed funding. "We've benefited from our ability to make the right fit at the right time with our medtech accelerator partnerships," Clark said. "Different accelerator programs offer different capabilities, and it's been very helpful to match those capabilities with the stages of our development." Linear Health Sciences is developing safety release valve technology for a variety of medical tubing. The company's first product, the Orchid Safety Release Valve, is designed to safely prevent the unwanted dislodgement of IV catheters. The Medtech Innovator 2016 competition chose the company as a semifinalist and also awarded it a scholarship into Medtech Innovator's Virtual Accelerator program. "Our work with MedTech Innovator gave us early visibility for the product concept," Clark said. "Our more recent partnership with GCMI has been more technically focused, which nicely fits the stage of our product development as we move closer to market launch." GCMI is a comprehensive medical-device innovation center that guides the development and commercialization of new medical devices. Linear Health Sciences was the first company to receive a grant to work with GCMI in its Medtech Accelerator program. "Their participation in the SEMDA panel demonstrates how the medical device industry and investment communities feel about the company's impressive start," said Tiffany Wilson, CEO of the Global Center for Medical Innovation (GCMI). "The company has made a strong impression because it has an elegant technology that's designed to meet an important need in vascular access. It also has a clear, innovative vision about how to bring the device to market, and that in turn has helped attract notable, early investments." Clark said another key to the company's rapid development has been the ability to transfer engineering knowledge and technology from other fields into the medical space: "We've been able to identify where there was similar technology in other industries that could be successfully adapted to benefit patients and clinicians." The company was a popular exhibitor at the Infusion Nurses Society annual conference this month. It will also exhibit at the upcoming annual meeting of the Association for Vascular Access, September 16-19 in Phoenix. The Orchid Safety Release Valve breaks away under tension and seals off flow in the IV line, creating a sterile barrier. The IV pump then recognizes the line as occluded, triggering an alarm to notify staff of the disconnection. The concept is analogous to breakaway devices that help prevent hazardous fuel spills when a customer at a gas station mistakenly drives away with the gas nozzle still in the fuel tank. For nurses: * Greater efficiency through avoiding dislodgements and unscheduled IV restarts * Less exposure to sharps injuries and potentially infected blood For hospitals: * Reduced potential for infiltrations, phlebitis and healthcare-acquired infections * Cost savings due to less need to replace entire IV setups because of accidental dislodgements * Greater patient satisfaction For patients: * Fewer IV restarts including painful needlesticks * Reduced potential for more invasive treatment such as central lines due to loss of peripheral IV integrity Founded by a physician and two engineers, Linear Health Sciences is the developer of the Orchid Safety Release Valve and other safety technology solutions for medical tubing. Those solutions are designed to improve the healthcare experience for patients, caregivers and healthcare institutions. The estimated market for the company's technology is $1 billion annually. Linear Health is currently pursuing FDA clearance for the Orchid Safety Release Valve. For more information, access www.linearsciences.com. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/linear-health-sciences-early-success-highlighted-at-semda-medical-device-conference-300458957.html


Receive press releases from The Global Center: By Email borderless, a New Media Initiative on Pressing Global Issues to Launch at New School's Zolberg Institute in New York with Film on Syrian Refugee Crisis, Thursday May 4 New York, NY, May 03, 2017 --( The event will take place on Thursday, May 4th, 2017 from 6pm - 7:30pm at The New School’s Wollman Hall (65 W. 11th St., Rm. B500, NYC). It will feature the premiere of the borderless migration crisis episode and a panel discussion with Ninette Kelley, Director of United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Office in New York and Alex Aleinikoff, Director of the Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility at The New School along with an introduction and musical performance by borderless’ host Stephan Said, with reception to follow. The event is free and open to the public. The borderless docu-series follows Said as he travels the globe searching for positive responses to the world’s biggest crises, making music to bring people together as he travels. Along the way, he discovers stories of courage and creativity in the face of inequality, conflict, poverty, extremism, global warming and more, using media to connect movements, people, and knowledge. The first 30-minute episode of borderless takes the audience to heart of the global refugee crisis, focusing on refugees fleeing Syria, Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Libya, Yemen and more. Said goes from official to unofficial camps and squats across Greece where he hears stories of people fleeing Assad, ISIS, repressive regimes and war, and meets with relief workers from the UNHCR to MSF, the European Commission to anarchist youth running radio stations from camps. He performs with Kurdish minstrels, Syrian rap artists, refugee children, and makes a music video live in camps for his song “No More Lines,” which was released live from camps on World Refugee Day. Later this year, borderless will follow Said to eight locations across the world, such as Johannesburg to Salvador do Bahia. In each episode, borderless will explore a different theme and collaborate with communities. The next program will be filmed in West Virginia, bringing together voices of rural and urban poverty in the USA, exploring unemployment and the opioid drug epidemic. Said’s own family are refugees from Mosul, Iraq who fled ISIS and coalition bombings that destroyed their