Glasgow, United Kingdom
Glasgow, United Kingdom

Glasgow Caledonian University is a public university in Glasgow, Scotland. With a history traceable to 1875, the University was formally instituted in 1993 by an Act of Parliament that created Glasgow’s third university, and what would become one of Scotland’s largest universities with more than 18,000 students.GCU is regularly ranked among the UK's top 10 modern universities, and is widely regarded as one of the UK's most dynamic and innovative universities. In 2010, less than 20 years after its formation, Caledonian was ranked among the world’s top universities, the first and only modern Scottish university to achieve this global standing. In 2013, the UK's Higher Education Statistics Agency ranked Caledonian as Scotland's 2nd best university in terms of employability among graduates and 11th best in the UK. Also that year, the University was ranked 2nd in the UK for international student satisfaction.Nobel Peace Prize laureate Muhammad Yunus was installed Chancellor of the University in 2012, as the first non-British international figure to hold the office of University Chancellor in Scottish history. Pamela Gillies has been the Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University since 2006.Independent research carried out in 2012 revealed that the University contributes over £444m to Scotland’s economy each year with the quantifiable lifetime premium of a one-year class of graduates estimated at around £375m, bringing the University's total annual economic impact to around £820m in Scotland alone.The University is a member of the University Alliance, the UK league of business-oriented universities. It is also a member of the Association of Commonwealth Universities, the European University Association, Universities UK, Universities Scotland, the Florence Network, the Talloires Network, the Erasmus+ Programme, and the Santander Universities Network. Wikipedia.


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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-RISE | Phase: MSCA-RISE-2015 | Award Amount: 1.19M | Year: 2016

The project For a Better Tomorrow: Social Enterprises on the Move (FAB-MOVE) brings together researchers and practitioners in order to explore the question of how social enterprises can grow and flourish. These objectives will be achieved through a carefully crafted network of academic and non-academic partner organisations co-operating worldwide. Managers and practitioners of social enterprises often lack an easy access to the frontiers of science. FAB-MOVE will significantly improve the transfer of knowledge between academics and non-academics and thus increase the practical applicability of research findings. For an enduring sustainable impact, FAB-MOVE develops a teaching tool to educate (future) managers of social enterprises on how to set up their enterprise in a specific environment, how to combine business with a social goal, and how to develop strategies for growth and scaling-up. Currently there is a lack of knowledge about the influence of different social and economic environments on social enterprises. Local eco-systems and traditions have a decisive impact on the wellbeing, growth and potentials for scaling-up of social enterprises. FAB-MOVE focuses on the embeddedness of social enterprises and its impact on their evolution. It identifies crucial success factors for a sustainable development of these new and innovative organisations in an internationally comparative perspective. Thoroughly analysed case studies will serve as best practices by highlighting how social enterprises overcome crucial problems and manage to grow in different social areas and various regions around the world. In particular, the cases will shed light on how managers of social enterprises cooperate with stakeholders and how their environment composed of promoting actors and existing (political) structures meet their needs in order to improve social cohesion all over Europe.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EURO-3-2014 | Award Amount: 2.85M | Year: 2015

TransSOL is committed to the systematic, interdisciplinary and praxis-oriented analysis of European solidarity in times of crisis. It has three overarching objectives: (a) it will map and analyse solidarity in Europe by means of a cross-national database that comprises three surveys addressing the general population, organized civil society, and claims-making in the media; (b) it will gather systematic data on the contextual factors and engage into political and legal analyses to ascertain the influence of the socio-economic, political, and legal context on solidarity, in particular the impact of the crisis, the EUs political responses and target-groups specific public policies; and (c) it will identify and develop best practices of transnational solidarity, draft evidence-based policy recommendations, and engage proactive dissemination and communication activities. The project comprises teams from Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Poland, Switzerland and the UK, including scientists from various disciplines and civil society practitioners, thus promising to deliver interdisciplinary and comparative analyses, knowledge-transfer and evidence-based, practicable recommendations. The project will enable us to address the three topics of the call. First, TransSOL will provide the first rigorous and comprehensive analysis of transnational solidarity in Europe, its main forms, conditioning factors (e.g., individual features as gender and social class, spatial inequalities, and contextual factors), and underlying conflicts about contending norms, identities, and interests. Secondly, the project will address the impact of Europes cultural diversity and multiple identities on European solidarity by analysing public claims-making and debates within the media. And finally, we engage into a critical reflection about adequate policy responses, in particular about the potentials of social investments balancing civic virtues of solidarity with public responsibilities.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 4.19M | Year: 2014

