Glico Dairy Products Co.

Japan

Glico Dairy Products Co.

Japan
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Ishizuka A.,Glico Dairy Products Co. | Tomizuka K.,Fuji Women's University | Aoki R.,Glico Dairy Products Co. | Nishijima T.,Glico Dairy Products Co. | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering | Year: 2012

The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in endogenous bifidobacteria and administered . Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. . lactis (. B. lactis) GCL2505 (GCL2505) in the intestine after administration of GCL2505 by means of a randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind, cross-over study. An increase in the number of total bifidobacteria (the sum of . B. bifidum, . B. breve, . B. longum subsp. . longum, . B. adolescentis, . B. anglatum, . B. catenulatum, . B. pseudocatenulatum, . B. dentium, . B. longum subsp. . infantis and . B. lactis) in the feces were observed after administration of GCL2505 using species- and subspecies-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. However, the number of endogenous bifidobacteria species (excluding . B. lactis) remained unchanged. . B. lactis also became the predominant bifidobacterial species. Taking into account the number of GCL2505 administered, the findings further suggested that GCL2505 proliferated in the intestine. In addition, the defecation frequency increased during GCL2505 administration compared with the placebo. Moreover, a single administration study (n. =. 17) clearly demonstrated that GCL2505 successfully reached the intestine before proliferating at least 10-fold. This is the first report to show an increase in intestinal bifidobacteria, with no changes to the endogenous species, and improvements in constipation following proliferation of administered bifidobacteria. © 2012 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan.


PubMed | Ezaki Glico Co., Fuji Women's University and Glico Dairy Products Co.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Bioscience of microbiota, food and health | Year: 2015

Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis GCL2505 (B. lactis GCL2505) is able to survive passage through the intestines and proliferate. The daily dynamics of the intestinal bifidobacteria following ingestion of probiotics are not yet clear. Moreover, the effects of long-term ingestion of probiotics on the intestinal microbiota have not been well studied. Two experiments were performed in the present study. In Experiment 1, 53 healthy female volunteers received B. lactis GCL2505; B. bifidum GCL2080, which can survive but not proliferate in the intestine; or yogurt fermented with Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus for 2 weeks, and the daily dynamics of intestinal bifidobacteria were investigated. The number of fecal bifidobacteria significantly increased on day 1, and this was maintained until day 14 in the B. lactis GCL2505 ingestion group. However, no significant change in the number of fecal bifidobacteria was observed in the other groups throughout the ingestion period. In Experiment 2, 38 constipated volunteers received either B. lactis GCL2505 or a placebo for 8 weeks. Both the number of fecal bifidobacteria and the frequency of defecation significantly increased throughout the ingestion period in the B. lactis GCL2505 ingestion group. These results suggested that the proliferation of ingested bifidobacteria within the intestine contributed to a rapid increase in the amount of intestinal bifidobacteria and subsequent maintenance of these levels. Moreover, B. lactis GCL2505 improved the intestinal microbiota more effectively than non-proliferating bifidobacteria and lactic acid bacteria.


Shibata M.,Hokkaido University | Shibata M.,MC Food Specialties Inc. | Onodera K.,Hokkaido University | Onodera K.,Glico Dairy Products Co. | And 7 more authors.
Food Science and Technology Research | Year: 2014

The potential of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) extraction of "koku" enhancing compounds from dried herring fillet ("Migaki-nishin" in Japanese) and sturgeon liver was explored. "Koku" enhancing compounds from a water-soluble extract and a mixed water miscible SC-CO2 extract were isolated and evaluated for their effects on sensory perception. Results showed that only select compounds were found in the mixed water miscible SC-CO2 extract compared to the complicated composition of the water-soluble extract. A notable feature was that the mixed water miscible SC-CO2 extract contained "koku" enhancing compounds, e.g., nicotinamide, glycerol and creatine. This study revealed for the first time that these compounds were extracted by SC-CO2 extraction and that nicotinamide enhances "koku". We also extracted "koku" enhancing compounds from sturgeon liver using the SC-CO2 extraction technique. Instrumental analysis revealed that the sturgeon liver contained relatively large amounts of nicotinamide and glycerol. Thus, it is suggested that this technique might be applicable to the extraction of select compounds from fish and fishery by-products. Copyright © 2014, Japanese Society for Food Science and Technology


