Glades Crop Care Inc.

Jupiter, FL, United States

Glades Crop Care Inc.

Jupiter, FL, United States
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Adkins S.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Webster C.G.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Mellinger H.C.,Glades Crop Care Inc. | Frantz G.,Glades Crop Care Inc. | And 4 more authors.
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2015

A unique strain of Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV), which has undergone genome reassortment with, and contains the medium RNA segment of, Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) emerged in solanaceous vegetables in south Florida in late 2009. A typical (non-reassorted) strain of TCSV was reported from tomato in this same area in 2012. Identification of GRSV and TCSV in Florida extends the known distributions of these viruses beyond South America and South Africa. GRSV and TCSV are relatives of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), the original member of the Tospovirus genus of plant viruses. TSWV remains a serious economic limitation to the production of tomatoes, peppers and peanuts in the southeastern US more than 20 years after its appearance. Although TSWV is well-known to Florida tomato producers, scouts, extension personnel and scientists, GRSV and TCSV were relatively unknown until their recent detection in the US.


Webster C.G.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | Frantz G.,Glades Crop Care Inc. | Reitz S.R.,Oregon State University | Funderburk J.E.,University of North Florida | And 8 more authors.
Phytopathology | Year: 2015

Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) and Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) are two emerging tospoviruses in Florida. In a survey of the southeastern United States, GRSV and TCSV were frequently detected in solanaceous crops and weeds with tospovirus-like symptoms in south Florida, and occurred sympatrically with Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in tomato and pepper in south Florida. TSWV was the only tospovirus detected in other survey locations, with the exceptions of GRSV from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) in South Carolina and New York, both of which are first reports. Impatiens (Impatiens walleriana) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) were the only non-solanaceous GRSV and/or TCSV hosts identified in experimental host range studies. Little genetic diversity was observed in GRSV and TCSV sequences, likely due to the recent introductions of both viruses. All GRSV isolates characterized were reassortants with the TCSV M RNA. In laboratory transmission studies, Frankliniella schultzei was a more efficient vector of GRSV than F. occidentalis. TCSV was acquired more efficiently than GRSV by F. occidentalis but upon acquisition, transmission frequencies were similar. Further spread of GRSV and TCSV in the United States is possible and detection of mixed infections highlights the opportunity for additional reassortment of tospovirus genomic RNAs.


Funderburk J.,University of North Florida | Frantz G.,Glades Crop Care Inc. | Mellinger C.,Glades Crop Care Inc. | Tyler-Julian K.,Glades Crop Care Inc. | Srivastava M.,University of North Florida
Insect Science | Year: 2016

The spread of the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), has resulted in the world-wide destabilization of established integrated pest management programs for many crops. It is hypothesized that frequent exposure to insecticides in intensive agriculture selected for resistant populations, which allowed invasive populations in the eastern USA to overcome biotic resistance from the native community of species. Research conducted in Florida to understand the role of biotic factors in limiting the abundance of the western flower thrips is reviewed. Orius spp. (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) are effective predators that suppress populations of thrips on crop and non-crop hosts in southern and northern Florida. Orius are more effective predators of the western flower thrips than the native flower thrips, F. tritici (Fitch) and F. bispinosa (Morgan). The native species are competitors of the western flower thrips. Excessive fertilization and the use of broad-spectrum insecticides in crop fields further enhances populations of the western flower thrips. Interactions with native species clearly limit the abundance of western flower thrips in Florida, but populations are abundant in fertilized crop fields where application of insecticides excludes predators and competitor species. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.


Tyler-Julian K.,University of Florida | Tyler-Julian K.,Glades Crop Care Inc | Funderburk J.,University of Florida | Mound L.,CSIRO
Florida Entomologist | Year: 2014

Two Asian species of Thripidae are reported breeding in northern Florida on kudzu (Pueraria lobata), Salpingothrips aimotofus Kudo in the shoots, and Megalurothrips distalis Karny in the flowers, the latter being a new record for North America.


Tyler-Julian K.,University of North Florida | Tyler-Julian K.,Glades Crop Care. Inc. | Funderburk J.,University of North Florida | Frantz G.,Glades Crop Care Inc. | Mellinger C.,Glades Crop Care Inc.
Environmental Entomology | Year: 2014

A push-pull strategy for managing the anthophilous Frankliniella bispinosa (Morgan) in pepper and increasing conservation biological control was evaluated. Push components of ultra-violet (UV)-reflective mulch and foliar applications of kaolin and the pull component of sunflower companion plants were evaluated in replicated field experiments in 2011 and 2012. Adult F. bispinosa rapidly colonized and reproduced in the peppers and sunflowers during early flowering, but populations declined later, as numbers of the predatory Orius insidiosus (Say) and Orius pumilio (Champion) increased in both hosts. Numbers of F. bispinosa were reduced by kaolin during early pepper flowering. Thrips numbers were increased on some of the later sample dates, apparently due to reduced predation that resulted from negative effects of kaolin and UV-reflective mulch on Orius populations. Numbers of thrips increased in peppers with companion plants during the first week of flowering each year, followed by declines in thrips numbers during the next 2 wk in 2011. There was little effect each year of the companion plants on the numbers of Orius in the pepper flowers. There was one date in 2011 and no dates in 2012 in which UV-reflective mulch or kaolin acted in concert with the presence of the companion plants to reduce thrips numbers in the main crop of pepper. Yield effects were not attributed to thrips damage. We conclude that sunflower companion plants did not act additively or synergistically with kaolin or UV-reflective mulch to reduce thrips and increase Orius populations in pepper. © 2014 Entomological Society of America.


PubMed | Glades Crop Care Inc and University of North Florida
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Insect science | Year: 2016

The spread of the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande), has resulted in the world-wide destabilization of established integrated pest management programs for many crops. It is hypothesized that frequent exposure to insecticides in intensive agriculture selected for resistant populations, which allowed invasive populations in the eastern USA to overcome biotic resistance from the native community of species. Research conducted in Florida to understand the role of biotic factors in limiting the abundance of the western flower thrips is reviewed. Orius spp. (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) are effective predators that suppress populations of thrips on crop and non-crop hosts in southern and northern Florida. Orius are more effective predators of the western flower thrips than the native flower thrips, F. tritici (Fitch) and F. bispinosa (Morgan). The native species are competitors of the western flower thrips. Excessive fertilization and the use of broad-spectrum insecticides in crop fields further enhances populations of the western flower thrips. Interactions with native species clearly limit the abundance of western flower thrips in Florida, but populations are abundant in fertilized crop fields where application of insecticides excludes predators and competitor species.

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