neighborhood. Prior to filming in refugee camps, borderless followed Said to Iraq just before ISIS invaded, where he collaborated with the National Symphony and Youth Orchestras, graffiti artists, relief workers, film-makers, and created a music video for global unity. The series then followed Said to Pakistan where he worked with numerous NGO’s, schools, and arts institutions and produced a concert for unity attended by thousands. borderless is produced by difrent: Inc, a global media company and institute producing content and programs that bridge culture, socio-economic development and media to catalyze creative solutions for a more equal and open global society. borderless is sponsored by The Global Center, a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit educational foundation, under the direction of award-winning executive producer Rory O’Connor, that helps to create and distribute media to promote and foster public awareness of the peoples, culture and current affairs of nations throughout the world. The Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility provides a space for research and scholarship, policy debate, and discussion with activists and artists around issues of global migration and mobility, their economic impact, political consequences and their meaning for issues of citizenship and identity. New York, NY, May 03, 2017 --( PR.com )-- The New School’s Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility in collaboration with USA for UNHCR and difrent: will host the launch of borderless, a new media initiative designed to connect people at the frontlines of the world’s pressing crises. borderless includes a docu-series, collaborative workshops and educational programs, production of original cultural content, online platform and website, as well as social networks and distribution through traditional and digital media partners.The event will take place on Thursday, May 4th, 2017 from 6pm - 7:30pm at The New School’s Wollman Hall (65 W. 11th St., Rm. B500, NYC). It will feature the premiere of the borderless migration crisis episode and a panel discussion with Ninette Kelley, Director of United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Office in New York and Alex Aleinikoff, Director of the Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility at The New School along with an introduction and musical performance by borderless’ host Stephan Said, with reception to follow. The event is free and open to the public.The borderless docu-series follows Said as he travels the globe searching for positive responses to the world’s biggest crises, making music to bring people together as he travels. Along the way, he discovers stories of courage and creativity in the face of inequality, conflict, poverty, extremism, global warming and more, using media to connect movements, people, and knowledge. The first 30-minute episode of borderless takes the audience to heart of the global refugee crisis, focusing on refugees fleeing Syria, Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Libya, Yemen and more. Said goes from official to unofficial camps and squats across Greece where he hears stories of people fleeing Assad, ISIS, repressive regimes and war, and meets with relief workers from the UNHCR to MSF, the European Commission to anarchist youth running radio stations from camps. He performs with Kurdish minstrels, Syrian rap artists, refugee children, and makes a music video live in camps for his song “No More Lines,” which was released live from camps on World Refugee Day.Later this year, borderless will follow Said to eight locations across the world, such as Johannesburg to Salvador do Bahia. In each episode, borderless will explore a different theme and collaborate with communities. The next program will be filmed in West Virginia, bringing together voices of rural and urban poverty in the USA, exploring unemployment and the opioid drug epidemic.Said’s own family are refugees from Mosul, Iraq who fled ISIS and coalition bombings that destroyed their neighborhood. Prior to filming in refugee camps, borderless followed Said to Iraq just before ISIS invaded, where he collaborated with the National Symphony and Youth Orchestras, graffiti artists, relief workers, film-makers, and created a music video for global unity. The series then followed Said to Pakistan where he worked with numerous NGO’s, schools, and arts institutions and produced a concert for unity attended by thousands.borderless is produced by difrent: Inc, a global media company and institute producing content and programs that bridge culture, socio-economic development and media to catalyze creative solutions for a more equal and open global society.borderless is sponsored by The Global Center, a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit educational foundation, under the direction of award-winning executive producer Rory O’Connor, that helps to create and distribute media to promote and foster public awareness of the peoples, culture and current affairs of nations throughout the world.The Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility provides a space for research and scholarship, policy debate, and discussion with activists and artists around issues of global migration and mobility, their economic impact, political consequences and their meaning for issues of citizenship and identity. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from The Global Center


