Gent, Belgium
Gent, Belgium

Ghent University is a highly ranked Dutch-speaking public university located in Ghent, Belgium. It is one of the larger Flemish universities, consisting of 41,000 students and 9,000 staff members. The current rector is Anne De Paepe . As of 2014, Ghent University ranks as 90th globally according to Times Higher Education, 129th according to QS World University Rankings and 70th according to the Academic Ranking of World Universities. It is therefore considered to be a top university, globally.It was established in 1817 by King William I of the Netherlands. After the Belgian revolution of 1830, it was administered by the newly formed Belgian state. French became the academic language until 1930, when Ghent University became the first Dutch-speaking university in Belgium. In 1991, the university was granted major autonomy and changed its name from State University of Ghent to its current name. Wikipedia.


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Patent
Ghent University and Imec | Date: 2016-11-22

A sensor for sensing a substance such as for example glucose. The sensor is implantable in the body of a living creature. The sensor has a photonic integrated circuit, e.g. silicon-photonics integrated circuit, for spectrally processing radiation interacting with the sample. A continuous monitoring system can also include such a sensor.


Patent
Vib Vzw, Ghent University, French National Center for Scientific Research, Montpellier University, Montpellier University Hospital Center and University of Osnabrück | Date: 2016-09-28

This disclosure relates to a modified -helical bundle cytokine, with reduced activity via an -helical bundle cytokine receptor, wherein the -helical bundle cytokine is specifically delivered to target cells. Preferably, the -helical bundle cytokine is a mutant, more preferably it is a mutant interferon, with low affinity to the interferon receptor, wherein the mutant interferon is specifically delivered to target cells. The targeting is realized by fusion of the modified -helical bundle cytokine to a targeting moiety, preferably an antibody. This disclosure relates further to the use of such targeted modified -helical bundle cytokine to treat diseases. A preferred embodiment is the use of a targeted mutant interferon, to treat diseases, preferably viral diseases and tumors.


Patent
Ghent University | Date: 2015-03-24

Provided herein is a radiotherapy breast board and couch for use in radiotherapy treatment of breast cancer patients, which are particularly suitable for treating the patient to the breast/thoracic wall and regional lymph nodes in prone position. The radiotherapy breast board and couch comprises a caudal part for supporting the lower body of the patient and a cranial part with supports for the head and non-treated parts of the upper body. The board or couch further provides an opening allowing for the affected breast of the patient to pass through and an opening allowing for the regional lymph nodes to pass trough as said patient lies in a prone position on said board or couch. This opening allows the use of a variety of beam directions to reach the affected region via short radiological path lengths without passing elements of the breast board or couch.


Patent
Ghent University | Date: 2016-11-29

A method for debugging and a method for testing a circuit design on a programmable logic device is disclosed, making use of a parameterized configuration. A corresponding system also is disclosed.


Patent
Ghent University and Imec | Date: 2015-04-23

An integrated waveguide based spectrometer is described. The spectrometer comprises a sensing region for receiving multi-wavelength radiation for irradiating a sample in the sensing region, a wavelength demultiplexing element arranged for capturing said multi-wavelength radiation after interaction with the sample and for providing a number of wavelength demultiplexed radiation outputs or a number of different groups of wavelength demultiplexed radiation outputs, an integrated modulator for differently modulating the different demultiplexed radiation outputs or different groups of demultiplexed radiation outputs, and a multiplexer element for multiplexing the differently modulated demultiplexed radiation outputs or the differently grouped demultiplexed radiation outputs.


Patent
Ghent University | Date: 2016-10-26

A device and method for generating electric energy/power from a wave motion. The device comprises an input branch connected to a movable element, a secondary branch connected to a main electric generator, a power split transmission comprising a first mechanical port connected to the input branch, and a second mechanical port connected to a secondary branch, and a third port being a mechanical or electrical control port. The device further comprises a variable speed auxiliary electrical machine connected to the control port for mechanically or electrically controlling power distribution in the power split transmission. The device further comprises a control unit adapted for controlling the variable speed auxiliary electrical machine in such a way as to realize a one-way rotation of the main electric generator.


Patent
Vib Vzw, Ghent University, The United States Of America and Dartmouth College | Date: 2017-02-01

The present invention relates to single domain antibodies that are directed against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). More specifically, it relates to single domain antibodies that bind to the prefusion form of the fusion (F) protein of RSV. The invention relates further to the use of these single domain antibodies for prevention and/or treatment of RSV infections, and to pharmaceutical compositions comprising these single domain antibodies.


Patent
Ghent University | Date: 2017-01-18

The present invention relates to the field of molecular pathology (for example cancer diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and/or therapy prediction) through the detection of RNA, mutations, copy number changes and determination of the methylation status of specific sequences of the genome of individual patients in hybridization assays (southern blot, ISH, dot blot) including in situ determination of the methylation status of specific sequences of the genome of individual patients in individual cells. More specifically the present invention relates to: a) target-specific probes covalently-attached to a labeled tail, b) the synthesis method of said probe, c) the usage of said probe such as an in situ hybridization-based method to correlate the methylation status of a promoter region of a gene in a biopsy or cytology specimen of a patient to the morphology and localization in that specimen, and d) kits comprising said target-specific probes. The latter method and products allow detection of (epi) genetic changes in specific cell types of histological or cytological (cancer) specimens or on membranes which will contribute to scientific research and which will help physicians to accurately diagnose diseases and/or start an appropriate treatment.


Patent
Ghent University and Allnex Belgium S.A. | Date: 2017-01-11

The invention pertains to the technical field of urethane based materials, in particular to radiation curable urethane precursors that are cross-linkable in solid form and materials obtainable therefrom. In addition the invention pertains to methods for manufacturing these precursors and materials, and their uses. The invention is advantageous to the fields of i.e. coatings and biomedical applications.


Patent
Koninklijke KPN N.V., Iminds and Ghent University | Date: 2017-01-25

A method of provisioning a service in a communication network is described, in which the service comprises at least one virtual network function and at least one virtual network path, which at least one virtual network function and at least one virtual network path are to be implemented in the communication network. The method comprises:- obtaining (202) affinity constraints and/or anti-affinity constraints relating to mapping the at least one virtual network path onto the communication network,- optionally obtaining (202) affinity constraints and/or anti-affinity constraints relating to mapping the at least one virtual network function onto the communication network, and- mapping (203) the at least one virtual network function and at least one virtual network path onto the communication network subject to said constraints.


Vanholder R.,Ghent University
Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology | Year: 2013

Crush syndrome is the second most common cause of death after earthquakes (the first most common is direct trauma). Many logistic problems with the treatment of patients with crush syndrome are due to chaotic disaster circumstances; consequently, medical and logistic recommendations on the treatment of crush victims are needed. In a joint initiative of the Renal Disaster Relief Task Force of the International Society of Nephrology and European Renal Best Practice, a work group of nephrologists, intensivists, surgeons, and logisticians with disaster experience or experts in guideline preparation collaborated to provide comprehensive information and recommendations on the management of crush casualties considering their occurrence with "epidemic" dimensions after mass disasters. The result is the monograph "Recommendations for the Management of Crush Victims inMass Disasters", which may help provide effective health care to disaster victims with renal problems. This article discussesmedical and logistic principles of the treatment of crush victims, both at the disaster field and on admission to hospitals, and guidance is described. The importance of early fluid administration even before extrication of the victims and avoidance of potassium-containing solutions during the treatment of crush victims is underlined. Also, the logistic problems in treating crush casualties are emphasized. Themost important aspects of the recently published recommendations are highlighted. © 2013 by the American Society of Nephrology.


De Almeida Engler J.,French National Institute for Agricultural Research | Gheysen G.,Ghent University
Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions | Year: 2013

Plant-parasitic root-knot and cyst nematodes have acquired the ability to induce remarkable changes in host cells during the formation of feeding sites. Root-knot nematodes induce several multinucleate giant cells inside a gall whereas cyst nematodes provoke the formation of a multinucleate syncytium. Both strategies impinge on the deregulation of the cell cycle, involving a major role for endoreduplication. This review will first describe the current knowledge on the control of normal and aberrant cell cycles. Thereafter, we will focus on the role of both cell-cycle routes in the transformation process of root cells into large and highly differentiated feeding sites as induced by the phytoparasitic root-knot and cyst nematodes. © 2013 The American Phytopathological Society.


Fodor J.,Óbuda University | De Baets B.,Ghent University
Fuzzy Sets and Systems | Year: 2012

We study uninorms of which both the underlying t-norm and underlying t-conorm are strict. Such uninorms are the only candidates for being representable by an additive generator. We prove that the representability of such a uninorm depends solely on its value at a single arbitrary point in the 'remaining' open part of the unit square. More explicitly, such a uninorm turns out to be representable if and only if this single value is located strictly between the minimum and the maximum of the corresponding arguments. If this single value coincides with one of these bounds, then the value of the uninorm at any point in the 'remaining' open part is determined by the same bound. © 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V.