Takii H.,Glico Dairy Products Co. | Nishijima T.,Glico Dairy Products Co. | Takami K.,Glico Dairy Products Co. | Tanaka Y.,Glico Dairy Products Co. | And 4 more authors.
Japanese Pharmacology and Therapeutics | Year: 2012

The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in intestinal bifidobacteria and the effect on fecal properties in healthy subjects with mild constipation after administration of a fermented milk containing Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B. lactis) GCL2505. Volunteers (n=62 ; 15 male, 47 female ; 42.5±10.2 years [mean±SD]) were randomly divided into two groups and given 100 g of fermented milk containing B. lactis GCL2505 (>1×10 7cfu/g) or a placebo daily for 2 weeks in a double-blind crossover study. An increase in the number of total bifidobacteria (sum of B. bifidum, B. breve, B. longum subsp. longum, B. adolescente, B. angulatum, B. catenulatum, B. pseudocatenulatum, B. dentium, B. longum subsp. infantis, and B. lactis) was detected in feces after administration of the B. lactis GCL2505 fermented milk by species- and subspecies-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. The number of endogenous bifidobacteria species, excluding B. lactis, remained unchanged, and B. lactis became the predominant bifidobacterial species. Defecation frequency and stool quantity increased significantly (p < 0.05) during the B. lactis GCL2505 fermented milk ingesting period compared with placebo. These results indicate that GCL2505-fermented milk contributes to an increase in intestinal bifidobacteria by proliferating itself and to improvements in mild constipation without affecting endogenous bifidobacteria.


Aoki R.,Ezaki Glico Co. | Aoki R.,Glico Dairy Products Co. | Tsuchida S.,Kyoto Prefectural University | Arai Y.,Kyoto Prefectural University | And 5 more authors.
Food Science and Nutrition | Year: 2016

Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis GCL2505 has been shown to proliferate in the human intestine. The intestinal dynamics and physiological effects of GCL2505 as well as the mechanism underlying proliferation in the gut were investigated. GCL2505 showed markedly higher resistance to free bile acids (cholic and deoxycholic acids) than other bifidobacterial species. The intestinal dynamics of GCL2505 and B. longum ssp. longum JCM1217T was compared. The level of B. animalis ssp. lactis in the GCL2505-administered group was remarkably higher than that of B. longum in the JCM1217T-administered group. The distribution of B. animalis ssp. lactis through the intestine of the GCL2505-administered group revealed that GCL2505 proliferated in the cecum. The physiological effects of GCL2505 and JCM 1217T were investigated. The cecal IgA level in the GCL2505-administered group was significantly higher than that in the nontreated control group. In contrast, the JCM 1217T-administered group did not manifest any change in the cecal IgA level. Mucin excretion in the GCL2505-administered group was significantly higher than that in the JCM 1217T-administered group. The thickness of the sulfomucin layer of the colon in the GCL2505-administered group tended to be higher than that in the JCM 1217T-administered group. In a loperamide-induced constipation model, fecal excretion in the GCL2505-administered group was significantly increased compared with that in the loperamide-treated control group. Short-chain fatty acid concentration in the GCL2505-administered group was significantly higher than that in the loperamide-treated control group. These results indicate that the level of proliferation of probiotics in the intestine correlates with the magnitude of host physiological responses, such as IgA production and mucin secretion, which possibly affect gastrointestinal functions such as bowel movement to counteract constipation. GCL2505 exhibits high tolerance to secondary bile acids, which partially explains its higher rate of proliferation in the large intestine. © 2016 The Authors. Food Science & Nutrition published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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