Scotland, United Kingdom
Scotland, United Kingdom

The Glasgow School of Art is Scotland's only public self-governing art school offering university level programmes and research in architecture, fine art and design. The school is housed in one of Glasgow's most famous buildings, often considered the masterpiece of Charles Rennie Mackintosh and built between 1897 and 1909. The building was severely damaged by fire in May 2014. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 4.01M | Year: 2013

The ADAPT-r ITN aims to significantly increase European research capacity through a unique and ground-breaking research model: at its core is the development of a robust and sustainable ITN in an emergent Supra-Disciplinary field of research across a range of design and arts disciplines creative practice research. ADAPT-r will train new researchers, increase supervisory capacity, partner with private sector SMEs in research projects providing substantial opportunity for real world testing of the research and real world training, and introduce creative practice research methodologies to a new generation. The unique model proposed will enable ADAPT-r to substantially leverage the number of doctoral candidates within the ITN budget model maximising higher degree training opportunities. The research that is produced through the ADAPT-r ITN will contribute to a wider research effort to increase knowledge, understanding and quality of research in creative disciplines and its methods. The Marie Curie ITN funding will enable an existing bi-lateral research training relationship to be expanded to include multiple partners from across Europe to create a greatly enhanced international research training network with a long-term future. The ADAPT-r ITN will address identified deficits in EU research training for creative disciplines. Through training creative practice researchers in the explication and dissemination of tacit knowledges and latent cognitive resources the ADAPT-r ITN will make a substantive contribution to meeting EU 2020 priorities by building a new generation of creative practice researchers and research lead practitioners able to meet the complex and often competing demands of contemporary Europe. Implementation of the ADAPT-r ITN will result in 32 Fellowships, 8 training conferences, a major research conference, a major exhibition, three key books, and a web site providing public access to research and events.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 73.30K | Year: 2015

Healthcare associated infections (HAIs) caused by pathogens (infectious agents) such as MRSA, Norovirus, and Clostridium Difficile are a substantial problem in developed and developing countries and within the NHS. In addition to the distress caused to patients who are infected, the cost of HAIs to acute services in NHS Scotland was estimated in the 2007 national prevalence survey at £183 million. The World Health Organisation (2014) global surveillance report on antimicrobial resistance shows that a post-antibiotic era - in which common infections and minor injuries can kill - far from being an apocalyptic fantasy, is instead a very real possibility for the 21st Century. Within this ambit, work to prevent and control Healthcare Associated Infections can in no way rely solely on the production of new antibiotics. Rather, new thinking, new research and development, and new knowledge transfer activities are needed, drawing on knowledge from beyond traditional biomedical science. The applicants prior AHRC funded Visualising the Invisible (vis-invis) project is a good example of the contribution that the arts and humanities can begin to make through relevant multidisciplinary working. The vis-invis project investigated ways of making pathogens visible in the context of the hospital ward in a multi-disciplinary collaboration involving a team from design, art, nursing and clinical microbiology. In the study, the team explored conceptions and perceptions of pathogens in relation to clinical settings, and produced prototype digital visualisations which aimed to make the pathogens visible in the context of the hospital ward. From this project, through a series of workshops with key stakeholders including infection control leads, nurses and domestic staff, one of the key findings was that the adaptation of the visualisations for use in training software for healthcare staff would have significant value. This was not foreseen at the outset of the project but emerge through the development of the prototypes and in response to feedback from the workshops. It was clear from these discussions that using the visualisations as part of training would extend the potential of this earlier work to impact in a timely and valuable way - especially given the current scale of the HAI problem and the threat of increasing resistance of pathogens to antibiotics. Working with a leading UK commercial company in the area of infection control, which specialises in the manufacture of antimicrobial products and infection-control training, two NHS Trusts and a leading microbiology specialist, this follow-on project proposal will create a visual training application, running on a tablet device, which can innovatively exploit existing context-relevant data about the nature, location and prevalence of the pathogens associated with HAIs. The visualisations will make clear the direct relationship between the ward setting and the location, behaviour, causes of spread, and prevention of spread of pathogens. The NHS project partners will be closely involved in the specification, co-design, development and evaluation of the training tool to ensure it satisfies the requirements of current NHS training programmes and to maximise the opportunities for its adoption.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 122.50K | Year: 2012