Lamkanfi M.,Ghent University
Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology | Year: 2012

Inflammasomes are a set of intracellular protein complexes that enable autocatalytic activation of infllammatory caspases, which drive host and immune responses by releasing cytokines and alarmins into circulation and by inducing pyroptosis, a proinflammatory cell death mode. The infllammasome type mediating these responses varies with the microbial pathogen or stress factor that poses a threat to the organism. Since the discovery that polymorphisms in infllammasome genes are linked to common autoimmune diseases and less frequent periodic fever syndromes, infllammasome signaling has been dissected at the molecular level. In this review, we present recently gained insight on the distinct infllammasome types, their activation and effector mechanisms, and their modulation by microbial virulence factors. In addition, we discuss recently gained knowledge on the role of deregulated infllammasome activity in human autoinfllammatory, autoimmune, and inflectious diseases. Copyright © 2012 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Zhang G.,China Telecom | De Leenheer M.,Ghent University | Morea A.,Alcatel - Lucent | Mukherjee B.,University of California at Davis
IEEE Communications Surveys and Tutorials | Year: 2013

Orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) is a modulation technology that has been widely adopted in many new and emerging broadband wireless and wireline communication systems. Due to its capability to transmit a high-speed data stream using multiple spectral-overlapped lower-speed subcarriers, OFDM technology offers superior advantages of high spectrum efficiency, robustness against inter-carrier and inter-symbol interference, adaptability to server channel conditions, etc. In recent years, there have been intensive studies on optical OFDM (O-OFDM) transmission technologies, and it is considered a promising technology for future ultra-high-speed optical transmission. Based on O-OFDM technology, a novel elastic optical network architecture with immense flexibility and scalability in spectrum allocation and data rate accommodation could be built to support diverse services and the rapid growth of Internet traffic in the future. In this paper, we present a comprehensive survey on OFDM-based elastic optical network technologies, including basic principles of OFDM, O-OFDM technologies, the architectures of OFDM-based elastic core optical networks, and related key enabling technologies. The main advantages and issues of OFDM-based elastic core optical networks that are under research are also discussed. © 1998-2012 IEEE.


Patent
Koninklijke KPN N.V., Ghent University and Iminds | Date: 2014-07-02

A method for an intermediary node to reduce a number of server-client sessions between a server (104) and a plurality of clients (102a, 102b, 102c) communicably connected to the server (104) over a network is disclosed. The intermediary node (106) intercepts a first request and a second request destined to the server (104) from a first client (102a; 102b; 102c) and a second client (102a; 102b; 102c). The intermediary node (106) establishes a server-client session, between the intermediary node (106) and the server (104), using the first request. If the first request overlaps in part with the second request and if a part of the second request is not overlapping with the first request, the intermediary node (106) updates the server-client session between the intermediary node (106) and the server (104) to include a part of the second request.


Patent
Koninklijke KPN N.V., Iminds and Ghent University | Date: 2015-07-22

A method for providing chunked content to a device comprising a streaming client, preferably an HTTP adaptive streaming client, is described, wherein said chunked content is defined on the basis of a manifest file comprising one or more chunk identifiers and one or more associated chunk locators for locating one or more delivery nodes configured to deliver one or more chunks identified by said chunk identifiers, and wherein said method comprises: determining whether a chunk identified by a chunk identifier in a chunk request message originating from said client can be delivered by a first delivery node, said chunk request message comprising a first network address associated with said first delivery node, preferably said first network address comprising at least part of an IP address, an URL, or an equivalent thereof; if said first delivery node cannot deliver said chunk to said client, rewriting said first network address in said chunk request message into a second network address associated with a delivery node that is capable of delivering said chunk before sending said chunk request message to said second delivery node; and, before sending a chunk response message associated with said chunk request message to said streaming client, rewriting the second network address in said response message into said first network address.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.89M | Year: 2015

Early onset neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are rather common, and affect more than 30 million children in Europe. The disorders carry a huge burden to the patients and their families and to society in general. This burden is linked to their chronic course and the absence of curative treatments. These neurodevelopmental disorders are thought to result from the disruption of normal brain development and related neurobiological mechanisms during the prenatal and early postnatal period. Recent advances in technology, infrastructure and analytic tools allow us now to identify these disruptions in brain development in the prenatal and early postnatal period, examine how this compromises the development of key social, attentional, motor and cognitive skills, and help understanding of the mechanisms that lead to neurodevelopmental disorders. This will facilitate developing new approaches to early detection, diagnosis and treatment. BRAINVIEW ETN provides a multidisciplinary and intersectoral (academia, companies, patient organizations) network environment in which cutting-edge science is combined with training young researchers in such an approach.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRAIA-1-2014-2015 | Award Amount: 9.71M | Year: 2015

AQUAEXCEL2020 aims to integrate top class European aquaculture research facilities of very diverse nature, covering all relevant scientific fields for research and innovation in aquaculture, from genetics to technology through pathology, physiology and nutrition. It will put in place a user-friendly one-stop access to high-quality services and resources from 39 installations covering both established and new aquaculture species, all types of experimental systems as well as sequencing facilities. Giving a prominent place to EU aquaculture industry research needs through a strong involvement of the European Aquaculture Technology and Innovation Platform, it will enable excellent research and sustainable innovation to both public and private sector. It will benefit from the support of the ESFRI infrastructures EMBRC (Marine Biology) and ELIXIR (Life Sciences data) and bring aquaculture research specificities to their agendas. AQUAEXCEL2020 will be a key vehicle in the improvement of aquaculture research practices to the benefit of industry through finalized research and innovation, and of excellent science through the development of highly innovative methods and approaches such as Virtual Laboratories, standardized experimental fish lines and nano-sensors. It will also benefit to society through the development of methods for sustainable aquaculture, such as the use of cleaner fish to control parasites or Integrated Multitrophic Aquaculture, and also through a better management of animal experiments for research according to the 3 Rs, Reduction (via e.g. capitalization of data and provision of stable experimental fish lines), Refinement (via a better control of experimental procedures) and Replacement (via e.g. Virtual Laboratories). As a whole, AQUAEXCEL2020 will provide a world-class platform for all types of fish culture research, from biology to technology, in all types of rearing systems, with all major EU fish species, including the most promising new species.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2008.3.3.2.1. | Award Amount: 6.33M | Year: 2009

The main goal of PROSUITE is to develop a framework methodology, operational methods and tools for the sustainability assessment of current and future technologies over their life cycle, applicable to different stages of maturity. The project will apply the methodology for four technology cases with close consultation of the stakeholders involved, which includes cases from biorefineries, nanotechnology, information technologies, and carbon storage and sequestration. PROSUITE will show (i) how to combine technology forecasting methods with life cycle approaches, and (ii) how to develop and possibly combine the economic, environmental and social sustainability dimensions in a standardized, comprehensive, and broadly accepted way. PROSUITE will create a solid research basis for technology characterization, including the identification of decisive technology features, basic engineering modules for estimations of material flows and energy use, and learning curves. For the economic assessment, methods for the assessment for economic and sectoral impacts of novel technologies will be developed and combined with background data for scenario-based life-cycle inventory modelling. For the environmental assessment, state-of-the-art environment indicators will be proposed together with targeted method development for the assessment of geographically explicit land and water use impacts, metal toxicity and outdoor nanoparticle exposure. For the social assessment, a set of quantitative and qualitative social indicators will be selected via participatory approaches, setting the standard for future assessments. The use of various multicriteria assessment methods will be explored to aggegrate across indicators. The methods developed will be part of a decision support system, which will be output as open source modular software.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: NOE | Phase: ICT-2007.3.4 | Award Amount: 5.58M | Year: 2008

Due to technology limitations, the domain of high-performance processors is experiencing a radical shift towards parallelism through on-chip multi-cores and chip customization leading to heterogeneous multi-core systems. Furthermore, the commodity market, the supercomputing market and the embedded market are increasingly sharing the same challenges, leading to convergence of the three markets.\n\nThe main challenges for the future high-performance embedded systems have been documented in the HiPEAC roadmap (http://www.HiPEAC.net/roadmap), which forms the basis of the HiPEAC strategic research agenda. \n\nThe goal of the HiPEAC Network of Excellence is (i) to join forces in Europe to collectively work on the HiPEAC strategic research agenda, (ii) to realize European excellence in computing architectures, system software and platforms to enable the development of new applications, and (iii) to allow European companies to achieve world-leading positions in computing solutions and products.\n\nIn order to reach that goal, HiPEAC (a) will stimulate mobility between partners (internships, sabbaticals, research visits, cluster meeting), (b) will coordinate and steer research in 9 research clusters: (i) Multi-core architecture, (ii) Programming models and operating systems, (iii) Adaptive compilation, (iv) Interconnects, (v) Reconfigurable computing, (vi) Design methodology and tools, (vii) Binary translation and virtualization, (viii) Simulation platform, (ix) Compilation platform, and (c) will spread excellence by running the HiPEAC conference, the ACACES summer school, the HiPEAC journal, a newsletter, a website, seminars, technical reports, workshops, and awards.\n\nThis program of activities will lead to the permanent creation of a solid and integrated virtual centre of excellence consisting of several highly visible departments, and this virtual centre of excellence will have the necessary critical mass to really make a difference for the future of computing systems i


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: KBBE-2009-2-5-03 | Award Amount: 1.18M | Year: 2009

The core relevance of transparency as a critical success factor and the need for the delivery of appropriate support by research has been emphasized in the Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) of the European Technology Platform Food for Life from where this proposal evolved. It utilizes its links with the European-wide network of more than 30 National Technology Platforms to link up with stakeholders of the food chain including industry, consumers, research, and sector representatives of different European countries. The complexities in reaching transparency are due to complexities in products and processes but also due to the dynamically changing open network organization of the food sector with its multitude of SMEs, its cultural diversity, its differences in expectations, its differences in the ability to serve transparency needs, and its lack of a consistent appropriate institutional infrastructure that could support coordinated initiatives towards higher levels of transparency throughout the food value chain. The project focus is on the analysis, documentation, and dissemination of our present knowledge (including from literature, expert knowledge, and best practice experiences) on transparency solutions and needs, their realization through chain communication schemes and the implementation environment required for the uptake of solutions and their success. The integration of the knowledge into a standardized general framework provides the basis for a GAP analysis that identifies a Strategic Research Agenda for future research that could have a major impact on the establishment of European transparency schemes.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2009-3.2-3 | Award Amount: 2.64M | Year: 2010

