Giner Electrochemical Systems

Newton, MA, United States

Giner Electrochemical Systems

Newton, MA, United States
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Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 999.05K | Year: 2010

U.S. automakers have invested significant resources in the research and development of hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles. However, to enable their widespread use, an additional major investment will be required to construct an infrastructure for hydrogen production and delivery to fueling stations. In order to facilitate this transition, the DOE has recommended that high-pressure hydrogen generation for home refueling of fuel-cell vehicles be implemented as an intermediary approach. The proposed design concept will demonstrate a stationary cost-effective method for the generation of high-pressure hydrogen by means of


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2012

ABSTRACT: The Air Force has a need for a robust, portable hydrogen generator for the refueling of metal hydride hydrogen fuel canisters used in portable electrical power systems. Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC (GES) has developed a simplified, static-vapor-feed electrolyzer for energy storage and life-support oxygen generation in NASA applications. This system eliminates or greatly reduces in size much of the ancillary equipment that is used in traditional direct liquid-feed systems. These include large deionizing beds, recirculating pumps, phase separators, and driers. Reducing or eliminating these subsystems greatly reduces the size of the system while increasing robustness. This technology will be used in this Phase I program to build an electrolyzer sized for this application (9 g/h hydrogen at 500 psig). Qualification of the product hydrogen will be used to size post-electrolysis driers and/or polishers that may be necessary and a system prototype will be designed for Phase II. BENEFIT: Successful completion of the Phase I program will result in a static vapor phase electrolyzer with greatly simplified ancillary devices. These advantages are currently being sought by NASA to simplify electrolysis systems used in aerospace applications. Giner is the world"s largest supplier of laboratory electrolyzers for hydrogen generation, using traditional liquid-fed electrolysis. Utilization of this technology could greatly enhance the simplicity and reliability of these devices.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.88K | Year: 2012

Development of a regenerative fuel cell/electrolyzer is proposed. GES will size two of their advanced technologies; a high-pressure electrolyzer that can directly fill hydrogen and oxygen storage vessels up to 3000 psi; and a dead-ended fuel cell that can use these gases directly and remove the product water without recirculating the feed gases. Combined these two technologies lead to a great system simplification over traditional regenerative fuel cell systems. Performance of the dead-ended fuel cell will be demonstrated at the appropriate scale and a cost/benefit analysis will be conducted to size the system components. Successful completion of this program will result in proven fuel cell and electrolyzer components at the appropriate size.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.96K | Year: 2012

ABSTRACT: As security of fossil fuel sources is diminishing, the generation of synthetic fuels may constitute a significant strategic capability for the USAF. GES and the INL propose novel catalysts and electrochemical cell components for the electroreduction of carbon dioxide to syngas. Catalyst composition will be formulated to optimize both product selectivity and cell efficiency. A preliminary design for a system yielding syngas at a hydrogen-carbon monoxide ratio of 3:1 will be produced. BENEFIT: The efficient electroreduction of carbon dioxide is a potentially critical emissions abatement technology for the future. Carbon dioxide generated from fossil fuels could be captured and utilized in the manufacture of valuable hydrocarbon products, with carbon dioxide capture-credits (or the like) playing significantly into the economics. Our engineered solutions will advance this carbon dioxide utilization technology toward an integrated jet fuel synthesis system for which there is an emerging need in the military arena.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 599.91K | Year: 2011

Development of an improved water management membrane for a static vapor feed electrolyzer that produces sub-saturated H2 and O2 is proposed. This improved membrane can increase the performance and especially the durability of static vapor feed electrolyzers. Static vapor feed electrolyzers greatly simplify electrolyzer systems as they eliminate the need for water/gas phase separation, which is particularly challenging in a zero gravity environment. Maintaining water in the vapor phase greatly reduces membrane swelling which should increase durability. Finally, by keeping water in the vapor phase the MEA is not exposed to ion and other contaminants that are carried by a liquid water stream, further increasing durability and simplifying the system by reducing the need for ultra-pure water.The primary goal of this Phase II program then is to demonstrate the enhanced performance and durability of a static vapor feed electrolyzer utilizing an improved water management membrane.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 599.88K | Year: 2010

This Small Business Innovation Research Phase II project is directed toward development of a novel microfiltration filter that has distinctively narrow pore size distribution, low flow resistance, low pressure drop and simple regeneration process. The regeneration process, which requires minimal material and energy consumption, can be completely automated and the filtration performance can be restored within a very short period of time. The overall system filtration efficiency is targeted towards the HEPA standards, where the HEPA filters cannot be regenerated effectively.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 599.94K | Year: 2010

Development of a static vapor feed electrolyzer utilizing an advanced bipolar plate that produces sub-saturated H2 and O2 is proposed. This novel bipolar design can greatly simplify electrolyzer systems, as it eliminates the need for water/gas phase separation, which is particularly challenging in a zero gravity environment. Maintaining water in the vapor phase greatly reduces membrane swelling which should increase durability. Finally, by keeping water in the vapor phase the MEA is not exposed to ion and other contaminants that are carried by a liquid water stream, further increasing durability and simplifying the system by reducing the need for ultra-pure water. The primary goal of this Phase I program is to demonstrate a high-pressure (1000 psi) static vapor feed electrolyzer and demonstrate that the system can operate without purge of the water feed stream for up to 100 hours.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 599.92K | Year: 2011

Giner Electrochemical Systems (GES) proposes to develop a cathode liquid feed, proton-exchange membrane electrolyzer stack and system capable of producing 3,600 psi oxygen. We propose to subcontract Hamilton-Sundstrand Human Space Systems (H-S) to share unique state-of-the-art technologies that provide the best path to meeting program objectives. GES will share their data and expertise with high balanced pressure electrolyzers and H-S will contribute their data and expertise in high differential pressure electrolyzer systems. Based on the high pressure anode design concept developed in Phase I, GES will further develop the electrolyzer cell and stack design. In parallel, H-S will develop the key subsystem and control components for a brassboard balance of plant. The program will culminate in the fabrication, assembly, and demonstration of a brassboard high oxygen pressure generation system.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 742.40K | Year: 2011

The US Navy requires advanced power systems for emerging autonomous underwater vehicle platforms, and hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells have been identified as a suitable replacement for the costly and hazardous primary lithium batteries currently in use. Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC (GES) and Purdue have teamed to demonstrate a novel chemical hydride fueling solution that will enable onboard hydrogen generation at high energy density. The Phase II program will further develop pellet geometry and coating technology, and foam-based hydrogen generation catalysts for use in a fixed-bed reactor. The project will culminate in a fully engineered hydrogen generation system prototype producing 25 SLPM hydrogen, suitable for a 2.5-kWe H2/O2 fuel cell. In the option periods, GES and Purdue will perform extended evaluation and chemical process modeling of the prototype, and also develop and integrate a dead-ended fuel cell with the system.


Patent
Giner Electrochemical Systems | Date: 2013-08-23

An electrochemical device and methods of using the same. In one embodiment, the electrochemical device may be used as a fuel cell and/or as an electrolyzer and includes a membrane electrode assembly (MEA), an anodic gas diffusion medium in contact with the anode of the MEA, a cathodic gas diffusion medium in contact with the cathode, a first bipolar plate in contact with the anodic gas diffusion medium, and a second bipolar plate in contact with the cathodic gas diffusion medium. Each of the bipolar plates includes an electrically-conductive, chemically-inert, non-porous, liquid-permeable, substantially gas-impermeable membrane in contact with its respective gas diffusion medium, as well as a fluid chamber and a non-porous an electrically-conductive plate.

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