Glasgow is widely recognised, alongside London, as the major hub of artistic creativity and practice over the past two decades, with roots stretching beyond this period over the past thirty to forty years. Glasgow remains the largest centre of creative enterprise, activity and practice outside London, and a major influence on the development of contemporary art of the last quarter century. It has been the source of a renaissance whose impact has been felt in the UK and worldwide. But what happened to make a particular group of artists and talent coalesce over this period? And how can insight from Glasgows recent history help ensure that the city remains a creative centre with the right conditions for creativity and artistic practice?\n\nThe project draws on evidence sources from four main strands of enquiry. These include the archives of Glasgows two main contemporary arts venues of the period, the Third Eye Centre and the Centre for Contemporary Art (CCA) that superseded it. These are combined with insights from the Cordelia and George Oliver archive - a personal archive of an important art critic, commentator and collector from the period in question - that shed another unique, albeit personal perspective. The next strand of evidence comes from recordings made by curators at the time of various events and shows at the main Glasgow venues. Lastly, we draw on the insights of the artists themselves, through a unique arrangement of artist interviewing artists, led by our co-investigator on the project. While there have been other attempts to write a history of this period, none have had the privileged access to this range of evidence as our proposed research group.\n\nPart of the unique strength of our proposal is in the make up of our project team. Our principal investigator, Francis McKee, splits his time between being a Senior Researcher at Glasgow School of Art and his role as Director of CCA in Glasgow. As such, his motivations for the project combine his academic inquisitiveness, with his understanding of the practical and strategic need for this type of project in order to support on-going work and development of the CCA as an organisation as well as the artists that come through its doors.\n\nOur co-investigator, Ross Sinclair, again combines two main activities within his professional career. While, like Francis, holding a part-time Senior Research post at Glasgow School of Art, Ross also maintains a portion of his working week to concentrate on his professional practice as one of Scotlands leading contemporary artists. Ross is intimately linked to the subject matter of this proposal and uniquely placed to lead on the Artist to Artists strand that involves re-visiting artists in their work-spaces and drawing on memories to illuminate the role of Glasgow in their work and development.\n\nAssisting Francis and Ross, we propose to draw on the skills of Susannah Waters, an experienced archivist, who has responsibility for the Cordelia and George Oliver archive, and Glasgow School of Arts institutional archive collections, which may also provide useful additional insight. Carrie Skinner, who would be working as a Research Assistant, also brings existing knowledge of the Third Eye and CCA archives, having undertaken some initial investigation of these on behalf of CCA.\n\nAs the sources that we propose investigating are largely un-tapped, we are unsure about what they will uncover. However, we are confident that as a result of this project, we will be in a position to make significant progress towards further understanding of what was, in the mid-90s termed The Glasgow Miracle. We expect that our investigations will open further lines of enquiry, relating to sub-groups of artists, influence into Europe and beyond, as well as comparative exploration of the development of other cities and how what has happened within the the Glasgow contemporary art scene can be both continued and perhaps replicated elsewhere.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 97.00K | Year: 2012

To develop and embed the capability to undertake detailed performance evaluation in sustainable, low energy housing and utilise findings to influence future architectural design.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 134.69K | Year: 2013

The ACCORD project seeks to examine the opportunities and implications of digital visualisation technologies for community engagement and research through the co-creation of three-dimensional (3D) models of historic monuments and places. Despite their increasing accessibility, techniques such as laser scanning, 3D modelling and 3D printing have remained firmly in the domain of heritage specialists. Expert forms of knowledge and/or professional priorities frame the use of digital visualisation technologies, and forms of community-based social value are rarely addressed. Consequently, the resulting digital objects fail to engage communities as a means of researching and representing their heritage, despite the now widespread recognition of the importance of community engagement and social value in the heritage sector. The ACCORD project aims to address this gap through the co-design and co-production of an integrated research asset that addresses social value and engages communities with transformative digital technologies. ACCORD will create a permanently archived open-access dataset of community co-produced 3D digital models of archaeological sites and monuments, integrated with expressions of social value and contextual documentation. The project will actively engage community groups that have ongoing relationships to heritage places in the process of creating 3D records and models of those places. With the support of visualisation technologists, community engagement practitioners, and experts in social value, each community group will design, direct and produce their own 3D objects. The use of digital technologies to enhance and generate forms of social significance will be an important outcome, adding distinctive value to existing heritage assets and our understandings of them. Community groups will be able to draw on the resulting digital datasets for various purposes, such as public presentation, education, and tourism initiatives. The records and models resulting from the project will also provide important research resources for community groups, heritage managers and academic researchers. Evaluation will be an integral aspect of ACCORD project, examining the relationships between community groups, digital heritage professionals and the outputs they have created. This will include a review of the transformative aspects of the process, investigating changes in attitudes to 3D recording technologies during the life of the project, as well as the forms of significance, authenticity and value acquired by the resulting 3D objects. Ultimately, through the co-production of an open-access dataset, and the creation of a community of communities engaged in sharing skills and experiences, ACCORD seeks to broaden capacity for the creation and reuse of digital visualisation technologies in community heritage activities and research.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 35.76K | Year: 2016