The QUALICOPC study aims to comprehensively evaluate primary care systems in Europe against criteria of quality, equity and costs. The study will provide an answer to the question what strong primary care systems entail and which effects strong primary care systems have on the performance of overall health care systems. The study will collect data in 32 countries in Europe by means of two surveys: one among general practitioners and another among users of patients in primary care. In addition, the study will use external data sources, such as: the System of Health Accounts (developed by Eurostat and OECD); the Health Care Quality Indicators Project (by OECD) and the PHAMEU data base (a product of a EU DG Sanco funded European project). The consortium for QUALICOPC represents all the expertise needed for this ambitious study, including links to the external data sources. The networks of the consortium members safeguard an effective dissemination of the study results to the research community, policy makers and other stakeholders in the European health sector. He dissemination strategy includes: the publication of articles in scientific and professional journals; publication of news and other project related information at the website; production of a book and policy briefs; presentations at policy meetings and conferences; and the organisation of a final conference. By its innovative design, in which different data sources are combined for comprehensive analyses, QUALICOPC will advance the state of the art in primary care research and contribute to the body of knowledge. This is both a scientific achievement and a contribution to evidence based health policy development in Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: BBI-RIA | Phase: BBI.VC3.R6 | Award Amount: 5.96M | Year: 2015

This project aims to develop new processes and solve bottlenecks in the fermentative production of biosurfactants and specialty carbohydrates. Specifically, the project targets the development of innovative fermentation processes to produce the following compounds: 1. Glycolipid biosurfactants. The project targets four distinct classes of biosurfactants, specifically rhamnolipids, sophorolipids, xylolipids and mannosylerythritol-lipids with a wide range of application fields. 2. Specialty carbohydrates. Specifically, the project targets sialylated oligosaccharides, a class of very complex Human Milk Oligosaccharides that find application as a neutraceutical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic ingredient. For both product lines, microbial producer strains will be developed through metabolic engineering. The fermentation process and down-stream processing will be developed and optimized in order to obtain an industrial process. Second generation technology based on lignocellulosic substrates will also be developed. Sufficient amounts of the new products will be produced for application testing, in order to evaluate their market potential in a wide range of application fields. The technical, economic, environmental and social sustainability of the process over the whole value chain from biomass to product application will also be assessed, with an emphasis on identifying and addressing the bottlenecks in the innovation chain. A valorisation plan will be drafted to complete the innovation process. The project consortium has all the required players to obtain the expected impact: RTOs to address the research challenges in this project, an open innovation pilot plant to optimize and scale up the new processes, three biotech SMEs and three large industries to ensure the exploitation of the project results. In addition, two user groups (one for each product line) consisting of end-user companies are involved in the project.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: ENERGY-2007-3.3-03 | Award Amount: 1.45M | Year: 2008

The overall aim of BIOREF-INTEG is to develop advanced biorefinery schemes to be integrated into existing industrial fuel producing complexes. S&T project objectives are: to make the production of biofuels more competitive, to identify and develop the optimal integrated biorefinery schemes for the production of best suited building blocks in terms of processes and bioproducts, and to identify opportunities of various biomass-based sectors to produce fuels while increasing their market competitiveness by co-producing added-value products. Sectors dealt with are: sugar/starch (bioethanol), biodiesel, pulp/paper, conventional oil refinery, power production, food industry, agrosector. The project is performed by 7 separate but strongly interrelated workpackages dealing with: mapping of existing industrial fuel complexes in Europe (reference-cases); definition most promising added-value bioproducts; knowledge import from outside the EC; integral technical, economic and ecological system assessments to select most promising market specific integrated biorefineries; technology deployment; knowledge dissemination and training, and project management. The project is co-ordinated by ECN (The Netherlands). Other participants involved: 4 SMEs (ETC, TK, VFT, Bioro), 3 industries (Greencell, Cehave, Repsol), 2 universities (Aston, UGent) and 3 RTD institutes (VTT, WUR A&F, STFI). Project duration: 24 months. Total requested EC-grant: 995 kEuro.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: NOE | Phase: ICT-2007.1.1 | Award Amount: 9.17M | Year: 2008

NEWCOM\\ is the acronym of a proposed Network of Excellence in Wireless COMmunications, submitted to Call 1 of the VII Framework Programme under the Objective ICT-2007.1.1: The Network of the Future, mainly in its target direction Ubiquitous network infrastructure and architectures. The current proposal draws inspiration, shape/form, and substantive direction from its successful predecessor, the NoE NEWCOM, which was approved and funded by the EC for 36 months starting March 1st, 2004 and ending February 28, 2007. At the same time, NEWCOM\\ aspires to inject new vision, expanded roles, ever-higher degrees of research integration, and a definitive roadmap to financial security for the long-term life of this undertaking in the European research and higher-learning space. The core concept of NEWCOM\\ is that of an NoE of medium size, greatly reduced from the initial NEWCOM Consortium, formed by keeping the most committed and performing partners, exploiting the successful integration tools that NEWCOM designed and activated, and which is created for the purpose of scientifically addressing medium/long term, complex, interdisciplinary, fundamental research problems in the field of wireless networks, focused towards identifying, posing in the right modelling perspective, and at least partially characterizing the information-communication theoretical limits. Its main objectives are: Identify a selective set of scenarios, Define suitable performance measures that take into account the wireless channel nature, Perform a detailed analysis of the main theoretical results available, Evaluate information-theoretical bounds on the achievable performance, Design and analyze transmitting/receiving algorithms and protocols in order to approach those limits, Analyze implementation aspects of the above algorithms in flexible, energy-aware user terminals, Output the major findings into an integrated simulation library, Enhance the already good cooperation level among research


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: NOE | Phase: ICT-2011.3.4 | Award Amount: 3.81M | Year: 2012

The proposed HiPEAC network of excellence is a follow-up of an existing network and wants (i) to steer and to increase the European research in computing systems; (ii) to improve the quality of the European computing systems research, and (iii) to create a visible and integrated pan-European community in computing systems. The network is structured along four programs. The membership program aims at growing the network. It will focus on the creation of a vibrant industrial membership, and it will reach out to the companies and academics in the new member states. It wants to increasingly organize events in new member states. The mobility program aims at bringing the partners and the members closer together. The mobility program supports two types of mobility: (i) exchanges of one to three months like internships, collaboration grants, mini-sabbaticals, and (ii) public networking events like computing systems weeks, sometimes collocated with other events (project meetings, conference, ...). The research coordination program aims at coordinating the joint research between the HiPEAC members. A tangible result of the research coordination is the bi-annual HiPEAC vision. It also wants to support the European low-power industry by promoting their platform ecosystem and it wants to proactively prepare the HiPEAC community for the impact of technological evolutions on computing systems (like photonics, new memory types, ...). It also runs a set of thematic workgroups on the different technical challenges and solutions from the HiPEAC roadmap. The visibility program manages all the public activities of the network such as the conference, the summer school, the website, the newsletter, the award program, the dissemination of research results, ... It wants (i) to proactively approach the specialized press, (ii) to grow the conference into a much bigger event, (iii) to make the HiPEAC institutions more attractive for top talent by creating a job portal.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: REFLECTIVE-11-2015 | Award Amount: 1.90M | Year: 2016

Traditional valorisation approaches focus on linear processes: from academia to society. In order to bring valorisation to a higher level, all relevant actors need to cooperate in an equal setting: co-creation. Co-creation transcends boundaries, but it does not happen naturally. Therefore, the ACCOMPLISSH consortium, consisting of 14 universities from 12 countries (representing all the sub disciplines in SSH), will actively involve the other partners from the so called Quadruple Helix (industry, governments and societal partners) within the project. The project has chosen an Open Innovation approach. The ACCOMPLISSH project (Accelerate co-creation by setting up a multi-actor platform for impact from Social Sciences and Humanities) will create a platform for dialogue where not only universities are involved. The dialogue platform is organised in such a way that academia, industry, governments and societal partners equally contribute in identifying barriers and enablers of co-creation. The results from both practice and the theory of co-creation form the basis of the valorisation concept and will be tested in the project in a quadruple helix setting. This concept will be tested and developed in such a way that it is transferable, scalable and customized for academia, industry, governments and societal partners in the whole of Europe. The impact profile of SSH research could be far stronger and more visible than it currently is. There are significant barriers to the valorisation of SSH research which still need to be understood in detail. In order to push the envelope within universities, we acknowledge that next to SSH researchers, the research support officers are key players in valorisation of SSH research. The project will identify all barriers and enablers of co-creation in order to develop an innovative valorisation concept, which will foster knowledge exchange within the quadruple helix and strengthens the position of SSH research.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2010.3.2.1-1 | Award Amount: 3.19M | Year: 2010

The MEMORI proposal will provide the conservation market with innovative measurement technology, improved pollution effects knowledge and evaluation and control methods for the reduction of gaseous pollutant impact on movable cultural assets, - facilitating increased and safe use of protective enclosures for cultural heritage (CH) objects located indoors in new or rebuilt buildings for collections, to satisfy demands for energy saving to mitigate climate change. MEMORI will develop a small novel portable instrument for easy combined (oxidising \ acidic impacts) environmental dosimetry in situ with adapted software and web page for results presentation and interpretation. MEMORI will do extensive laboratory and non-destructive field analysis of impact of indoor environments on a range of organic CH materials for the assessment of environmental quality for movable cultural assets, especially focusing on objects protected inside diverse types of enclosures. MEMORI will perform varied realistic experiments and studies of methods for mitigation of the pollution impact on CH objects in enclosures such as; use of absorbing media of different types; pollution barrier films; low emitting construction materials, and anoxic conditions. MEMORI seeks to achieve its goals by engagement of SMEs that combine expertise in marketing and consulting of conservation equipment with practical conservation experience for the benefit of conservators and stakeholders, supporting their effort to assure optimal conservation conditions for their collections. MEMORI also has significant participation of SMEs in its work with technological instruments development and presentation systems for the End users, and in the studies of mitigation methods for application with protective enclosures and accessories that these SMEs market. The basis for MEMORI is the scientific and technological excellence of research and innovation within a high quality consortium with high quality management.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: HEALTH-2007-4.2-3 | Award Amount: 1.22M | Year: 2008