News Article | May 21, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia (AP) — The Latest on President Donald Trump's first trip abroad (all times local): President Donald Trump is imploring Middle Eastern countries to extinguish what he calls "Islamic extremism" emanating from the region. Speaking Sunday to Arab leaders in Saudi Arabia, Trump described the conflict as a "battle between good and evil" rather than a clash between the West and Islam. Trump all but promised he would not publicly admonish Mideast rulers for human rights violations and oppressive reigns. That's a pointed departure from the approach taken by his predecessor, former President Barack Obama. Instead, Trump said he's offering a partnership based on shared interests and values in pursuit of "a better future for us all." The president's address is the centerpiece of his two-day visit to Saudi Arabia, his first overseas trip since his January swearing-in. An Israeli official says Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's cabinet approved confidence building measures ahead of President Donald Trump's visit including allowing Palestinian construction in part of the West Bank. He says Sunday's package includes Palestinian building permits for a West Bank area under Israeli control known as Area C. The official was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly before the government's official announcement and spoke on condition of anonymity. The Palestinian Authority has limited say in about 38 percent of the West Bank where most Palestinians live. The remainder of the land, home to over 350,000 Israeli settlers, has largely been off limits to Palestinian development. Israeli media reported the package includes economic concessions and opening the border crossing between the West Bank and Jordan 24 hours a day. President Donald Trump and Saudi Arabia's King Salman are inaugurating a new state-of-the-art center in Riyadh to monitor and combat extremism. Trump and a number of regional leaders visited the new Global Center for Combating Extremist Ideology Sunday, the heart of which is a giant wall, filled with screens displaying real-time online extremist activity. More than two hundreds data analysts also worked on their individual computer screens. Trump and the king each placed their hands on a miniature globe that officially activated the center and launched a splashy welcome video. The White House did not immediately provide information as to any U.S. Involvement in the creation of the center. The project began two years ago, before Trump took office. The new U.S. ambassador to Israel has attended a celebration of Israel's capture of east Jerusalem 50 years ago, days after the White House declined to recognize Israeli sovereignty over the area. David Friedman joined a host of hardline Israeli leaders at Sunday's celebration. Later, he joined Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at a bigger celebration in Jerusalem's Old City. Netanyahu says it was the first time an American ambassador has attended such an event. Israel captured east Jerusalem in the 1967 Mideast war. The area is home to sensitive religious sites, including the Western Wall, the holiest place where Jews can pray. Israel considers the entire city to be its capital. The international community says the fate of east Jerusalem, claimed by the Palestinians, must be resolved through negotiations. A Syrian rebel commander fighting Syrian and allied troops has praised President Donald Trump's criticism of Iran, calling it a boost for opponents of the government of President Bashar Assad. In Riyadh, Trump said Assad's government has committed "unspeakable crimes" bolstered by Iran, blaming Tehran for supporting terrorists and fueling instability in the region. Jamil al-Saleh, the commander of the western-backed Ezzah Army rebel group, called Trump's position "excellent." Al-Saleh said Trump appears to be charting a new path, expressing hope it means that he will not tolerate and will respond to Iran's involvement in Syria, which he said, is an indirect boost to the opposition. Iran is one of the main backers of Assad, advising and sending fighters to Syria against insurgents. Al-Saleh said Trump's speech was a message to Russia, the other backer of Assad's government. "He is telling Russia that all your partners in the Syrian theater are the very definition of terrorism." Palestinian activists are calling for a "Day of Rage" when President Donald Trump visits the West Bank on Tuesday. A group calling itself the Supreme National Leadership Committee is calling for public demonstrations across the West Bank. The committee includes various Palestinian political factions, including President Mahmoud Abbas' Fatah movement. The demonstrations are meant to draw attention to a month long hunger strike by hundreds of prisoners being held by Israel and to protest what many Palestinians say is unfair U.S. support for Israel. In a statement, the group said Sunday the Palestinian factions "affirm their rejection of the American position, which is biased in favor of the occupation." The Hamas militant group has lashed out at President Donald Trump for mentioning it with al-Qaeda and the Islamic State in his speech in Saudi Arabia. Spokesman Fawzi Barhoum says from Gaza City that Trump's remarks Sunday are a "misrepresentation of facts." He dubbed the speech a "confirmation" that Trump is following the policy of previous administrations. Hamas says its battle is against Israel, not the West, and it has tried to rebrand itself by tweaking its charter. But the U.S., along with Israel and others, shun it as a terror group. Hamas targeted civilians in suicide bombings during a Palestinian uprising a decade ago. It has fought three wars with Israel since seizing Gaza from forces of Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in 2007. The U.S. recognizes Abbas as the representative of the Palestinians. President Donald Trump called on Middle Eastern leaders to combat a "crisis of Islamic extremism" emanating from the region, casting the fight against terrorism as a "battle between good and evil," not a clash between the West and Islam. Trump spoke Sunday during a meeting of more than 50 Arab and Muslim leaders in Saudi Arabia. The speech was the centerpiece of Trump's two-day visit to the country as part of his first overseas trip. Trump is putting the onus for combatting terrorism on the region and imploring Muslim leaders to aggressively fight extremists. He'll attend the opening of a Global Center for Combatting Extremist Ideology later Sunday. He spoke of "the crisis of Islamic extremists," ''the Islamists" and "Islamic terror of all kinds." But President Donald Trump did not use the phrase "radical Islamic terrorism" in a major speech Sunday in front of Muslim leaders. As a candidate, Trump routinely railed against former President Barack Obama and his Democratic rival Hillary Clinton for failing to use the specific phrase, insisting that, "Anyone who cannot name our enemy, is not fit to lead this country." Trump struck a more moderate tone in his first foreign policy