Altadena, CA, United States

Global Aerospace Corporation

www.gaerospace.com
Altadena, CA, United States
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Nock K.T.,Global Aerospace Corporation | Aaron K.M.,Global Aerospace Corporation | McKnight D.,Integrity Applications Incorporated
Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets | Year: 2013

Deorbit concepts have been proposed for dealing with the growing problems posed by orbital debris. Most devices use large structures that interact with the atmosphere, magnetic field, or solar environment to deorbit large objects more rapidly than natural decay. Some devices may be better than others relative to the likelihood of collisions during their use. Current guidelines attempt to address this risk by applying the metric of area-time product to compare the probability of a large object experiencing a debris-generating impact. However, this approach is valid only for collisions with very small debris objects. The peak in the distribution of the area of orbital debris occurs for objects with a characteristic size close to 2 m. For collisions with such objects, some of which are operating satellites, it is important to incorporate the augmented collision cross-sectional area, which takes into account the size of both colliding objects when computing the area-time product. This new approach leads to a more valid comparison among alternative deorbit approaches, which now indicates that inflatable drag enhancement devices result in the least risk. Finally, one deorbit device, an electromagnetic tether, is shown to have a very large collision cross section for disabling operating satellites.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Missile Defense Agency | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 300.00K | Year: 2010

The expected life of satellite Li-Ion batteries is determined by many factors, including thermal considerations, electrode chemistries, orbit and mission life, DOD, and pulse power requirements. First-principles battery model literature pertains primarily to orbital cycling at moderate DOD under isothermal conditions without variable power loads. Knowledge must be extended to encompass wider life parameters, thereby providing managers with valid predictive tools to study mission scenarios on which to base their decisions. Global Aerospace Corporation (GAC), in collaboration with its research partner, Washington University (WU), plans to develop, demonstrate, and validate a prototype a high-fidelity, first principles-based Li-Ion battery operations tool, called Dakota, that will predict the performance of cells and batteries in LEO orbit under a variety of operational conditions (orbit cycling, pulse-power, and long-term operation). The key to this effort is developing computationally-efficient, full-physics models of Li-Ion cell performance. The goal is to provide a tool for managers, power system engineers and operations personnel to project life and performance of Li-Ion batteries in LEO. In Phase I, we successfully developed reformulated models of two different Li-Ion cells and chemistries, implemented them in computationally-efficient computer code in Dakota, and verified the Dakota simulations against benchmark data.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 772.98K | Year: 2012

Global Aerospace Corporation (GAC) proposes to carry out the prototype development of a Missile Deployed Aerial Platform (MDAP) that is capable of instantly providing communications, intelligence, surveillance, and/or reconnaissance capabilities to the battlefield warfighter. Real time battlefield information, from communications and situational awareness assets, is becoming more critical to commanders for moment-to-moment decision-making. To address this need, GAC proposes a disposable satellite-like aerial platform. GAC's approach satisfies the Army's need for an aerial platform that can instantly be deployed above a battlefield by a missile and that is designed to support Army Enterprise payloads. One concept of operations has a payload and stowed aerial platform being placed into the weapon bay of a tactical missile. The missile and platform are then programmed for launch and deployment, respectively, at a desired geographic location and altitude above a battlefield. GAC's concept is lightweight and low-cost; has a selectable deployment altitude and target range; achieves high-speed deceleration and orientation of missile forebody for platform deployment; incorporates a controller that initiates deployment; features a reliable and robust deployment method; and finally, easily scales up to larger missile size, for larger Army payloads or higher altitude, with little increase in unit cost.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Missile Defense Agency | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2011

Rechargeable Lithium-Ion (Li-Ion) cell technology is attractive for MDA space satellites. But, because this technology is relatively new and is still evolving, its performance and behavior must be characterized by laboratory life testing that is very time consuming and expensive. A requirement for a 10-year real-time cell life test could delay the incorporation of Li-Ion cell technology into MDA satellites that are essential for national security. Accelerated life testing can be used to force cell degradation earlier than real time testing, enable identification of the source of the degradation, and speed the process of qualifying cell technology for space flight. However, there are questions of its applicability because cells are not operated exactly the same way during accelerated life tests as on satellite missions, and there is likelihood of introducing additional failure modes during accelerated testing. Global Aerospace Corporation (GAC), in collaboration with NASA"s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), plans to answer the question"is accelerated life cycle testing feasible for Li-Ion cells?"To answer this question, we will (a) develop test procedures and collect laboratory data and (b) develop a complementary high fidelity, first principles-based, verified software tool to assist and guide accelerated life testing laboratory work.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Missile Defense Agency | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 250.00K | Year: 2011