This proposal aims to review current knowledge and issues related to the economic impact of health at work, to assemble, organise, analyse and synthesise data from national projects and surveys, and to recommend future actions for research and policy development aiming at improving health and safety at work in a changing labour market environment in the European Union in an era of ageing populations, feminised labour markets and increased incidence of Small and Medium Enterprices (SMEs). This is achieved through co-ordinated reviews, the development of common databases regarding indicators of health and safety at work in the participant countries (including the incidence of accidents and illnesses of work, the incidence of absenteeism, and early retirement due to accidents/illnesses at work,) and the associated GIS analysis capability. In addition, a pilot study aiming at designing appropriate data collection protocols is designed to explore the appropriateness of small scale surveys, using purpose-build questionnaire, to determine the preference setting of both employers and employees with regard to health and safety at work and to highlight the cost and benefits of investing in improving the health and safety at work. The above lead to a series of co-ordination meetings and workshops at which the status of health and safety at work, its repercussions for the quality of work and its effects on Europes competitiveness are reviewed and studied. A comparative EU-wide assessment of the structure and dynamics of the health and safety at work is carried out. Policy recommendations aiming at improving the health and safety at work in the context of changing labour market environment are detailed with particular reference to the ageing population, the feminisation of the labour markets and the increased incidence of SMEs.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.38M | Year: 2013

The SO2S network seeks to exploit Singlet Oxygen (1O2) as a green and benign oxidant for use in novel synthetic methodologies, crosslinking strategies, bioconjugation procedures and materials production. The chemistry described herein generates the means to both understand and influence biological systems by providing probes and reagents from analytical methods to new drugs - and to modulate materials towards optimal properties. Training in this area is highly interdisciplinary in nature requiring the joint efforts and contributions of chemists, physicists, biologists and material scientists. Ultimately our understanding and further development of singlet oxygen mediated oxidations should lead to useful applications in the fields of organic chemistry (improved routes towards natural products), medicinal chemistry (targeted delivery and novel diagnostics), physical chemistry (controlled singlet oxygen generation), and materials science (novel materials for water treatment and new arrays for improved diagnostics). The global objective of this network is to train young researchers to become skilled individuals that meet the current challenges of working in an interdisciplinary industrial environment wherein chemistry often forms the basis, but where it is utilized in a truly diverse range of applications.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2009.3.9 | Award Amount: 3.75M | Year: 2010

Actuators based on electroactive polymer (EAP) hydrogels constitute a very attractive yet poorly explored technology. EAP hydrogels can expand and contract by several times their original volume by application of a small voltage. They can be engineered to be either porous or non-porous and the pore density and distribution can also be controlled. Their inherent limitations of very low actuation speed and need to operate in an aqueous medium constitute no impediment and in fact make them particularly suitable to a host of medical applications, some of them with high economic and societal relevance.\n\nThe Heart-e-Gel project utilises a microsystem concept based on electrode activation to change the volume of EAP hydrogels designed for operation in the cardiovascular system. Given the soft and aqueous nature of these gels and considering the need to accommodate for large volume changes, integrating these materials into complete microsystems poses unique challenges in terms of heterogeneous integration.\n\nHeart-e-Gel proposes to target specific medical applications and will require modelling of the microsystem-medical interface as well as assessing the potential of different material, actuation, volume sensing, and system delivery options. Three types of systems of immediate interest in cardiovascular surgery have been selected: a generic occluder for vascular repair, a system for improving endografts/stents for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms, and an adaptable band around the pulmonary artery for patients with congenital heart diseases, or with arteriovenous fistulas.\n\nWhile carrying out the systematic study of EAP hydrogel integration into microsystems, substantial information on processing and characterisation will be gathered and will ultimately lead to a technology library that can enable microsystem designers to address an even wider range of applications.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-26-2014 | Award Amount: 3.63M | Year: 2015

Early identification of individuals at risk for CVD allows early intervention to halt or reverse the pathological process. This is the driver of Medtronic and partners to develop a mobile, low-cost, non-invasive, point-of-care screening device for CVD. Assessment of arterial stiffness by measurement of the aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) is included in the latest ESC/ESH guidelines for CVD risk prediction. Besides aPWV, early identification of arterial stenosis and cardiac contraction abnormalities can be used to improve CVD risk classification. However, no tools are available today to screen a large population at primary care on these parameters, and individuals that are considered to be at low or moderate risk are too often undiagnosed. The objective of CARDIS is to investigate and demonstrate the concept of a mobile, low-cost device based on a silicon photonics integrated laser Doppler vibrometer and validate the concept for the screening of arterial stiffness, detection of stenosis and heart failure. We will: Investigate, design and fabricate the optical subsystems and components: silicon photonics chip with integrated Ge-detectors, micro-optics, micro-optical laser bench, optical package Integrate the subsystems and build a multi-array laser interferometer system Develop a process flow scalable to high volumes for all sub-systems and their integration steps Investigate and develop the biomechanical model to translate optical signals related to skin-level vibrations into underlying CVD physiological events Validate the system in a clinical setting Photonics integration is needed to enable a device that is mobile (small size, small weight, robust (no moving parts), low cost (high volume scalable process flow) and allows fast screening (laser array). The partners commit to protect IP whenever possible, disseminate results via open access and, if target specs are met, commercially exploit and transfer the technology to create social and economic impact.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 4.06M | Year: 2013

We will provide the first-ever research training in the transdisciplinary area of Microbial Resource Management and Engineering (MRME) to develop new concepts and technologies to meet the imminent societal challenge of closing the Urban Water Cycle (UWC), the sustainable management of residual waters and the preparation and distribution of safe potable water. The network consists of 10 regional world-leading Network Partners (NP) from private and academic sectors in DK, BE, UK, PT, CH, SE, complemented by 8 associated partners. Transdisciplinary training of 13 ESR and one ER will span from (molecular) microbial ecology to environmental engineering. Each ESR develops a personal and professional development plan. Training elements include expert training through cutting-edge individualized research projects, cross-sectoral mentorships, private sector internships, and participation in Network-wide PhD schools. Schools alternate between professional and technical training. The ITN ends with a fellow-led international research symposium. A supervisory board tracks project implementation. The private sector is engaged at the highest level: 4 private partners are full NPs. The ITN will provide ESRs with transsectoral training and experience, and instill an aptitude for research valorization, to create opportunity for research careers in public and private sectors. This ITN is timely, significant, and unique, as scientific and technological advances create tremendous opportunities for MRME, training in this transdisciplinary area is essentially absent across EU, and the need for innovation in closing the UWC is pressing, as water resources dwindle, urban consumption grows, and existing infrastructure ages. The ITN will structure the European research area and strengthen ties between and within the academic and private partners across regions. Researchers will be trained at the highest level with job prospects across academic, private, and public sectors.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-2009.9.3 | Award Amount: 1.01M | Year: 2010

The OSIRIS consortium is composed of participants involving Public Authorities and RI Champions across 12 EU Members States and Associated Countries and regions with direct links to existing and future ICT European RIs (i.e. High Performance Computing, Grids, Networks, Micro/Nanoelectronics and Future Internet). OSIRIS therefore has been established with the necessary structure and elements to reach its objectives:The main aim of the OSIRIS project initiative is to provide structured information and models for decision makers (European Commission, Member States, Associated Countries) who develop cross border public-public partnerships and who establish a coordinated approach to future large scale investments in transnational European ICT RIs.The OSIRIS project and consortium will collect, structure and provide this information based on an analysis of the current coordinating organizations active in the field and relevant documents and provide an overview and qualitative model of the important subjects to be considered when setting-up and running an ICT RI including Governance, Policy, Sustainability, Operational principles,.. This qualitative model will be applied to important examples of ICT research infrastructures together with a more detailed analysis of a representative set of ICT research infrastructuresThe OSIRIS project and consortium therefore paves the way to a platform for continuous analysis and recommendations on existing and future European ICT RIs leading to: Complementary or common planning of investments and investment policies in order to obtain sustainable European ICT RIs Procedures, rules and management mechanisms for coordinated investments in large scale transnational ICT RIs in Europe


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IAPP | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-IAPP-2008 | Award Amount: 760.44K | Year: 2009

During the last 20 years a set of methods of surface survey and non-invasive sub-surface prospections have been developed to investigate complex buried archaeological sites, aiming to limit destructive intervention, such as excavation. This set includes different kinds of remote sensing, ground based geophysics, systematic recording of surface materials, GIS-based analysis and visualisation tools, geomatic and geomorphological survey. These applied technologies require high investments in instrumentation, long formation of researchers, time consuming data processing and permits for fieldwork on cultural heritage sites. Research institutions like universities cannot afford such investments while private enterprises cannot invest on human resources, and often are not allowed to test new techniques in archaeological areas. Therefore, innovation and experimentation proceed very slowly, and aspects like virtual reconstructions of the underground ancient world and dissemination of results to the public are necessarily neglected. This project aims to join resources and very different skills to tackle each possible aspect connected with non-destructive approaches to complex archaeological sites, from fieldwork, where new geophysics techniques can be tested, to data collection (with innovative trials to automation of the data acquisition process), to data processing (where the contribution of IT experts is needed to refine the available software), to interpretation and visualisation of results, where a 3D vision of sub-surface evidence, could achieve a science-based but still effective presentation. The consortium of 7 partners will organize the mutual exchange of researchers/specialists and will recruit new researchers for transfer of knowledge purposes. Thus, an open laboratory can be established, where all expertises convey, analysis and technical activities are performed, experimental techniques and new data processing tested and formation activities can be held.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: ENV.2008.1.2.1.3. | Award Amount: 1.14M | Year: 2009

This proposal puts forward plans to establish a research network of experts on noise and health in Europe. This network will establish future research directions and policy needs in Europe. The network will review the existing literature on environmental noise exposure and health focussing on the consolidation of existing state of the art knowledge and the identification of gaps in the evidence and future research needs and hypotheses to be tested. In the network we will train junior researchers in noise and health through setting up an exchange network across Europe. The network will focus on noise exposure assessment in health studies in order to build more complex analytical models of noise and health effects that take into account moderating factors including the joint effects of air pollution and noise. A specific function of the network will be to establish communication between researchers on noise and researchers on air pollution. We will improve the measurement of health outcomes relevant to noise research and strengthen the available methodologies for future research, by extending analyses on existing research taking advantage of the large EU-funded RANCH and HYENA studies and relevant national studies. We will develop novel designs for research on noise and health to provide to the EU a new strategy for the development of noise and health research in the future. We will disseminate the results to the EU, to national governments, to fellow researchers, and other stakeholders.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: NOE | Phase: ICT-2007.1.1 | Award Amount: 20.70M | Year: 2008

