Gimhae College

Kimhae, South Korea

Gimhae College

Kimhae, South Korea
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Jung D.-E.,Daegu University | Moon D.-C.,Gimhae College
Journal of Physical Therapy Science | Year: 2015

[Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the initial effect of local vibration on the stability of the shoulder joints by applying local vibration to the shoulder joints. [Subjects and Methods] For the test, the subjects held a FlexBar with one hand, at about 10 cm from one end, and performed the oscillation movement with the shoulder at 90° flexion and the elbow in the full-extension position in scaption; the vibration stimulus was set to 5 Hz. Then, the subjects underwent the Upper Quarter Y Balance Test to evaluate the stability of the shoulder joints. [Results] The moving distances in the left, right, and upper directions after the oscillation movement were increased significantly compared with the results before the oscillation movement. [Conclusion] A vibration stimulus is effective as an exercise method to increase the stability of the shoulder joints. © 2015 The Society of Physical Therapy Science. Published by IPEC Inc.


[Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the ratio between the upper trapezius and the serratus anterior muscles during diverse shoulder abduction exercises applied with vibrations in order to determine the appropriate exercise methods for recovery of scapular muscle balance. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-four subjects voluntarily participated in this study. The subjects performed shoulder abduction at various shoulder joint abduction angles (90°, 120°, 150°, 180°) with oscillation movements. [Results] At 120°, all the subjects showed significant increases in the muscle activity of the serratus anterior muscle in comparison with the upper trapezius muscle. However, no significant difference was found at angles other than 120°. [Conclusion] To selectively strengthen the serratus anterior, applying vibration stimuli at the 120° shoulder abduction position is considered to be appropriate. © 2015 The Society of Physical Therapy Science. Published by IPEC Inc.


[Purpose] The present study compared the muscle activity of the upper trapezius with those of the serratus anterior and the lower trapezius when slings, unstable surfaces, were laterally vibrated, to examine the effects of vibration during sling exercises on shoulder stabilization muscles. [Methods] The subjects performed push-up exercises on a sling and maintained isometric contraction in the final stage, while vibration was manually administered to the rope of the sling during the isometric-contraction stage. Vibration within a range of 10 cm was delivered for five seconds at a frequency of 1 Hz in time with a metronome. Vibrations were applied for five seconds at 3 Hz and 3.5 Hz, respectively. [Results] The serratus anterior showed a significant differences between isometric contraction with vibration of 3 Hz and isometric contraction with vibration of 3.5 Hz. [Conclusion] The upper trapezius and the lower trapezius showed prominent changes in muscle activity at 3.5 Hz, and the serratus anterior showed prominent changes in muscle activity at 3 Hz and 3.5 Hz. Therefore, as vibration frequency increased, making the load-bearing surface more unstable, the recruitment of the upper trapezius, the lower trapezius, and the serratus anterior increased. To perform exercises that selectively strengthen the serratus anterior, the exercises should be performed at a vibration frequency of 3 Hz. © 2013 The Society of Physical Therapy Science.


Lee S.-K.,Gimhae College
Journal of Physical Therapy Science | Year: 2013

[Purpose] The present study examined the activity and the gait characteristics of the gluteus medius and the trunk stability muscles during the stance phase of gait on level ground when a vertical load corresponding to 0%, 1%, or 2% of body weight was placed on the lower extremities during the swing phase of the gait. [Methods] The subjects were 40 young males aged between 21 and 30 years. The vertical load, corresponding to 0%, 1%, 2% of weight, which was measured with an electronic scale, was placed bilaterally 3 cm above from the upper part of the lateral malleous. Electrodes were symmetrically attached to the gluteus medius, erector spinae, external oblique, and internal oblique muscles. [Results] There were significant differences in the activities of the left gluteus medius, bilateral external oblique, and right internal oblique muscles among the vertical loads of 0%, 1%, and 2% during gait. [Conclusion] Increases in vertical load were accompanied by changes in the activities of the internal and external oblique abdominal muscles to ensure the stability of the trunk under the different loads. Gait was only possible with the activity of the gluteus medius muscle and the trunk muscles resisting the different vertical loads rather than activating other muscles of the lower extremities in terms of energy efficiency. © 2013 The Society of Physical Therapy Science.


[Purpose] This study investigated the effects of progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training on the asymmetry of diaphragm thickness in stroke patients. [Subjects] Twenty-one stroke patients were assigned to one of three groups: progressive load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training (n = 8), fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training (n = 6), and controls (n = 7). [Methods] The progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training participants undertook an exercise program for 20 minutes, three times weekly, for 6 weeks. After each session, diaphragm thickness was measured using ultrasonography. The diaphragm asymmetry ratio and diaphragm thickening ratio were standardized using a formula. [Results] After intervention, the diaphragm asymmetry ratio significantly differed among the three groups, and the diaphragm asymmetry ratio significantly increased in the control group. A significant increase was identified in the diaphragm thickening ratio within the progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training groups. [Conclusion] Progressive load and fixed load high-intensity inspiratory muscle training decreased the asymmetry of diaphragm thickness in stroke patients; this effect, in turn, increased the diaphragm thickening ratio in stroke patients. The two interventions examined here should be selectively applied to individuals in the clinical field. © 2015 The Society of Physical Therapy Science.