Awareness of the impacts of climate change, rising energy prices, fuel poverty and a demand for energy security have prompted significant changes in design thinking, construction practice, building materials and building legislation aimed at reducing energy use and carbon dioxide emissions. A particular example of this is the fabric first approach and increasing requirements for air-tightness in housing. Whilst this achieves a primary objective of reducing heat loss through ventilation, other requirements for ventilation have not kept pace and there is emerging evidence of poor indoor air quality and inadequate ventilation. This in turn has been linked to a multitude of public health issues, particularly for conditions such as asthma, allergies and COPD that are all known to be exacerbated by poor air quality. Our goal is to bring public health and building professionals together with architects and their clients to identify shared research questions and develop ways of addressing these issues, with an overall aim of supporting the design of healthy, low energy homes. Despite shared interests between the built environment, environmental health and medical research communities, they are generally not well connected. Indeed there is also very little connection between the housing research and fuel poverty communities as well. The programme therefore aims to bridge the gap between these complementary fields, providing a platform for discussion and collaboration while facilitating knowledge exchange to the built environment industries, such as housing associations and architects. The programme will involve a trans-disciplinary team comprising of academics and industry professionals from the fields of respiratory health, indoor air quality and the built environment.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 113.08K | Year: 2015

To develop knowledge of the performance of retrofit measures to buildings, develop a capability to undertake building performance evaluation in the energy and environmental refurbishment of existing housing and relate this to architectural design.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 74.56K | Year: 2015

The 1938 British Empire Exhibition was a stunning display of architectural achievement and a reflection of the life and culture of Glasgow, the UK and the Commonwealth. The event was of huge international significance and continues to be relevant to the study of British social and industrial history and modernist architecture. In 2006, the British Empire Exhibition, Glasgow 1938 project (run by Glasgow School of Arts Digital Design Studio) produced a well-researched and constructed, photo-real, 3D model of the over 100 principal buildings and structures that comprised the Exhibition together with an accurate 3D map showing the relationship of the various buildings, road and pathways and water features, to the topography of Bellahouston Park. This project also created an archive of related cultural assets and video interviews recording opinions of experts in the fields of architecture and architectural history as well as the recollections of members of the public who attended the Exhibition in 1938. The primary aims of this project, Research Engagement through Virtual Immersive Tools for Learning (REVISIT Learning) are to transform the results of The British Empire Exhibition, Glasgow 1938 into innovative learning tools which are specifically targeted to school-age learners in terms of both age and curriculum, to make these learning tools as widely accessible as possible, and to increase our understanding of the impact of immersive learning tools for teachers and learners through a pilot study. This is a brand new group of users who are highly appropriate to share in the genuinely eye-opening and exciting results from previous British Empire Exhibition research. Existing 3D and 2D digital objects will be highlighted and explored, specifically targeting relevant curriculum areas (including both history and technology) for classes of students who will have the opportunity to not only interactively engage with the learning tools at various pedagogically-robust levels, but to also produce and contribute their own creative responses to the learning tools. This learning methodology not only addresses key curriculum areas (e.g. emphasis on technology skills development) but provides (and, crucially, tests) a creative, non-didactic mode of engaging young learners with 3D research data. Project activities will build on ongoing collaboration with a selection of schools and teachers in order to define the areas of most relevance and educational need. The project outputs are intended to not only fulfil a defined need in education (that is, the creation of 3D immersive learning environments that meaningfully and appropriately engage young learners) but to inspire further learning activities in creative response to the research findings being communicated. REVISIT Learning has a number of major outcomes, with strong implications for pedagogy, cultural interpretation, and creative engagement. The learning tools will not only extend the value and learning opportunities of the original AHRC-funded research to a brand new audience, they will do so in a way that is directly relevant to, and satisfies a clearly expressed need from, the schools. The 3D immersive tools provide teachers and learners with ongoing, free, public access to these learning opportunities - and, importantly, the tools will be editable so can easily be adapted to satisfy the learning outcomes of different age groups and subjects. Adding creative learning activities also allows educators to themselves have a much more creative approach, offering opportunities for school-wide project-based learning and collaboration between different classes of students. The free provision of learning tools through an open, editable delivery system encourages a wide range of continuing uses and will help to embed the use of innovative 3D data-facilitated learning into educational policy and practice, and will also create impact for learners outside the school system.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 29.26K | Year: 2016