Future networks became a central topic with a large debate whether moving towards the new networked society will be evolutionary or disruptive. In the future networked society the physical and the digital worlds will merge based on the massive usage of wireless sensor networks. Objects will be able to identify and locate themselves and to communicate through radio interfaces. Self-organized edge networks will become more and more common. Virtualization and programmability will allow for providing different networking environments over the same infrastructure. Autonomic networking will deal with the increasing complexity of IandC systems. End-users empowerment will increase with his capacity of providing services and content, as well as connectivity support.\nThis new environment forces the scientific community to develop new principles and methods to design/dimension/control/manage future multi-technology architectures. The new paradigms raise new challenging scientific and technological problems embedded in complex policy, governance, and worldwide standards issues. Dealing with the diversity of these scientific and socio-economic challenges requires the integration of a wide range of research capacities; a role that Euro-NF will fulfil.\nIndeed, Euro-NF extends, in scope and duration, the successful Euro-NGI/FGI NoE that has integrated the required critical mass on the networks of the future and is now a major worldwide player in this area. The consortium has evolved in order to have an optimal coverage of the new scope. Euro-NF will therefore cover the integration of a wide range of European research capacities, including researchers and research and dissemination activities. As such Euro-NF will continue to develop a prominent European center of excellence in Future networks design and engineering, acting as a Collective Intelligence Think Tank, representing a major support for the European Society leading towards a European leadership in this area.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2013.6.2-8 | Award Amount: 12.42M | Year: 2013

The MIDAS project addresses fundamental environmental issues relating to the exploitation of deep-sea mineral and energy resources; specifically polymetallic sulphides, manganese nodules, cobalt-rich ferromanganese crusts, methane hydrates and the potential mining of rare earth elements. These new industries will have significant impacts on deep-sea ecosystems, in some cases extending over hundreds of thousands of square kilometres. Scientific knowledge is needed urgently to develop guidelines for industry ensuring wealth creation and Best Environmental Practice. MIDAS will assess the nature and scales of the potential impacts including 1) physical destruction of the seabed by mining, the creation of mine tailings and the potential for catastrophic slope failures from methane hydrate exploitation, 2) the potential effects of particle-laden plumes in the water column, and 3) the possible toxic chemicals that might be released by the mining process. Knowledge of the impacts will be used to address the key biological unknowns, such as connectivity between populations, impacts of the loss of biological diversity on ecosystem functioning, and how quickly the ecosystems will recover. The information derived will be used to guide recommendations for best practice, iterating with MIDAS industry partners and the wider stakeholder community to ensure that solutions are practical and cost-effective. We will engage with European and international regulatory organisations to take these recommendations forward into legislation in a timely fashion. A major element of MIDAS will be to develop methods and technologies for 1) preparing baseline assessments of biodiversity, and 2) monitoring activities remotely in the deep sea during and after exploitation (including ecosystem recovery). The MIDAS partnership represents a unique combination of scientists, industry, social scientists, legal experts, NGOs and SMEs.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-3.3-1 | Award Amount: 3.87M | Year: 2009

Objective: The ENERGY proposal addresses HEALTH-2007-3.3-1: Promoting healthy behaviour in children and adolescents. It will be specifically focussed on promoting health behaviours that contribute to prevention of overweight and obesity among children and adolescents. Strategy: The project will use a multidisciplinary analysis of determinants and intervention schemes on extrinsic and intrinsic factors determining specific nutrition and physical activity behaviours in children and adolescents in different populations and regions. This in order to develop an evidence and theory-based new scheme to prevent unnecessary weight gain among youth in transition from childhood to adolescence. The new intervention scheme will be school-based and family-involved, thus combining a key intervention setting (schools) with a key behavioural determining environment (family). This new scheme will be validated for improved capacity to encourage and sustain healthful eating and physical activity behaviours, and the results will be disseminated among key stakeholders including researchers, policy makers and the general population. Methods: In 10 work packages systematic reviews, secondary analyses of existing and accessible data sets, focus group research, survey and community-trial evaluation research among schoolchildren, parents and school staff will be conducted according to state-of-the art methodology guided by an established and approved research quality handbook. Consortium: The ENERGY project consortium spans the necessary multidisciplinary variety of experts such as public health experts, epidemiologists, nutritionists, physical activity experts, health promotion experts, paediatricians, psychologists, economists, totalling 14 partners, from 11 countries representing all regions of Europe. The consortium has ample experience in conducting and coordinating multi-centre international research as well as international dissemination to all relevant stakeholders.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-2011.3.6 | Award Amount: 5.18M | Year: 2011

The main objective of this coordinated action is to promote the commercial exploitation of OLAE (organic and large-area electronics) technology for the benefit of European industry and business and for the welfare of European countries. Through the efforts of COLAE we will be able to provide to European companies effective access to the knowledge base and technology know-how of key European OLAE research partners and their regional OLAE clusters, to high-quality training experiences and courses, to OLAE product and business idea feasibility support, to the best European manufacturing, pilot production facilities and services, to advanced OLAE innovation process and to coordinated support for better IPR landscaping and exploitation as a foundation of European driven business.The established regional OLAE clusters across Europe that have networking stakeholders from research, industry, public and other interested parties, are bought together in a pan European cooperation which will be coordinated through the COLAE project. One important task is to promote the uptake of OLAE technologies by European companies that are new to the field. To achieve this, we will enhance their awareness of the opportunities presented by OLAE and their understanding of the capability of OLAE technologies. We will assist them as they evaluate and verify opportunities and provide a coordinated support service for their needs. We will establish a programme of training, providing basic awareness as well as more advanced technology and entrepreneurship courses with a target of reaching 500 participants mainly from industry.An OLAE feasibility network will be established and verified by executing 10 selected trial cases in which new users of OLAE technology will be assisted as they examine the feasibility of using OLAE technology for particular applications. The OLAE feasibility network is an important step towards the concept of a virtual European OLAE foundry through which OLAE technologies can be developed and manufactured at pilot scale through facilities made available by COLAE clusters. The aim is to achieve a coordinated service portfolio for industry across a broad range of OLAE technologies and applications.An open innovation model will be developed for collaboration and rapid commercialization by regional clusters. The COLAE community will collect information from important future research topics by using open workshops and will bring the recommendations to the attention of the European OLAE community, the EC, Photonics21 SRA process and OE-A.The impacts of the COLAE project are the growth of OLAE R&D services in Europe, more effective product demonstration and piloting services, the improved coordination of infrastructure investments, the enlargement of the network of OLAE companies and an increase in the number and capability of OLAE technologists and designers.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SPIRE-06-2015 | Award Amount: 5.19M | Year: 2015

Out of the community created by SPIRE covering industrial and research actors throughout Europe, the EPOS project brings together 6 global process industries from 6 key relevant sectors: steel, cement, minerals, chemicals, bio-based/life science products and engineering. Together they represent 166 bn in sales with 75% of their production located in Europe. The 6 industries joined forces with 2 excellent science institutes and 4 highly R&I minded SMEs, building the EPOS consortium with Ghent University as coordinator. With the aim of reinforcing competitiveness of the EU industry, it is the ambition of the EPOS partners to gain cross-sectorial knowledge and investigate cluster opportunities using an innovative Industrial Symbiosis (IS) platform to be developed and validated during the project. The main objective is to enable cross-sectorial IS and provide a wide range of technological and organisational options for making business and operations more efficient, more cost-effective, more competitive and more sustainable across process sectors. The expected impact is clearly in line with the SPIRE roadmap - and sector associations, city councils (in the districts where EPOS is deployed), the SPIRE PPP as well as standardisation bodies are committed to participate in the EPOS transdisciplinary advisory board. The EPOS project spans 48 months and its structure builds on activities that ensure the project challenge is addressed in an optimal way, including cross-sectorial key performance indicators, sector profiles and cross-sector markets, IS toolbox development, training and validation of the (simple and single) IS management tool in 5 clusters strategically located throughout EU (i.e. France, Poland, Switzerland and UK). Entire work packages are dedicated to dissemination and to define realistic business scenarios for the exploitation of the EPOS tool and the proven, overall cost-reducing IS cluster activities, in view of a wide uptake and a broad EPOS outreach.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-08-2014 | Award Amount: 25.06M | Year: 2015

The TBVAC2020 proposal builds on the highly successful and long-standing collaborations in subsequent EC-FP5-, FP6- and FP7-funded TB vaccine and biomarker projects, but also brings in a large number of new key partners from excellent laboratories from Europe, USA, Asia, Africa and Australia, many of which are global leaders in the TB field. This was initiated by launching an open call for Expressions of Interest (EoI) prior to this application and to which interested parties could respond. In total, 115 EoIs were received and ranked by the TBVI Steering Committee using proposed H2020 evaluation criteria. This led to the prioritisation of 52 R&D approaches included in this proposal. TBVAC2020 aims to innovate and diversify the current TB vaccine and biomarker pipeline while at the same time applying portfolio management using gating and priority setting criteria to select as early as possible the most promising TB vaccine candidates, and accelerate their development. TBVAC2020 proposes to achieve this by combining creative bottom-up approaches for vaccine discovery (WP1), new preclinical models addressing clinical challenges (WP2) and identification and characterisation of correlates of protection (WP5) with a directive top-down portfolio management approach aiming to select the most promising TB vaccine candidates by their comparative evaluation using objective gating and priority setting criteria (WP6) and by supporting direct, head-to head or comparative preclinical and early clinical evaluation (WP3, WP4). This approach will both innovate and diversify the existing TB vaccine and biomarker pipeline as well as accelerate development of most promising TB vaccine candidates through early development stages. The proposed approach and involvement of many internationally leading groups in the TB vaccine and biomarker area in TBVAC2020 fully aligns with the Global TB Vaccine Partnerships (GTBVP).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: ICT-04-2015 | Award Amount: 3.48M | Year: 2016