speech, calling on Middle Eastern leaders to combat a "crisis of Islamic extremism" emanating from the region. But he cast the fight against terrorism as a "battle between good and evil," not a clash between the West and Islam. President Donald Trump says that Syrian President Bashar Assad has committed "unspeakable crimes" bolstered by Iran. In an address to Muslim leaders gathered in Saudi Arabia Sunday, Trump called upon countries around the world to work together to end the humanitarian crisis in Syria. Trump denounced Iranian aggression in the region, and said that the "longest-suffering victims" are the Iranian people. He says the Iranian people have "endured hardship and despair under their leaders' reckless pursuit of conflict and terror." President Donald Trump says that every nation must shoulder the burden of rooting our terrorism from their countries. In an address to the leaders of Muslim-majority countries in Riyadh Sunday, Trump said, "Every nation has an absolute duty to ensure that terrorists find no quarter on their soil." Trump said terrorist groups "do nothing to inspire but kill." He said all countries must work together to "honestly" confront "the crisis of Islamic extremists and the Islamists and Islamic terror of all kinds." Trump fell short of referencing "radical Islamic terrorism" — a term he uses frequently at home and has condemned President Barack Obama for failing to say. President Donald Trump is painting the fight against extremists as "a battle between good and evil." Trump is saying in his first major foreign policy address as president that the fight against terrorism "is not a battle between different faiths, different sects, or different civilizations. This is a battle between those who seek to obliterate human life and those who seek to protect it." He says that, "terrorist don't worship God. They worship death." Trump is speaking in front of an audience of leaders from Arab and Muslim-majority nations. He says the U.S. is prepared to stand with those leaders in the fight against extremists, but that those countries must take the lead. He urged them to drive extremists "out of your places of worship. Drive them out of your community. Drive them out of your holy land." President Donald Trump says that the overwhelming majority of victims of terrorist attacks are the "innocent people of the Arab, Muslim and Middle Eastern nations." Speaking at the Arab-Islamic American Summit in Riyadh Sunday, Trump said that "95 percent of the victims of terrorist attacks are themselves Muslims." He said that terrorism must not only be measured by the number of dead, but the number of "vanished dreams." It's a departure from his sometimes anti-Muslim rhetoric during his presidential campaign. President Donald Trump says the U.S. seeks a "coalition of nations" in the Middle East with the aim of "stamping out extremism." In his address to the Arab-Islamic American Summit in Riyadh, Trump is vowing to "strengthen America's oldest friendships, and to seek new partners in pursuit of peace." Trump promised "that America will not seek to impose our way of life on others, but to outstretch our hands in the spirit cooperation and trust." King Salman of Saudi Arabia says he is committed to stamping out the Islamic State group and other terrorist organizations. Salman is speaking at a gathering of the leaders of more than 50 majority-Muslim countries attending the Arab-Islamic-American Summit in Riyadh. He says that "we all, peoples and countries, reject in every language and in every form damaging the relations of Muslim countries with friendly countries and profiling countries based on a religious or sectarian basis." He's also railing against Iran, calling the country "the spearhead of global terrorism." The leaders of Arab and Muslim-majority countries are gathering to hear President Donald Trump speak in Saudi Arabia. The president is set to deliver a speech Sunday calling for unity across the Muslim world in the fight against terrorism. Excerpts released by the White House show he'll tell Muslim leaders that stamping out terror threats will require "honestly confronting the crisis of Islamist extremism and the Islamist terror groups it inspires." The speech will be Trump's first substantive remarks since he landed in the Middle East Saturday. He's on a five-stop tour that will include stops in Israel and Italy. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has instructed all his Cabinet ministers to attend the official greeting for President Donald Trump, after some of them planned on skipping the event. The move Sunday is the latest in a series of last-minute schedule changes to a presidential visit far different from the meticulously-planned operations of the past. Trump's arrival was initially planned to include speeches and greetings with a long list of dignitaries on the tarmac of Israel's international airport. Later, the White House asked for a brief ceremony to avoid the heat. As a result, most ministers were planning to skip the event. The Haaretz newspaper reports that Netanyahu fumed at his ministers and ordered them all to attend Monday's ceremony. Netanyahu is eager to make a good impression on Trump during the president's first trip abroad. President Donald Trump will tell Muslim leaders that stamping out terror threats will require "honestly confronting the crisis of Islamist extremism and the Islamist terror groups it inspires." That's according to excerpts released by the White House ahead of Trump's speech Sunday calling for unity across the Muslim world in the fight against terrorism. Trump will tell an audience of leaders of Muslim-majority countries that he is "not here to lecture" and "not here to tell other people how to live, what to do, who to be, or how to worship." He'll say that, "This is not a battle between different faiths, different sects, or different civilizations," but "a battle between good and evil." Trump often used anti-Islamic rhetoric during his presidential campaign and repeatedly stressed the need to say the words "radical Islamic terrorism." That phrase was missing from a draft of the speech obtained by The Associated Press last week. President Donald Trump is thanking Kuwait for its help in the fight against terror — and is pledging to update the public