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Altadena, CA, United States

Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 772.98K | Year: 2012

Global Aerospace Corporation (GAC) proposes to carry out the prototype development of a Missile Deployed Aerial Platform (MDAP) that is capable of instantly providing communications, intelligence, surveillance, and/or reconnaissance capabilities to the battlefield warfighter. Real time battlefield information, from communications and situational awareness assets, is becoming more critical to commanders for moment-to-moment decision-making. To address this need, GAC proposes a disposable satellite-like aerial platform. GAC's approach satisfies the Army's need for an aerial platform that can instantly be deployed above a battlefield by a missile and that is designed to support Army Enterprise payloads. One concept of operations has a payload and stowed aerial platform being placed into the weapon bay of a tactical missile. The missile and platform are then programmed for launch and deployment, respectively, at a desired geographic location and altitude above a battlefield. GAC's concept is lightweight and low-cost; has a selectable deployment altitude and target range; achieves high-speed deceleration and orientation of missile forebody for platform deployment; incorporates a controller that initiates deployment; features a reliable and robust deployment method; and finally, easily scales up to larger missile size, for larger Army payloads or higher altitude, with little increase in unit cost.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Missile Defense Agency | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 250.00K | Year: 2011

Global Aerospace Corporation (GAC), in collaboration with NASA"s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), plans to develop a prototype, high-fidelity, first principle-based, comprehensive, and user-friendly software model to predict the long-term behavior of advanced rechargeable lithium batteries in aerospace applications. This Li-Ion battery operation model will 1) incorporate in one tool, for the first time, all the state-of-the-art first-principles Li-Ion cell physics and chemistry available; 2) be able to make reasonably accurate predictions of performance and life at both the cell and battery level for a variety of cell manufacturers, provided appropriate cell parameters are available; 3) facilitate the extension and advancement of the first-principles model because of the object-oriented nature of the code; and 4) be extremely user-friendly. In Phase II, we will extend the capability of the model developed in Phase I by incorporating additional cell and battery design and operational conditions that affect degradation and performance predictions. In Phase II we will validate the model using LEO-cycling cell and battery laboratory test data. Finally, we will demonstrate that the prototype battery operation model can predict the performance and life of batteries of a space mission.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 69.99K | Year: 2010

Global Aerospace Corporation (GAC) proposes to carry out the development of a Missile Deployed Aerial Platform (MDAP) that is capable of instantly providing communications, intelligence, surveillance, and/or reconnaissance capabilities to the battlefield warfighter. Real time battlefield information, from communications and situational awareness assets, is becoming more critical to commanders for moment-to-moment decision-making. To address this need, GAC proposes a disposable satellite-like aerial platform. GAC's approach satisfies the Army's need for an aerial platform that can instantly be deployed above a battlefield by a missile and that is designed to support Army Enterprise payloads. One concept of operations has a payload and stowed aerial platform being placed into the weapon bay of a tactical missile. The missile and platform are then programmed for launch and deployment, respectively, at a desired geographic location and altitude above a battlefield. GAC's concept is lightweight and low-cost; has a selectable deployment altitude and target range; achieves high-speed deceleration and orientation of missile forebody for platform deployment; incorporates a controller that initiates deployment; features a reliable and robust deployment method; and finally, easily scales up to larger missile size, for larger Army payloads or higher altitude, with little increase in unit cost.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Missile Defense Agency | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2009

In this overall program, Global Aerospace Corporation (GAC), its consultants, and future industrial partners, plans to develop a high fidelity, computationally-efficient, first principles-based software model to predict the behavior of rechargeable lithium-ion batteries under a wide set of conditions including extended calendar life (for both shelf life and on-bus trickle-charge conditions), low temperature operation, and wide variations in power loads for satellite applications for a number of Earth orbits. The key to this effort is developing computationally-efficient, full-physics models of Li-ion battery performance that are applicable for 3 types of Earth orbits of interest. The orbits include Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO), Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) and Highly Elliptical Orbit (HEO). Under these profiles batteries are subjected to minimum cycling and lengthy periods of continuous low rate charge. The goal is to provide a tool for managers and operations personnel to project life and performance of Li-Ion batteries in GEO, MEO and HEO Orbits. In Phase I, GAC, along with its research partner and consultant, plans to develop models of degradation mechanisms, implement them in computationally-efficient computer code, and verify the models against laboratory data.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Missile Defense Agency | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 300.00K | Year: 2010

The expected life of satellite Li-Ion batteries is determined by many factors, including thermal considerations, electrode chemistries, orbit and mission life, DOD, and pulse power requirements. First-principles battery model literature pertains primarily to orbital cycling at moderate DOD under isothermal conditions without variable power loads. Knowledge must be extended to encompass wider life parameters, thereby providing managers with valid predictive tools to study mission scenarios on which to base their decisions. Global Aerospace Corporation (GAC), in collaboration with its research partner, Washington University (WU), plans to develop, demonstrate, and validate a prototype a high-fidelity, first principles-based Li-Ion battery operations tool, called Dakota, that will predict the performance of cells and batteries in LEO orbit under a variety of operational conditions (orbit cycling, pulse-power, and long-term operation). The key to this effort is developing computationally-efficient, full-physics models of Li-Ion cell performance. The goal is to provide a tool for managers, power system engineers and operations personnel to project life and performance of Li-Ion batteries in LEO. In Phase I, we successfully developed reformulated models of two different Li-Ion cells and chemistries, implemented them in computationally-efficient computer code in Dakota, and verified the Dakota simulations against benchmark data.

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