HiPEAC is a support action that aims to structure and strengthen the European academic and industrial communities in computing systems: (i) by increasing innovation awareness and by encouraging researchers to engage in innovation activities; (ii) by professionally disseminating program achievements beyond the traditional scientific venues; (iii) by producing a vision document including recommendations on how to improve the innovation potential of H2020 projects, and (iv) by growing the computing systems community beyond 2000 active members in Europe. The HiPEAC support action is meant to be the continuation of three successful FP7 networks of excellence with the same name (HiPEAC1-3). This support action will leverage the existing community, the expertise and the set of instruments that were developed since 2004 and work on the objectives of this support action: cross-sectorial platform-building, clustering of related research projects, structuring the European academic and industrial research communities, dissemination of programme achievements, impact analysis, constituency building and roadmapping for future research and innovation agendas. The overall approach of the HiPEAC support action is that it wants to bring together all actors and stakeholders in the computing systems community in Europe - especially EU-funded projects and SMEs - in one well managed structure where they can interact, disseminate/share information, transfer knowledge/technology, exchange human resources, think about their future challenges, experiment with ideas to strengthen the community, etc. The HiPEAC support action will support its members and projects with tasks that are too difficult/complex to carry out individually: vision building, professional communication, recruitment, event management at the European level. By offering such services a burden is taken away from the projects and members. They can then focus on the content, and the impact of their efforts is amplified.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: COMPET-07-2014 | Award Amount: 3.87M | Year: 2015

The TIME SCALE project will bring closed regenerative life support system (CRLSS) to the next level by further development of the European Modular Cultivation System (EMCS). The EMCS has been successfully operated on the International Space Station (ISS) for 7 years with rotors allowing scientific research under Moon and Mars gravity exposures in addition to microgravity conditions. The EMCS modular design provides the possibility to replace the individual subsystems including the entire rotor system. The TIME SCALE project main objective is to develop an EMCS Advanced Life Support System Breadboard (EMCS ALSS BB) and demonstrate the operational capability for the ISS. The EMCS rotor baseplate will provide generic interfaces to several compartments of a CRLSS such as higher plants (crops), algae bioreactors and mouse. Scientific knowledge on whole higher plant (crop) physiology and fundamental processes under Moon and Mars gravity conditions are essential to ensure a safe and reliable food supply in future space exploration and integration of higher plants into a CRLSS. As part of the project an EMCS crop cultivation system will be developed and tested. The closed water and nutrient management research and development will include solution for challenges such as lack of thermal convection and the need of optimised technology (e.g. ion specific sensors) to monitor nutrients available for plants. Remote sensing diagnosis of plant health will be implemented using sensors and imaging techniques and Selected Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry (SIFT-MS). Knowledge and technology on nutrient and water recycling and early warning for crop suboptimal growth conditions has significant terrestrial relevance for greenhouse systems. The TIME SCALE project bring together Universities and SMEs with the state of the art knowledge and experience needed to develop the EMCS ALSS BB for ISS and has the capacity to utilise the gained knowledge and concepts for terrestrial application.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: INFRADEV-2-2015 | Award Amount: 975.52K | Year: 2015

EMBRC is a distributed infrastructure of marine biology and ecology, encompassing aquaculture and biotechnology, exploiting the latest omics, analytical and imaging technologies, and providing on site and remote scientific and technical services to the scientific community of the public and private sector. EMBRC successfully completed a preparatory phase in early in 2014 with the production of a business plan and a memorandum of understanding (MoU) signed by 9 countries. A host for its headquarters has been chosen and and an ERIC application is in preparation. Since only institutions from 5 MoU signatory countries went through the preparatory phase, the present proposal has as objectives: 1) to harmonize the access mechanism to the operational EMBRC-ERIC across all the partners, putting all the practical tools in place, including host contracts and single point online access platform, to enable EMBRC-ERIC to commence its access program; 2) to put in place practical guidelines towards the full implementation of the new European and international legislation and commitments on access and fair benefit sharing of the use of marine biological resources, thus providing clarity to future users of EMBRC-ERIC about their legal rights over obtained biological resources, and positioning itself globally as a broker between users and the supplying countries ; 3) to focus the smart specialization of the regions onto the opportunities marine biological resources offer for blue-biotech development and innovation, thus demonstrating the member states that EMBRC is a tool towards economic development of their maritime regions, and enticing them to sign the EMBRC-ERIC, and prioritize its sustained support, particularly from regions which are now underrepresented in EMBRC (Black and Baltic Seas). These activities will ensure that the beneficiary research communities can exploit the results obtained at EMBRC-ERIC facility from the start with the highest efficiency.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2008-4.0-2 | Award Amount: 11.31M | Year: 2009

The general objectives of the OCMOL project, focussed on the development of an alternative chemical route based on oxidative coupling of methane followed by oligomerization to liquids, are twofold: 1. To develop a small-scale process: process intensification via cutting-edge micro reactor technologies will enable to skip the expensive scaling up stage to provide a proof of concept of the OCMOL liquefaction route for companies to make go/ no go decisions. 2. To develop a fully integrated process, which will be self-sufficient through the re-use and the recycling of by-products at every process stages. Such an innovative route offers 4 main advantages: 1. An economic operation at capacities of 100 kT/year, which is nowadays not possible by using state of the art technologies. 2. An operation at more uniform pressure levels 3. The flexibility of product streams 4. Low if not zero CO2 emission thus contributing to face global warming. The OCMOL route to convert natural gas into liquid fuel will encompass methane oxidative coupling, methane dry reforming, membrane/PSA separation and oligomerization. Process intensification, such as the integration between methane oxidative coupling reactor, dry reforming reactor, and membranes integration will be one of the main challenges addressed to improve the energy efficiency of the whole process. A strong focus will be put on cutting-edge material science to develop effective catalysts/membranes which are of paramount importance to implement the innovative processes foreseen. Moreover, micro reactor technologies will be adopted to investigate novel reactor designs necessary to ensure the efficiency and the cost-effectiveness of the OCMOL solution.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: SST-2007-3.4-01 | Award Amount: 28.64M | Year: 2008

CIVITAS-ELAN is a large and ambitious project of great strategic importance to its project partners and funding institutions. The mayors of the cities of Ljubljana, Gent, Zagreb, Brno and Porto have agreed to a common mission statement To mobilise our citizens by developing with their support clean mobility solutions for vital cities, ensuring health and access for all. The five cities intend to cooperate on the basis of a clear set of common objectives, based on the principle of putting the citizen first. For each of the CIVITAS policy fields a common set of objectives and project goals has been agreed, and the cities have developed a programme of in total sixty-nine measures, which are described in detail, including concrete targets.The focus on citizen participation has been deeply built into the workplan, also several NGOs are part of the project consortium.The ELAN cities are representative of a growing number of dynamic, mainly medium-sized national or regional centres with strong cultural background. The planning of the project is mature with detailed timetable, resources and organisational structures. The project consortium is very experienced, some partners were involved in CIVITAS 1 and 2 from various perspectives. As requested in the call, a city from New Member States (NMS) (Ljubljana) is the project coordinator and a learning city (Brno) is also from a NMS. A further leading city (Zagreb) is from a candidate country thus bringing the CIVITAS initiative in the enlargement prospect. The workplan addresses topics of specific interest to cities in the NMS. Through CIVITAS-ELAN three new countries, Portugal, Croatia and Belgium will be put on the CIVITAS map as ELAN cities are committed to become ambassadors in their countries.As a policy-driven project, CIVITAS-ELAN will make significant contributions to major global, EU and national policy processes.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.88M | Year: 2017

In an expanding world with limited resources and increasing uncertainty, optimisation and uncertainty quantification become a necessity. Optimisation can turn a problem into a solution, thus the main focus of this ETN is to explore and develop new approaches to treat uncertainty in complex engineering systems and use novel optimisation techniques to efficiently deal with large scale problems with many objectives and uncertain quantities. It is generally recognised, in fact, that neglecting the impact of uncertainty on the design of any system or process can lead to unreliable design solutions. Common approaches that make use of safety margins to account for uncertainty in design and manufacturing are not adequate to fully capture the growing complexity of engineering systems and provide reliable and optimal solutions. Aerospace engineering is here taken as a paradigmatic area of research and development that is concerned with complex systems, or system of systems, in which optimality and reliability are of paramount importance. UTOPIAE will train the future generation of engineers and mathematicians who will be able to tackle the complexity of aerospace systems and provide greener, more affordable and safer transportation solutions.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: SGA-RIA | Phase: FETFLAGSHIP | Award Amount: 89.00M | Year: 2016

Understanding the human brain is one of the greatest scientific challenges of our time. Such an understanding can provide profound insights into our humanity, leading to fundamentally new computing technologies, and transforming the diagnosis and treatment of brain disorders. Modern ICT brings this prospect within reach. The HBP Flagship Initiative (HBP) thus proposes a unique strategy that uses ICT to integrate neuroscience data from around the world, to develop a unified multi-level understanding of the brain and diseases, and ultimately to emulate its computational capabilities. The goal is to catalyze a global collaborative effort. During the HBPs first Specific Grant Agreement (SGA1), the HBP Core Project will outline the basis for building and operating a tightly integrated Research Infrastructure, providing HBP researchers and the scientific Community with unique resources and capabilities. Partnering Projects will enable independent research groups to expand the capabilities of the HBP Platforms, in order to use them to address otherwise intractable problems in neuroscience, computing and medicine in the future. In addition, collaborations with other national, European and international initiatives will create synergies, maximizing returns on research investment. SGA1 covers the detailed steps that will be taken to move the HBP closer to achieving its ambitious Flagship Objectives.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.61M | Year: 2017