on their efforts soon. Trump says during a meeting with the Emir of Kuwait on Sunday that he'll hold a news conference in two weeks to discuss the battle against the Islamic State group. He's also praising the U.S.'s relationship with Kuwait and, in particular, the wealthy nation's frequent purchases of American military equipment. The Emir of Kuwait also invited the president to visit. Trump has been holding a whirlwind of meetings with Arab leaders in Saudi Arabia in the hours before he delivers a speech on how the Islamic world can help fight extremism. A senior Israeli Cabinet minister has voiced concern about the U.S.'s $110 billion arms deal with Saudi Arabia. Yuval Steinitz, a confidant of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, said Israeli officials will have to "hear the explanations" of the deal when President Donald Trump arrives in Israel on Monday. Steinitz says it is crucial that Israel maintain its military edge over its Arab neighbors, despite warming ties with Sunni Arab countries like Saudi Arabia. Steinitz says, "This is not a country that we have diplomatic relations with" and that it "is still a hostile country and nobody knows what the future holds." Steinitz says the deal is "definitely something that should trouble us." First lady Melania Trump paid a visit to the American International School in Riyadh on Sunday while her husband held a series of bilateral meetings with Arab leaders. The first lady delivered Dr. Seuss books to a pre-school classroom, spoke to sixth graders on a soccer field and clapped along to a rendition of "Lean on me" in the school's library. She was joined by the Saudi education minister. It's the first lady's first visit to the country and her first experience representing the U.S. on a foreign stage. The White House says it's aware that North Korea has launched a midrange ballistic missile in the North's latest weapons test. White House officials traveling in Saudi Arabia with President Donald Trump say the system, which was last tested in February, has a shorter range than the missiles launched in North Korea's most recent tests. South Korea's military says the missile was fired Sunday from an area near the North Korean capital of Pyongyang. The U.S. has sought to push back against North Korea's work to speed up the development its nuclear weapons and missile program. President Donald Trump is joining with leaders of the Gulf Cooperation Council in an effort to counter the financing of terrorism. White House adviser Dina Powell tells reporters that a memorandum of understanding signed by the U.S. and GCC nations represents the "farthest reaching commitment" to not finance terrorist organizations. She says it includes a pledge to prosecute the financing of terrorism, including individuals. Along with the U.S., the participants include Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. The White House did not immediately release a text of the agreement. Trump and the GCC leaders watched as Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Nayef and U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson exchanged documents. President Donald Trump is making plans for another foreign trip as he eases into his first. Trump said Sunday he would accept an invitation made by Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sissi to visit Egypt. Trump said the visit would happen before long. Trump is also calling el-Sissi his "friend" and praising him for the release of U.S. aid worker Aya Hijazi, who had been held captive for three years. Through a translator, el-Sissi said Trump "had a unique personality" that allowed him "to do the impossible." President Donald Trump says that he and the Emir of Qatar will discuss the purchase of "lots of beautiful military equipment." Trump and Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani met Sunday morning in Riyadh in a bilateral meeting. The president said the two nations had been "friends for a long time." He added that "no one makes" military equipment like the United States and said a deal would create jobs for the U.S. and security for Qatar. The potion of the meeting open to reporters did not include any discussion of human rights in Qatar. The nation has come under scrutiny for the harsh conditions faced by workers building the venues for the 2022 World Cup. President Donald Trump is beginning his day of meetings with Arab leaders with the King of Bahrain. Trump says the two countries "have a wonderful relationship" but "there has been a little strain." He vowed Sunday to improve things further. Trump did not specify what tension he needed to resolve. The two countries have had a long-term military alliance though the U.S. Was critical of Bahrain's response to uprisings during the Arab Spring. The King of Bahrain also praised the two nations' long-term alliance. Trump is set to have a day of meetings before delivering a major speech to the Muslim world urging unity in the fight against terror. President Donald Trump is kicking off the second day of his first foreign trip abroad with a series of bilateral and group meetings with foreign leaders. Trump will meet with leaders from Bahrain, Qatar, Egypt, Kuwait, and other countries before delivering a speech on fighting extremism. The president will urge leaders in the region to "drive out the terrorists from your places of worship." That's according to a draft of the speech obtained by The Associated Press. He'll also attend the opening of the new Global Center for Combating Extremist Ideology. President Donald Trump is using the nation that is home to Islam's holiest site as a backdrop to call for unity across the Muslim world in the fight against terrorism. In Trump's Sunday speech, which is the centerpiece of his two-day visit to Saudi Arabia, he will address 50 Muslim and Arab leaders and urge them to "drive out the terrorists from your places of worship." That's according to a draft of the speech obtained by The Associated Press. Trump's presidential campaign was frequently punctuated by bouts of anti-Islamic rhetoric. He is now poised to soften some of his language about the Muslim faith. Though during the campaign Trump repeatedly stressed the need to say the words "radical Islamic terrorism," that phrase is not included in the draft.