Knee Osteoarthritis (KOA) is the most common chronic musculoskeletal disorder, currently affecting over 8 million people within the EU, for which currently no cure is available. Adverse biomechanics, affected through some of the major health issues of our time (ageing, obesity, sedentary lifestyle) lie at the heart of the disease. The research theme of the KNEEMO ITN is towards targeted and tailored interventions for KOA, and focuses on identifying the right patients for the right treatment at the right time. Research areas include anatomy, musculoskeletal modelling, prevention and early identification of patients, epidemiology, biomechanical mechanisms, and intervention studies. The KNEEMO training programme combines existing best practices from consortium members and is designed to equip researchers with skills and knowledge specific to the research field (KOA anatomy, pathology and disease mechanisms, musculoskeletal modelling, functional assessment, KOA interventions), generic research skills (epidemiology, methodology, statistics, clinimetrics, ethics), and complementary training (entrepreneurship, project management, product development, intellectual property issues). At the individual level, training will be provided through direct research project supervision and intersectoral exchange visits and secondments. At the network level, regular workshops, courses, and summer schools will be scheduled. Additionally, web-based seminars will be provided and a social media virtual learning environment will be available for continuous supervision, peer-support and expert help. Dissemination and outreach activities will also be undertaken to showcase project results and to communicate with both the scientific community and the general public to promote the importance of research and to raise public awareness of the Marie Curie Actions.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.0-1 | Award Amount: 6.42M | Year: 2013

During the last five years, within the EU FP6 Integrated Project XENOME (LSHB-CT-2006-037377), we have convincingly demonstrated in primates that a complete control of induced type 1 diabetes is routinely obtained for 6/8 months after transplantation of subcutaneous alginate macroencapsulated porcine islets xenograft without the use of any immunosuppression. In order to improve the function of pig islets, we have produced with AVANTEA a transgenic pig expressing GLP-1 at the level of the pig islets. In fact, GLP1 is not only able to (i) increase the insulin gene expression and insulin biosynthesis, but also to (ii) induce the replication of islet cells and promotes islet-cell neogenesis and (iii) protect islets cells from apoptosis. GLP-1 has already demonstrated its in vivo potential to improve insulin secretion in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes. The main objectives of this three-year project will therefore be (1) to evaluate in vitro the effect of GLP1 transgene expression in pig islets after hyperglycaemic challenge; (2) to continue to produce transgenic pigs specifically expressing GLP-1 in pig islets under insulin promoter, and (3) finally to test these modified pig islets in our well characterized pig-to-diabetic primates model in vivo. However, in order to use islets from newborn unmodified or transgenic pigs, we will also set up (4) the pig islets isolation and cell maturation technique for Neonates Pancreatic Pig Cluster cells since neonates pig islets have prolonged survival and would also render possible the use of Designed Pathogen Free (DPF) neonates pigs which will represent a key point to reach clinical studies. BIOT will be mainly involved in this part of the work which is in vitro purification, amplification of NPCCS. GCU and AVIDIN Ltd will together develop arrays and a set of molecular testing for pig cell pathogens. A pilot study for safety will be achived whether all the prerequisite are achieved within the third year.


Jiang J.-Q.,Glasgow Caledonian University
Journal of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology | Year: 2014

Ferrate(VI) ion has the formula FeO4 2-, and possesses unique properties, vs. strong oxidising potential and simultaneous generation of ferric coagulating species. For this reason, a number of studies have been carried out to investigate the preparation, characterisation and application of ferrate(VI) for water and wastewater treatment. These studies revealed that ferrate(VI) can disinfect microorganisms, partially degrade and/or oxidise organic and inorganic impurities, and remove suspended/colloidal particulate materials in a single dosing and mixing unit process. Most recently, research groups globally have reported using ferrate(VI) to treat emerging micropollutants in water purification processes. Work has not only been limited to fundamental studies but has been driven by the ideas of putting the application of ferrate(VI) into practice; the advantages of the application of ferrate(VI) over existing water and wastewater treatment methods should be shown as should other benefits to the water industry of its use. This paper thus reviews advances in the preparation and use of ferrate(VI), discusses the potential full scale application of ferrate(VI) in water purification and recommends required future research in order to implement ferrate(VI) in practice. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.