Though Big Data has become common in many domains nowadays, the challenges to develop efficient and automated mining of the ever increasing data sets by new generations of data scientists are eminent. These challenges span wide swathes of society, business and research. Astronomers with their high-tech observatories are historically at the forefront of this field, but obviously, the impact in e.g. commercial applications, security, environmental monitoring and experimental research is immense. We aim to contribute to this general discussion by training a number of young scientists in the fields of computer science and astronomy, focussing on techniques of automated learning from large quantities of data to answer fundamental questions on the evolution of properties of galaxies. While these techniques will lead to major advances in our understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies, we will also promote, in collaboration with industry, much more general applications in society, e.g. in medical imaging or remote sensing. We have put together a team of astronomers and computer scientists, from academic and private sector partners, to develop techniques to detect and classify ultra-faint galaxies and galaxy remnants in a deep survey of the Fornax cluster, and use the results to study how galaxies evolve in the dense environment of galaxy clusters. With a team of young researchers we will develop novel computer science algorithms addressing fundamental topics in galaxy formation, such as the huge dark matter fractions inferred by theory, and the lack of detected angular momentum in galaxies. The collaboration is unique - it will develop a platform for deep symbiosis of two radically different strands of approaches: purely data-driven machine learning and specialist approaches based on techniques developed in astronomy. Young scientists trained with such skills are highly demanded both in research and business.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: BBI-IA-DEMO | Phase: BBI.VC3.D5-2015 | Award Amount: 15.54M | Year: 2016

Approximately one third of all food produced globally is wasted every year throughout the whole value chain-from farmers to consumers. To extract the significant amounts of valuable compounds contained in these wastes, AgriMax will combine affordable and flexible processing technologies (ultrasound assisted and solvent extraction, filtration, thermal and enzymatic treatments) for the valorization of side streams from the horticultural culture and food processing industry to be used in a cooperative approach by local stakeholders. Through the selection of case-scenarios previously developed to a pilot scale by the participating RTOs and their industrial transfer in new applications as food additives, packaging and agricultural materials among others, the project will disclose the holistic potential of four new agro-value chains (residues and by products from the culture and processing of tomato, cereals, olives, potato). Any by-product generated along the production cycle will be valorized in a cascade manner to reach over 40% of high value use of the waste. This will lead to additional production of active ingredients in lower concentration, but also fibres, biogas and fertilizers from the left biomass (the latter with the aim of being used in closed loop in the culture of the crops used in the project to prevent soil impoverishing). An LCA and LCC will also study the best approach to minimize the environmental impact of the new value chains without jeopardizing the cost effectiveness of the operations. The pilot multi-feedstock bio-refinery processes will be validated in two demonstration sites in Spain and Italy. Societal, ethical, safety, techno-feasibility and regulatory aspects will be studied. Last but not least, a business model and platform for communication between the potential raw materials suppliers will be set up to maximize the use of the cooperative treatment plants throughout the year.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: ENV.2010.2.2.1-3 | Award Amount: 1.20M | Year: 2011

EuroMarine is a coordination action that seeks to develop and implement an agreed framework for the long-lasting and durable co-operation between research institutions that were partners in FP6 marine Networks of Excellence in order to achieve further integration of marine research in Europe. Particular areas for cooperation will be: research programming, joint development and use of data bases, training and mobility of researchers, joint programming and use of research infrastructures. The objective is to provide an agreed frame for strong institutional commitment to this durable collaboration. The ultimate aim will be the sustainable integration of marine research and a significant contribution to the structure of the ERA.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME-AG | Phase: SME-2012-2 | Award Amount: 3.06M | Year: 2012

Trend analyses indicate that the consumption of meat products in most EU countries is stagnating, with the exception of the market segment light and healthy. However, consumer perception is increasingly influenced by messages in the media that consumption of nitrite preserved meat products contributes to human cancer risk. Therefore, the aim of the PHYTOME project is to develop new meat processing technologies, resulting in innovative products that have no or strongly reduced nitrite levels and that have been shown to contribute to improved gut health. The new meat products will be enriched with carefully selected biologically active compounds, so called phytochemicals, present in various natural plant extracts. Specific phytochemicals possess antimicrobial activity that may allow replacement of nitrite without hampering microbiological safety. Phytochemicals are also known to protect the gut from the induction of genetic damage and adverse health effects. The PHYTOME project will deliver optimized food processing techniques to introduce phytochemicals into a range of meat products and that will guarantee microbiological safety and good sensory quality. These new technologies will be transferred to the other end-users to demonstrate their applicability in industrial settings. The new meat products will be evaluated in a human dietary intervention study to establish their positive effect on cancer risk markers in colonic tissues using the newest genomics techniques available. Elaborate consumer studies will show the response to the newly developed products. Both consumer acceptance and the willingness to buy this new type of products will be tested, eventually resulting in a tailored marketing strategy. The European and national SME associations have an excellent network to disseminate the results of the PHYTOME project across the entire EU meat processing sector, stimulating the exploitation of the identified growth market for light and healthy meat products.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2016 | Award Amount: 3.97M | Year: 2017

MMbio will bridge the classically separate disciplines of Chemistry and Biology by assembling leading experts from academia and non-academic partners (industry, technology transfer & science communication) to bring about systems designed to interfere therapeutically with gene expression in living cells. Expertise in nucleic acid synthesis, its molecular recognition and chemical reactivity is combined with drug delivery, cellular biology and experimental medicine. This project represents a concerted effort to make use of a basic and quantitative understanding of chemical interactions to develop and deliver oligonucleotide molecules of utility for therapy. Our chemical biology approach to this field is ambitious in its breadth and represents a unqiues opportunity to educate young scientists across sectorial and disciplinary barriers. Training will naturally encompass a wide range of skills, requiring a joint effort of chemists and biologists to introduce young researchers in a structured way to and array of research methodologies that no single research grouping could provide. The incorporation of early-stage and later stag ebiotechnology enterprises ensures that commercialisation of methodologies as well as the drug development process is covered in this ITN. We hope that MMBio will train scientists able to understand both the biological problem and the chemistry that holds the possible solution and develop original experimental approaches to stimulate European academic and commercial success in this area.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2008-2-1-01 | Award Amount: 3.21M | Year: 2009

Obesity has been estimated to cost the EU some 70 annually through health care costs and lost productivity, and additionally over-consumption of salt, sugar and saturated fats and under-consumption of fruit and vegetables cause almost 70,000 premature deaths annually in the UK alone. Member States have initiated a variety of policy interventions to encourage healthy eating including prohibitions on advertising certain foods to children, promotion of fruit and vegetable consumption, nutrition labelling, dialogue with food industry to improve food product composition and regulation of school meals and public sector canteens to ensure healthy food offerings. Rarely have these been evaluated in a systematic manner. The EATWELL project will gather benchmark data on healthy eating interventions in Member States and review existing evaluations of the effectiveness of interventions using a 3 stage procedure: 1. The impact of the intervention on consumer attitudes, consumer behaviour and diets; 2. The impact of the change in diets on obesity and health; 3. The value attached by society to these changes, measured in life years gained, cost savings and QALYs. Where evaluations have been inadequate EATWELL will gather secondary data and analyse them using models mainly from the psychology and economics disciplines. Particular attention will be paid to lessons that can be learned from the private sector that are transferable to the healthy eating campaigns in the public sector. Through consumer surveys and workshops with other stakeholders, EATWELL will assess the acceptability of the range of potential interventions. Armed with scientific quantitative evaluations of policy interventions and their acceptability to stakeholders, EATWELL will recommend most appropriate interventions for Member States and the EU, provide a one-stop guide to methods and measures in intervention evaluation, and outline data collection priorities for the future.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2008.10.1.1 | Award Amount: 5.21M | Year: 2009

Living plants in microbial fuel cells might be used as future large-scale Europe wide green energy providers. Such a system can produce in-situ 24 hours per day green electricity or biohydrogen without harvesting the plants. That this might become true was indicated by our first small scale proof of principle experiments describing the so called Plant Microbial Fuel Cell (Plant-MFC) (Strik, 2008, De Schamphelaire, 2008). The Plant-MFC aims to transform solar radiation into green electricity or biohydrogen in a clean and efficient manner. In the Plant-MFC concept, living plants and living microbes form an electrochemical system that is capable of sustainable production of green electricity or biohydrogen from solar energy. By its nature, the Plant-MFC is in potential 5 times more efficient than conventional bio-energy systems. The technology might be implemented in several ways, ranging from local small scale electricity providers to large scale energy wetlands & islands, high-tech energy & food supplying greenhouses and novel biorefineries. This way, affordable bioenergy maybe produced in Europe as well as in developing countries. Plant-MFCs can be integrated in landscapes invisibly which makes this technology socially highly acceptable. However, exploration of new areas of science & technology is necessary to overcome Plant-MFCs bottlenecks and to make this principally clean, renewable and sustainable technology come true. It is now time to show that significant independent European biofuel & bioelectricity production is possible; we propose that Plant-MFCs can be an excellent choice for our future. We expect that Plant-MFC technology can at least cover 20% of Europes primary energy need in a real clean & sustainable way. The Plant-MFC concept has several attractive qualities which can provide the significant break through for sustainable energy production in Europe. It will reinforcing competitiveness of Europe since Plant-MFC is world-wide implementable.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: SEC-2009-4.3-02 | Award Amount: 4.58M | Year: 2010