Global Aerospace Corporation (GAC), in collaboration with NASA"s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), plans to develop a prototype, high-fidelity, first principle-based, comprehensive, and user-friendly software model to predict the long-term behavior of advanced rechargeable lithium batteries in aerospace applications. This Li-Ion battery operation model will 1) incorporate in one tool, for the first time, all the state-of-the-art first-principles Li-Ion cell physics and chemistry available; 2) be able to make reasonably accurate predictions of performance and life at both the cell and battery level for a variety of cell manufacturers, provided appropriate cell parameters are available; 3) facilitate the extension and advancement of the first-principles model because of the object-oriented nature of the code; and 4) be extremely user-friendly. In Phase II, we will extend the capability of the model developed in Phase I by incorporating additional cell and battery design and operational conditions that affect degradation and performance predictions. In Phase II we will validate the model using LEO-cycling cell and battery laboratory test data. Finally, we will demonstrate that the prototype battery operation model can predict the performance and life of batteries of a space mission.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2011

Global Aerospace Corporation (GAC), and its research partner, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo (CPSLO), will develop an integrated Small Probe Reentry System (SPRS) for low Earth orbit (LEO) small satellite Earth reentry missions. The SPRS delivers the small probe to a targeted reentry, protects it from the harsh atmospheric reentry environment, slows it down so that it can land without damage to its payload, and announces its position for recovery. This technology will be applicable to very small satellites that could carry 1 kg sample return payload will experience a low-temperature rise and a low deceleration load.


Patent
Global Aerospace Corporation | Date: 2014-11-17

An inflatable aerodynamic deceleration method and system is provided for use with an atmospheric entry payload. The inflatable aerodynamic decelerator includes an inflatable envelope and an inflatant, wherein the inflatant is configured to fill the inflatable envelope to an inflated state such that the inflatable envelope surrounds the atmospheric entry payload, causing aerodynamic forces to decelerate the atmospheric entry payload.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Army | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 69.99K | Year: 2010

Global Aerospace Corporation (GAC) proposes to carry out the development of a Missile Deployed Aerial Platform (MDAP) that is capable of instantly providing communications, intelligence, surveillance, and/or reconnaissance capabilities to the battlefield warfighter. Real time battlefield information, from communications and situational awareness assets, is becoming more critical to commanders for moment-to-moment decision-making. To address this need, GAC proposes a disposable satellite-like aerial platform. GAC's approach satisfies the Army's need for an aerial platform that can instantly be deployed above a battlefield by a missile and that is designed to support Army Enterprise payloads. One concept of operations has a payload and stowed aerial platform being placed into the weapon bay of a tactical missile. The missile and platform are then programmed for launch and deployment, respectively, at a desired geographic location and altitude above a battlefield. GAC's concept is lightweight and low-cost; has a selectable deployment altitude and target range; achieves high-speed deceleration and orientation of missile forebody for platform deployment; incorporates a controller that initiates deployment; features a reliable and robust deployment method; and finally, easily scales up to larger missile size, for larger Army payloads or higher altitude, with little increase in unit cost.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 125.00K | Year: 2016

Your mission is to explore the atmosphere and surface of Saturn's moon, Titan, a cold, harsh environment that poses many technical challenges for any potential exploration platform. Imagine an inflatable, flying wing-glider that could enter Titan?s atmosphere from orbit, execute controlled movements in atmospheric flight, and descend to the surface for scientific measurement or payload delivery. The Titan-Buoyant Atmospheric Glider (T-BAG) system is a hybrid entry vehicle, balloon, and maneuverable glider with 3-D directional control that could satisfy all of these objectives while operating on the minimal power available from a Radioisotope Power Source (RPS). T-BAG's unique buoyancy control system is at the heart of the proposed innovation, enabling both ascending and descending glide without propulsion systems or control surfaces. Potential T-BAG mission applications include long-lived flight at low altitudes with revisit capability, high resolution surface imaging, in-situ measurements of precipitation, fog, volcanism, etc., and controlled, targeted delivery of landers to the surface.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2009

Global Aerospace Corporation proposes to develop a hypersonic control modeling and simulation tool for hypersonic aeroassist vehicles. Our control and simulation testbed will be focused on the particularly important problem of a lifting, towed ballute for planetary aerocapture. The importance of this technology innovation is in the understanding it can provide NASA on the control of hypersonic vehicles, in particular, of lifting towed ballutes. Lift control of a towed ballute will enable the use of smaller and lighter-weight ballutes for planetary orbit capture, which will make ballutes more attractive and feasible for missions to planets such as Neptune where high heating rates require extremely large ballutes for ballistic capture. The application of the comprehensive tool, to be developed in later phases, will be extensive including, but not limited to, control studies for entry and descent, aerocapture, and aero-gravity-assist with a range of hypersonic aeroassist systems (e.g. rigid and deployable aeroshells, waveriders, etc.). This proposal responds directly to the request in subtopic A2 to "leverage the foundational research to develop technologies and analytical tools focused on discipline-based solutions." In addition, in the hypersonic focus arena, we are responding directly to the interest in "system dynamic models incorporating the essential coupled dynamic elements with varying fidelity for control design, analysis and evaluation" and "simulation test beds for evaluating hypersonic concept vehicle control."

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