Logvinenko A.D.,Glasgow Caledonian University
International Journal of Computer Vision | Year: 2013

Colorimetry can predict which lights will look alike. Such lights are called metameric. Two lights are metameric if they have the same tri-stimulus values. Using the tri-stimulus values as Cartesian coordinates one can represent light colours as points in a 3D space (referred to as the colorimetric space). All the light colours make a tri-dimensional manifold which can be represented as a circular cone in the colorimetric space. Furthermore, colorimetry also claims that reflecting objects illuminated by the same light will look alike as soon as they reflect metameric lights. All the object colours are then represented as a closed solid inscribed in the light colour cone provided the illumination is fixed. However, as argued in this article, the reflected light metamerism does not guarantee that the reflecting objects will look identical (referred to as colour equivalence), especially when there are multiple illuminants. Moreover, colour equivalence cannot be derived from metamerism. The colour of a reflecting object under various illuminations is shown to be specified by six numbers (referred to as its six-stimulus values) that can be established by experiment. Using the six-stimulus values one can represent the colours of all the reflecting objects illuminated by various illuminants as a cone (without a vertex) through a 5D ball. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 64.83K | Year: 2016

To develop strategic tourism marketing expertise to drive new approaches to co-ordinated marketing and social media into Scottish Tourism Alliance which will transfer through their network to enhance new tourism into the Scottish Heritage sector.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 48.75K | Year: 2016

To undertake dynamic modelling of oil injected screw compressor systems, leading to improved control system design and performance optimisation across a wide range of operating environments and fluid characteristics.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: MRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 1.93M | Year: 2014

This application is driven by recent thinking about the potential for social enterprise to operate between, and in partnership with, traditional private and state sectors in addressing the societal challenge of persistent and widening health inequalities. Such inequalities are compounded by, and related to, continuing high rates of deprivation, unemployment, worklessness and financial exclusion in the poorest communities. Many parts of the UK suffer disproportionately from such challenges. Despite acknowledgement of such relationships, gaps between best and worst off continue to grow. The research proposed here seeks to develop methods aimed at discovering the extent to which social enterprise can remedy this growing disparity. Social enterprises are trading organisations with a social mission, no share ownership, and whose surpluses are directed back towards the mission. Despite a long history in many economies, little is known globally about longer-term impacts of social enterprise on health and well-being. In addressing this knowledge gap, this proposed research would be distinctive through building an original programme around the notion of social enterprise as a public health and well-being intervention. Of note, this programme would go beyond the recent focus on social enterprise simply as an alternative provider of health services; the cutting-edge thinking, here, being that, in addressing many aspects of social vulnerability, almost any social enterprise might claim to act on upstream social determinants of health. The programme proposed would build on three main pillars: theory building and creating conceptual frameworks for evaluating social enterprise in health and well-being terms; applying such frameworks in empirical studies, particularly those of a longitudinal mixed-method nature, embodying quantitative and qualitative methods, permitting as rigorous an attribution of outcomes to interventions as possible; and addressing issues of generalisability through collaboration with a wide range of the social enterprise sector and creation of a Knowledge Exchange Forum to address relevance across throughout Scotland the rest of the UK.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-EF-ST | Phase: MSCA-IF-2014-EF | Award Amount: 183.45K | Year: 2015

Since the advent of the water framework directive (WFD), integrated pollution abatement and river water quality improvement has become a major focus in the management of water resources. At the same time, improving analytical capabilities and ecotoxicological understanding highlighted, somewhat counter-intuitively, new threats to water quality. Micropollutants in the form of pharmaceutical residues (PR) are one such emerging threat, and have been included in the most recent list of related WFD priority and related watch-list substances. This research project will address this threat by application of a combination of existing and novel techniques: 1) investigate the efficacy of anaerobic digestion (AD) for the removal of these PRs not only in conventional treatment of sludges, but also on 2) the novel application of AD to the direct treatment of point source waste waters waste waters rich in these pollutants (e.g. hospital or industry), including feasibility studies on the transfer of membrane-bioreactor technologies from aerobic to anaerobic treatment. Furthermore, 3) the project will combine PR removal by AD with biological nutrient removal (nitrogen) by micro-algae cultivation, thus addressing one of the drawbacks of AD: the lack of nitrogen removal. A particular inter-disciplinary perspective of this project is the inter-relation between 3 aspects of investigation: pollutant removal by AD, resultant ecotoxicological effects on algae and subsequently the recovery of nutrients by algae. The final aim of the project is to elaborate the scope for river water improvement by these techniques, thus contributing to the European aims of water protection and resource efficiency. This element in particular will be supported by close collaboration with a German public water company, a UK SME from the water industry, and a French University, thus increasing the projects potential for impact and uptake due to generation of realistic and industry relevant outputs.

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