Healthcare associated infections (HAIs) caused by pathogens such as MRSA and Clostridium Difficile are a substantial problem in countries around the world, with very significant human and economic costs (Allegranzi, 2010). Global and national strategies to address these have primarily been driven by knowledge from epidemiology, microbiology, pharmacology and behavioural psychology. To date the knowledge contribution from the arts and humanities has been limited and fragmented. However recent AHRC funded multidisciplinary collaborative projects (Visinvis www.visinvis.org ; Vision On http://visionon.org ) focusing on clinical staffs conceptions and perceptions of pathogens in context, and the educational potential of more dynamic visualisations, suggest much potential for benefits such as those outlined in the related recent case study of economic impact commissioned by AHRC (Oakleigh Consulting). Although these visualisation focused projects have involved designers, artists, cleaners, microbiologists, doctors and nurses, they have also suggested that added value could be realised by coalescing a wider range of UK and international expertise from arts, humanities and related disciplines (e.g. human geography; literature; health humanities; cognitive psychology; sociology). Our review of literature and other media to date suggests that no national or international networks of this nature and scope exist. As such, we are proposing a new arts and humanities driven network called HAIVAIRN (Healthcare Associated Infection Visualisation and Ideation Network) focusing on the question: How can we better address the problem of healthcare associated infections (HAIs) through visualisation-related ideation and applications? While the networks website will provide a virtual hub for ongoing processes and outputs, interactive work will be structured around a series of workshop events which will explore and identify areas of research need and opportunity, articulating possible cross-disciplinary contributions. Each workshop event will involve 12 invited participants drawn from a range of relevant disciplines, plus members of the Network Advisory Group (NAG), and further individuals from the hosting institution. Our proposal identifies expert international and UK based speakers who will give priming presentations to inform workshop activities. The first event will focus on micro-phenomena such as pathogens, movement and the minds eye. The second will focus on macro-phenomena such as human interactions and behaviour in healthcare environments. A set of visual mappings of workshop processes and emergent themes and questions will be constructed which are likely to include conceptual, theoretical, methodological and praxis aspects. These will then inform the final workshop and symposium event which will articulate visions and pathways to proximal and distal impacts, with foci on cross-disciplinary research proposals and knowledge exchange of relevance to academia, clinical practice, education, and policy. From the basis of the three events, the final report will be produced, summarising these aspects and mapping future research and knowledge transfer work. The report will capture key processes and outputs in a format that is accessible to all interested academic, clinical and lay stakeholders. The project website will act as the key repository for network knowledge and outputs (see www.visinvis.org as exemplar). Network members will be encouraged to write joint academic papers and editorials, and publish them in journals amenable to cross-disciplinary thinking. This would span arts and humanities, science and health profession journals. Health service conferences involving infection control will also be a natural forum for sharing emergent ideas, as will design for health conferences. Such activities and outputs will ensure that the network has both national and international impacts.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 120.18K | Year: 2017

Scotland has faced longstanding economic issues with low levels of entrepreneurialism, start-ups and innovation and, due to the complex challenges faced by different regions, sectors and types of organisation, a tailored approach to policy support has been recommended. The Highlands and Islands (H&I) region faces particular innovation challenges, including the dispersed working communities and technological infrastructure of the region, which can limit opportunities in the creative economy. The crucial role of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) in supporting regional economic development has been emphasised, but as the recent Dowling Report (BIS, 2015) acknowledged whilst business and university collaborations are critically important in supporting innovation, collaborations are complex to initiate and sustain. This is particularly acute for the creative economy where it is common for workers to be self-employed and there is a preponderance of project-based temporary employment and bulimic patterns of work. The applicants prior project Design in Action (DiA) brought together academics, entrepreneurs and designers in residential innovation events called Chiasma guided by strategic design principles and enabled them to support the development of innovative products, processes and services in SMEs and micro-businesses in Scotland (http://www.designinaction.com). Chiasma provided enriching opportunities for multidisciplinary audiences to work collaboratively, co-produce knowledge and learn collectively. The DiA project highlighted the importance of developing safe spaces for knowledge exchange and promoted successful tacit knowledge exchange of skills and experience, which encouraged a sense of shared understanding and values, of reciprocity and of trust. A key finding from DiA was that the team encountered challenges in bringing together designers, academics and entrepreneurs who were often meeting for the first time, and pushing them into forming a new, risky start-up together. To ameliorate this challenge, we will engage existing networks and communities to provide a more stable starting point for any collaborations and business propositions. Working with Highlands and Islands Enterprise (HIE), Design Innovation for New Growth intends to propagate design as a strategy for business growth and innovation with new audiences in the Highlands and Islands (H&I) region. The DING team, in consultation with HIE, have identified a clear opportunity for the delivery of knowledge generated in DiA within their established XpoNorth creative industries networks (http://www.hie.co.uk/growth-sectors/creative-industries/xponorth.html).

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