News Article | May 26, 2017
Site: en.prnasia.com

NORTON, Mass., May 26, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Currently at Wheaton College in Massachusetts there is a room full of 18 college age students spending a week of their summers from May 22nd to May 26th at the second ever Meaning Makers Social Entrepreneurship Boot Camp held by the Global Center for Social Entrepreneurship Network (GCSEN). These 18 peers, both genders equally represented, are learning how to make sustainable social impact with their truly innovative ventures. The breadth of these ideas would astound you and amongst GCSEN's students there are budding entrepreneurs focused on: reducing bullying rates in schools, teaching how to best implement technology in schools, making beauty products less harmful on skin, providing stress relief for Syrian refugees and so many more awe-inspiring passions. The GCSEN Foundation is a ground-breaking program sponsored by the Diana Davis Spencer Foundation. Diana Davis Spencer is a visionary philanthropist and Wheaton College class of '60 alumnae who saw the transformative power of teaching college students how to start their own social enterprises. The Meaning Makers Boot Camp is designed to inspire, teach, and support college students. These students are experiencing the importance of social entrepreneurship and learning key methods and frameworks used for actualizing their visions of helping move the world to a better place. To do this they will focus on creating a "4P-Impact©" people, profit, planet, and place. GCSEN does this by teaching students to think both globally and locally when considering how to make a change. The President of Wheaton College, Dennis Hanno, one of America's most innovative and effective college presidents, understands the power of the GCSEN model for change and the power of a 4P-Impact focus for millennial students. He established Wheaton College as GCSEN's national pilot campus. In President Hanno's words, "I believe that innovative social entrepreneurs can create the kind of change we need now to address the critical problems we are facing. Wheaton has chosen to work with GCSEN so that our students can develop the confidence and skills needed to become true change makers." Wheaton is committed to creating opportunities and hiring former students like Luke O'Neill creative writing major and graduate of the Meaning Maker Boot Camp '16. He has his own business called Wolf and Tiger Games that is in the development process creating a Tabletop Role-Playing game thanks to the teaching of GCSEN foundation. He came to the Meaning Makers Boot Camp a year ago with an idea to start a board and role-playing game company with my friend. He had the belief that by focusing on physical games, together they could move people away from their digital screen isolation and depression. By the end of the boot camp he left with a plan to create our tabletop role-playing game. He and his business partner, Deen Naji, will use the game as a platform to work with community centers and engage people through games and help reduce stress and anxiety levels across the country. Deen Naji had previously used role-playing games as a way to overcome depression. Both Luke and Deen want to spread that relief to those who are suffering. He has now been hired by GCSEN to write short biographies for their 18 certified Meaning Maker entrepreneurs. When asked about his belief on writing for others he said, "Every person is the main character in their own story and I want to tell those stories." Luke O'Neill grew from his experiences with GCSEN and other college students can as well. GCSEN is increasing confidence in college students and raising their ability to make meaning and make money for real, before graduation. Professor Mike Caslin, the founder of GCSEN, has built a world class program that offers social entrepreneurship education from staff members who are best in class, experienced members of the business world in their own right. This world renowned program is practical, academically rigorous, and action oriented. GCSEN also supports its students beyond the summer boot camp with its recently launched web-based THEOS Community (Together We Help Each Other Succeed). It is a life-long alumni support community that includes coaching, professional references, access to capital, access to a social enterprise incubator and accelerator, advanced manufacturing, and intrapreneur/entrepreneur networking opportunities. Of the current 18 students, there are people from across the United States and from five different countries around the world. GCSEN has students from: Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Oregon, New York, Connecticut as well as from Quito, Ecuador; Hongzhou, China; Chongqing, China; Gibenyi, Rwanda; and Mumbai, India. These students: Adaeze Anaebonam,  Amber-Marie Wright, Claudine Humure, Dami Olubusi, Darshil Rathod, Enyu Wang, Gracie Callaghan, Heather Rothman, Joshua Alabre, Kyle McNicoll, Mateo Espinosa, Matthew Wollrath, Nathaniel Chretian-Mansur, Patrick Wang, Rebecca Rosenzweig, Richard Davies, Sol Martinez, and Sophia Hatzikos have similarly come to GCSEN with issues they care deeply about and solutions they want to focus on just like the previous boot camp did a year before them. In this program the students will gain the skills they need to advance their ideas and move the world to a better place. GCSEN's innovative flipped classroom is using a program developed for NASA called "Think Tank". In using Think Tank, students were asked to place a slider on a number between 1 and 100. The number indicated how confident they felt about being able to launch their business. At the start of the day students averaged at 64% confidence towards their goal. By the end of just the first day that number had already increased to 77%. By the end of the fourth day the average confidence score had been raised to 89.9%. GCSEN believes that millennials using social entrepreneurship will be the most productive and practical driving force for peace and prosperity around the globe. They have also designed their program using the leading edge MIT-edx learning platform, which is currently being used by 300 of the world's top universities. GCSEN's mission is to accelerate social entrepreneurship in higher education through innovative programs and learning technologies. Their goal for this week is to help put each student one step closer to launching a 4P Venture. GCSEN is encouraging college students to step out of their comfort zones, struggle towards enlightenment and then return to teach those insights to others, spreading GCSEN style learning to even more people around the world. GCSEN is a trail blazer in a rapidly growing global social entrepreneurship movement. GCSEN is an emerging global leader in accelerating social entrepreneurship for college students not only in the United States but also globally. They are well on their way towards making their vision happen. With more visionary sponsors, college campus partners and students they will achieve their transformative scale. By 2027, GCSEN is projected to be working with 100 colleges, 100,000 college students, and 10,000 4P social enterprises. From the 18 students in this room you can see the forming of a powerful movement. Come join GCSEN in making meaning and making money and making a difference.