Jung J.-H.,Gimhae College | Kim N.-S.,Catholic University of Korea
Journal of Physical Therapy Science | Year: 2016

[Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were collected from the right-side diaphragm, external intercostal, and sternocleidomastoid, and pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1 s, forced vital capacity, and their ratio; peak expiratory flow; and maximal inspiratory pressure) were measured. [Results] Comparison of the relative activity of the diaphragm showed significant differences between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, significant differences were found in sternocleidomastoid relative activity between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. [Conclusion] During inspiratory muscle training in the clinic, the patients were assisted (verbally or through feedback) by therapists to avoid overactivation of their accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid). This study recommends that inspiratory muscle training be performed at an accurate and appropriate intensity through the practice of proper deep breathing. © 2016 The Society of Physical Therapy Science.


Jung J.-H.,Gimhae College | Moon D.-C.,Gimhae College
Journal of Physical Therapy Science | Year: 2015

[Purpose] The aim of this study was to determine the effects of thoracic region self-mobilization on chest expansion and pulmonary function in healthy adults. [Subjects] Nineteen healthy adults were randomly allocated to either an intervention group (n = 8) or a control group (n = 11). [Methods] Subjects in the intervention group performed self-mobilization of the thoracic region 3 times per week for 6 weeks (18 sessions). The outcome measures included chest expansion when breathing, pulmonary function, and predicted pulmonary function. [Results] There was a significant difference in chest expansion between the intervention group and the control group. However, there was no significant difference in pulmonary function between the intervention group and the control group. [Conclusion] Thoracic region self-mobilization may be beneficial for increasing chest expansion in healthy adults. © 2015 The Society of Physical Therapy Science. Published by IPEC Inc.


Kim M.K.,Gimhae College | Jung S.B.,Gimhae College | Kim J.-S.,Kosin University | Roh M.S.,Dong - A University | And 3 more authors.
Virchows Archiv | Year: 2014

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that exert a critical influence on tumorigenesis through post-transcriptional modification and are considered to be potential biomarkers for the diagnosis or prognosis of various cancers. Although several miRNAs have been proposed as relevant biomarkers for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), detailed working mechanisms and validated prognostic significance of these miRNAs remain controversial. In this study, we evaluated expression levels of miRNA-126 (miR-126) and miR-200c in 72 NSCLCs and 30 benign lung tissues by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and analyzed the correlation of miRNA expression with a variety of clinicopathological factors and patient survival. Compared with the benign control group, miR-126 expression was significantly downregulated in NSCLCs (p < 0.001), while miR-200c expression was significantly upregulated in NSCLCs (p < 0.001). The expression of miR-126 was significantly higher in NSCLCs with a tumor size of ≤3 cm than in those with a tumor size of >3 cm (p = 0.026). There were no other significant associations between miRNA expression and clinicopathological features. In univariate survival analysis for all NSCLC patients, high miR-200c expression (p = 0.037), large tumor size (p = 0.026), and lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.012) were significantly correlated with worse overall survival. High miR-126 expression was significantly associated with favorable prognosis only in patients with adenocarcinoma (p = 0.033). In multivariate analysis, miR-200c and tumor size remained as independent prognostic factors. Our results suggest that miR-126 might play tumor-suppressive and miR-200c an oncogenic role, and these miR’s are potential prognostic biomarkers for NSCLC. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Lee H.W.,Sungkyunkwan University | Lee E.H.,Sungkyunkwan University | Kim S.-H.,Sungkyunkwan University | Roh M.S.,Dong - A University | And 2 more authors.
Virchows Archiv | Year: 2013

Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is a molecular chaperone which plays an important role in cellular protection against various stressful stimuli and in the regulation of cellular growth and apoptosis. This study was conducted in gastric carcinoma (GC) to assess correlations of HSP70 expression with clinicopathological parameters and overall survival (OS). Tissue microarray blocks were constructed from 172 GCs and immunohistochemically stained for HSP70. Low HSP70 expression was found in 122 GCs (71 %), whereas 50 (29 %) had high expression. HSP70 expression was higher in tumours in the cardia (p = 0.008), with non-signet ring cell histology (p < 0.001), of intestinal type (p = 0.045) and of higher pathological T stage (p = 0.026). When considering the cohort as a whole, HSP70 expression did not correlate with OS (p = 0.092). In intestinal type carcinomas, however, high HSP70 expression significantly correlated with worse OS (p = 0.034). These results suggest that HSP70 expression might be an unfavourable prognostic factor in patients with GC, especially of intestinal type. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


PubMed | Gimhae College and Catholic University of Korea
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of physical therapy science | Year: 2016

[Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of different intensities of inspiratory muscle training on the relative respiratory muscle activity in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy male volunteers were instructed to perform inspiratory muscle training (0%, 40%, 60%, and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure) on the basis of their individual intensities. The inspiratory muscle training was performed in random order of intensities. Surface electromyography data were collected from the right-side diaphragm, external intercostal, and sternocleidomastoid, and pulmonary functions (forced expiratory volume in 1s, forced vital capacity, and their ratio; peak expiratory flow; and maximal inspiratory pressure) were measured. [Results] Comparison of the relative activity of the diaphragm showed significant differences between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. Furthermore, significant differences were found in sternocleidomastoid relative activity between the 60% and 80% maximal inspiratory pressure intensities and baseline during inspiratory muscle training. [Conclusion] During inspiratory muscle training in the clinic, the patients were assisted (verbally or through feedback) by therapists to avoid overactivation of their accessory muscles (sternocleidomastoid). This study recommends that inspiratory muscle training be performed at an accurate and appropriate intensity through the practice of proper deep breathing.

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