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

A handout picture provided by the Saudi Royal Palace on May 22, 2017, shows US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump waving as they board Air Force One before leaving Riyadh for Israel (AFP Photo/BANDAR AL-JALOUD) Riyadh (AFP) - Saudi King Salman on Monday described US President Donald Trump's visit to the Muslim kingdom in the Gulf as a "turning point" in relations between the two countries. Trump on Monday concluded his landmark visit to Saudi Arabia, which he chose for his first foreign trip since taking office in January, during which the allies announced arms deals and investments worth hundreds of billions of dollars. "This is a turning point in relations between the two countries," Salman told his council of ministers, according to state news agency SPA. He said relations between the two countries will advance from a partnership to the "level of strengthening consultations, cooperation and coordination on all fronts". The king also praised an "historic agreement" between Gulf monarchies and Washington "to take firm measures to target the financing of terrorism" and the setting up of a Riyadh-based centre for this task, SPA said. The ministers also hailed the launch of the Global Center for Combating Extremist Ideology in Riyadh on Sunday. Dubbed "Etital", Arabic for moderation, the centre "embodies the kingdom's great efforts and its ongoing fight against terrorism", SPA reported. In his first foreign speech, Trump on Sunday urged Muslim leaders to take a stand against violence committed in the name of religion, describing the struggle against extremism as a "battle between good and evil".


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Sacramento, CA, February 13, 2017 --( Prior to joining Delegata’s team, Dave was an associate partner at IBM, as a senior member of the SAP Global Center of Competence, charged with optimizing delivery models of IT solution deployments. He has also served as a Principle and Client Partner for Capgemini, and the Managing Director for Utopia Middle East — a solutions provider for managing big data and strategic analytics. Prior to specializing in IT, his repertoire of experience includes executive positions at Boeing, TWA, and Rockwell International. "I am excited to join Delegata as they are truly an exceptional organization," said Dave. "Their reputation for quality and strategic partnership with federal and state departments, as well as private companies, is unsurpassed. I look forward to extending Delegata’s impressive list of customers and being part of the team to plan for the future." Kais Menoufy, CEO and President of Delegata added, "Dave’s diverse experiences and technical expertise will further enrich our team and our solution offerings. We are delighted to welcome him to the Delegata family, and look forward to providing our clients with continued success and the best of the best in the market." Dave has worked across a range of sectors in the USA, Australia, Asia Pacific, Middle East, and Europe. He holds an MBA from Chapman University, a PhD in International Relations from La Salle University, an MA in Political Science from UCLA, and a BA with Magna Cum Laude designation in Political Science from University of Missouri in St. Louis. He also holds a certificate of Designing and Leading Competitive Supply Chains from Penn State. Delegata is where public and private organizations "delegate" their technology and management challenges. From IT megaproject integration to organizational change management, from enterprise architecture to business intelligence, Delegata’s InSourcing® and Diamond® methodologies have delivered award-winning solutions for clients across local, state, and international markets. For more information, visit www.delegata.com. Sacramento, CA, February 13, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Delegata Corporation recently welcomed Dave Marzouk as the Vice President of Global Operations. Dave is poised to lead Delegata’s growth and build upon the company’s success in management and technology consulting.Prior to joining Delegata’s team, Dave was an associate partner at IBM, as a senior member of the SAP Global Center of Competence, charged with optimizing delivery models of IT solution deployments. He has also served as a Principle and Client Partner for Capgemini, and the Managing Director for Utopia Middle East — a solutions provider for managing big data and strategic analytics. Prior to specializing in IT, his repertoire of experience includes executive positions at Boeing, TWA, and Rockwell International."I am excited to join Delegata as they are truly an exceptional organization," said Dave. "Their reputation for quality and strategic partnership with federal and state departments, as well as private companies, is unsurpassed. I look forward to extending Delegata’s impressive list of customers and being part of the team to plan for the future."Kais Menoufy, CEO and President of Delegata added, "Dave’s diverse experiences and technical expertise will further enrich our team and our solution offerings. We are delighted to welcome him to the Delegata family, and look forward to providing our clients with continued success and the best of the best in the market."Dave has worked across a range of sectors in the USA, Australia, Asia Pacific, Middle East, and Europe. He holds an MBA from Chapman University, a PhD in International Relations from La Salle University, an MA in Political Science from UCLA, and a BA with Magna Cum Laude designation in Political Science from University of Missouri in St. Louis. He also holds a certificate of Designing and Leading Competitive Supply Chains from Penn State.Delegata is where public and private organizations "delegate" their technology and management challenges. From IT megaproject integration to organizational change management, from enterprise architecture to business intelligence, Delegata’s InSourcing® and Diamond® methodologies have delivered award-winning solutions for clients across local, state, and international markets. For more information, visit www.delegata.com. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Delegata


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

LOS ANGELES--(BUSINESS WIRE)--A new analysis by Korn Ferry (NYSE:KFY), the preeminent global people and organizational advisory firm, finds that CEOs are the oldest and longest-tenured individuals compared with other prominent C-suite roles. By contrast, the study found CMOs and CIOs are the youngest and shortest-tenured. The Korn Ferry Institute study of the top 1,000 U.S. companies by revenue was conducted in late 2016. It examines the age and tenure of individuals holding C-suite titles (CEO, CFO, CHRO, CMO, CIO), and is also broken down by industry - consumer, energy, financial services, industrials, life sciences, professional services, and technology. When analyzed in the aggregate, the average age for a C-suite member is 54 and the average tenure is 5.3 years. However, the numbers vary depending on title and industry. The average age for a CEO across industries is 58, with the oldest average CEO age 60 in financial services and the youngest 55 in the technology sector. In terms of tenure, the average CEO tenure is 8 years. Those in financial services have the longest tenure, 9.7 years, and those in energy have the shortest tenure, 6.1 years. “It makes sense that for large, complex companies, the executive who holds the highest leadership position would have more and diverse experiences, which would translate to more years in the workforce,” said Tierney Remick, vice chairman, Korn Ferry Board and CEO Services. “Immediately following the 2008 Great Recession we saw many boards asking their CEOs to continue to lead and navigate through an unprecedented period of dynamic change and ultimately, recovery.” The average CFO age at 53 represents the middle of the pack for C-suite members. There isn’t much variance in the age of CFOs among industries, with an average age of 54 for financial services and life sciences, and an average age of 53 for the other industries (consumer, energy, industrials, professional services and technology). As for tenure, behind the CEO, the CFO is the longest-tenured C-suite member at an average of 5.1 years, with the longest-tenured CFOs in the life sciences industry at an average of 6 years, and the shortest-tenured CFOs in the technology and industrial sectors at an average of 4.9 years. “In 2016 we saw internal promotions of CFOs vs. external hires jump to 58 percent, up from just 40 percent the previous year. We’re also finding that a contributing factor to the longer tenure of CFOs are boards, which are taking the time to create robust succession management processes to ensure chosen candidates are a good fit, and therefore stay longer,” said Bryan Proctor, senior client partner, Korn Ferry CFO Practice. Behind the CEO, the CHRO is the oldest C-suite member at an average age of 55. Life sciences and energy tie for the oldest average CHRO at 56, and professional services has the youngest average CHRO at 54. The average tenure for a CHRO across industries is 5.0 years. Energy has the longest-tenured CHRO average at 5.3 years and industrial has the youngest-tenured CHRO at 4.6 years. “CHROs are in the business of relationship building, and that takes time,” said Joseph McCabe, vice chair, Korn Ferry HR Global Center of Expertise. “Once those relationships are built, the CHRO’s value to the organization is even greater and hence the longer tenure.” The average CMO age is 52, with CMOs in the life sciences and professional services sectors the oldest average age at 54. The youngest average age of CMOs is 50 in the consumer sector. The average tenure of a CMO is the lowest of all C-suite titles, at an average of 4.1 years. The longest average CMO tenure is in the financial services industry at 5.1 years, and life sciences CMOs stay on average a full two years less at only 3.1 years. The average CMO in the consumer industry stays 3.6 years. “Today’s customer-centric CMO role is exceptionally complex and requires the right balance of left as well as right brain skills, and very importantly, a differentiated set of leadership competencies,” said Caren Fleit, senior client partner and leader of Korn Ferry’s Marketing Center of Expertise. “CMOs with this unique profile are in high demand and are often recruited to lead the next transformation. Also, in some cases, short tenure can be attributed to the organization not being well aligned behind the change that the CMO is tasked with leading.” The CIO is on average the youngest in the C-suite at age 51, with the youngest average CIO age in the consumer industry at 47, and the oldest in industrials at 54. The average tenure for the CIO is 4.3 years, with CIOs in the consumer, energy, and professional services sectors tying for the longest-average tenure at 4.5 years. The shortest-tenured CIO is in the industrial sector at an average of 4.0 years. “The pace of change is rapid and the breadth of increasing responsibilities continues to reconfirm the importance of the CIO role,” said Craig Stephenson, managing director of the North America CIO Practice. “CIOs continuously rise to the challenge and it’s common for this executive profile to leave after a few years, not because of dissatisfaction, but because the challenge they set out to accomplish is achieved and other, perhaps larger, opportunities await.” Korn Ferry is the preeminent global people and organizational advisory firm. We help leaders, organizations, and societies succeed by releasing the full power and potential of people. Our nearly 7,000 colleagues deliver services through our Executive Search, Hay Group and Futurestep divisions. Visit kornferry.com for more information. Editor’s Note: Infographic can be found here

Loading Global Center collaborators
Loading Global Center collaborators