In the event of a large scale radiological emergency biological dosimetry is an essential tool that can provide timely assessment of radiation exposure to the general population and enable the identification of those exposed people, who should receive medical treatment. A number of biodosimetric tools are potentially available, but they must be adapted and tested for a large-scale emergency scenario. These methods differ in their specificity and sensitivity to radiation, the stability of signal and speed of performance. A large scale radiological emergency can take different forms. Based on the emergency scenario different biodosimetric tools should be applied so that the dosimetric information can be made available with optimal speed and precision. The aim of this multi-disciplinary collaborative project is to analyse a variety of biodosimetric tools and adapt them to different mass casualty scenarios. The following biodosimetric tools will be validated and established: the dicentric assay, the micronucleus assay, the gamma-H2AX assay, the skin speckle assay, the blood serum protein expression assay and EPR/OSL dosimetry in components of pocket electronic devises. The assays were chosen because they complement each other with respect to sensitivity, specificity to radiation and the exposure scenario as well as speed of performance. The project will involve the key European players with extensive experience in biological dosimetry. Training will be carried out and automation and commercialisation pursued. An operational guide will be developed and disseminated among emergency preparedness and radiation protection organisations. The final deliverable of this project will be establishment of a biodosimetric network that is fully functional and ready to respond in case of a mass casualty. Thus, the project will strengthen the European security capabilities by achieving tangible results.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2011.1.2-02;KBBE.2011.1.4-06 | Award Amount: 3.88M | Year: 2012

This proposal, INEMAD will concentrate on innovative strategies to reconnect livestock and crop production farming systems. New flows of energy and materials within the agricultural sector (or linked to the agricultural sector) will be analysed and will create opportunities for re-thinking the relation between crop and livestock production. Various options to cope with recycling, greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation, and bio-based economy will need an integral assessment on energy and nutrient flows and will cause new arrangements between firms, land use and land management. INEMAD will address the question of what new methods and how new arrangements should be developed to restore the recycling within the specialisation context. To realize these ambitions, the leading principle of INEMAD is a triangular enlargement of the traditional farming systems with a processing system. Processing is proposed as a third system, to be linked with crop and the livestock production, in order to increase agricultural productivity while reducing external energy input and closing nutrient cycle. Nutrient recycling can be done by biogas production and the use of digestate as fertilizer. Digestate can not only replace the manure but also chemical fertiliser because of its comparable properties. INEMAD will analyse improvements options for biogas plants, valorisation options for the digestate, improve the management by the use of optimisation models and compare organisational structures.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2008-2-2-01 | Award Amount: 3.99M | Year: 2009

Nutrition, i.e. our daily diet, is a major life style factor, greatly impacting on human health and disease. Epidemiological evidence suggests that diets rich in plant-based foods and beverages decrease the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Various phytochemical constituents, in particular a class of compounds called flavanols, have been avidly investigated in recent years. Current dietary interventions in humans using flavanol-containing foods have substantiated epidemiological data indicating various potential dietary flavanol-mediated bioactivities, including improved vascular function, decreased blood pressure, attenuated platelet clotting, and improved immune responses. Latest innovations in flavanol analytics, chemistry, food processing technology, and cardiovascular function analysis make the elucidation of underlying mechanisms of flavanol bioactivity not just possible, but also impactful with regard to dietary advice and public health. Thus, a practical application of novel findings emanating from flavanol research in terms of a science/evidence-based development represents a worthwhile endeavour. This entails development of novel food ingredients, and innovative nutrient-delivery matrices. Such novel, nutritionally responsible food formulations hold the potential to open novel avenues in the prevention and amelioration of cardiovascular diseases in Europe. FLAVIOLA aims at: (i) illuminating the cellular and sub-cellular effects of flavanols and their main human metabolites; (ii) investigating key parameters of dietary flavanol absorption, clearance and efficacy towards surrogate markers of cardiovascular function in humans; (iii) developing innovative, functional, and nutritionally responsible food matrices for optimised dietary flavanol delivery; and finally (iv) demonstrating cardiovascular benefits and safety for a newly developed prototype food product.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-SICA | Phase: HEALTH-2007-3.5-4 | Award Amount: 3.74M | Year: 2009

Besides a dramatic lack of financial and human resources in developing countries, health care is additionally endangered by quality deficiencies caused by low staff motivation. This lack of motivation leads to an insufficient translation of knowledge into optimal utilization of resources. The know-do gap represents a challenge that must be addressed to strengthen health services performance towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). This is in particular true for some sensitive sectors like pre-natal and maternal health care. General objective of this research is to improve maternal health through better pre-natal and maternal care services offered by better motivated health workers. A computer-assisted clinical decision support system (CDSS) will be developed, implemented and tested aiming at (I) quality improvement of maternal and newborn care and (II) assessment of providers performance. Based on this tool a commonly agreed incentive scheme to increase motivation will be shaped and tested in three SSA - countries, namely Burkina, Ghana, and Tanzania. The incentive scheme might contain both non-monetary and monetary incentives and will be designed according to the human resource policy in the three countries. The planned approach is an implementation study with control arms containing one hospital and 6 first line health facilities in each of the study districts and an equal number of facilities in the control arm. A set of indicators for measurement of changes in quality of delivered services will be identified in order to follow up the sustainability and effectiveness of the strategies after their implementation. The study findings will allow understanding the important factors of staff motivation and facilitate adequate management for improvement of maternal and neonatal health care. Knowing is not enough, we must apply; Wanting to do, is not enough, we must do it - J.W. v. Goethe


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: HEALTH-2009-4.3.2-2 | Award Amount: 3.89M | Year: 2010

The main aim of the proposed research is to investigate how the interplay of patent regimes, pharmaceutical regulation, availability of drug production facilities, health care infrastructure and service provision, and engagement by foreign donors influence appropriate, affordable access to medicines in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. We aim to map patterns of production, distribution, supply and consumption of medicines within seven health care areas HIV/AIDS, Malaria, Reproductive Health, Tuberculosis (TB) control, Mental Health, Pain Management and Diabetes. We also plan to investigate the strategies and influence of selected Indian producers who are active as exporters, partners in joint ventures, or as direct producers in the selected South Asian and African countries.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: INFRADEV-4-2014-2015 | Award Amount: 9.04M | Year: 2015

Marine (blue) biotechnology is the key to unlocking the huge economic potential of the unique biodiversity of marine organisms. This potential remains largely underexploited due to lack of connectivity between research services, practical and cultural difficulties in connecting science with industry, and high fragmentation of regional research, development and innovation (RDI) policies. To overcome these barriers, EMBRIC (European Marine Biological Resource Infrastructure Cluster) will link biological and social science research infrastructures (EMBRC, MIRRI, EU-OPENSCREEN, ELIXIR, AQUAEXCEL, RISIS) and will build inter-connectivity along three dimensions: science, industry and regions. The objectives of EMBRIC are to: (1) develop integrated workflows of high quality services for access to biological, analytical and data resources, and deploy common underpinning technologies and practices; (2) strengthen the connection of science with industry by engaging companies and by federating technology transfer (TT) services; (3) defragment RDI policies and involve maritime regions with the construction of EMBRIC. Acceleration of the pace of scientific discovery and innovation from marine bioresources will be achieved through: (i) establishment of multidisciplinary service-oriented technological workflows; (ii) joint development activities focusing on bioprospection for novel marine natural products, and marker-assisted selection in aquaculture; (iii) training and knowledge transfer; (iv) pilot transnational access to cluster facilities and services. EMBRIC will also connect TT officers from contrasted maritime regions to promote greater cohesion in TT practices. It will engage with policy-makers with the aim of consolidating a perennial pan-European virtual infrastructure cluster rooted in the maritime regions of Europe and underpinning the blue bioeconomy.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.4.5-1 | Award Amount: 15.66M | Year: 2010

Causes explaining the epidemic of IgE-associated (allergic) diseases are unclear. MeDALL (Mechanisms of the Development of Allergy) aims at generating novel knowledge on mechanisms of allergy initiation, in particular in childhood. To understand how a complex network of genetic and environmental factors leads to complex allergic phenotypes, a novel stepwise, large and integrative translational approach is needed. MeDALL includes experts in allergy, epidemiology, genetics, immunology, biology, animal models, biochemistry and systems biology combining strengths of ongoing EU projects. Classical phenotypes (expert-based) and novel phenotypes of allergy (hypothesis-free statistical modelling) are compared. Population-based data are collected from a cross-sectional study (Karelia) and existing birth-cohorts followed using a common protocol. IgE to foods and inhalants are tested using component-resolved diagnosis across Europe in populations. Biomarker profiles (fingerprints) are extensively assessed using epigenetics, targeted proteomics and unbiased transcriptomics in a subsample of the study population. Those associated with allergic phenotypes are validated in large study populations. Relevant fingerprints are combined into network biomarker phenotype handprints using a systems biology approach and validated in a sufficiently powered sample. Animal studies and in vitro human immunology reinforce the validation. This information coupled with classical and novel phenotypes characterize environmental protective and susceptibility factors of allergy and risk groups. Results are fitted into new integrative complex mathematical models to establish suitable biomarkers for early diagnosis, prevention and targets for therapy of allergy-associated diseases such as asthma and atopic dermatitis. Ethics and gender are considered. MeDALL aims at improving health of European citizens, Europe competitiveness and innovative capacity while addressing global health issues.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH-2007-1.2-03 | Award Amount: 1.27M | Year: 2008

The main purpose of FINESS is to get a clear understanding of the implications of ongoing financial market integration in Europe on economic growth, employment and competitiveness, to identify likely future paths of the development and to draw policy relevant conclusions. Several main breakthroughs will be achieved throughout the project. On the macroeconomic level, the role of financial systems and their transmission channels on growth will be explored by innovative and tailor made econometric techniques, taken dynamic interactions between financial, product and labour markets into account. A range of indicators to measure the degree of financial integration will be constructed, and their development in time will be addressed. Moreover, insights into the working of financial institutions will be provided for the microeconomic level. The comparative approach undertaken by FINESS is especially useful to uncover catalysts and bottlenecks in the architecture of financial systems. By investigating unique datasets, the role of the financial structure, i.e., the banking sector, markets for private equity and venture capital, for improving efficiency and sustainable expansion of start ups and established firms is studied. The impacts of different degrees of financial integration on the portfolio decisions of households are explored with simulation models. Topics specifically related to the transition period of the New Member States as well as the gender dimension in turning impulses from the financial system into efficiency and growth are covered by the project. By fulfilling its goals, FINESS will provide in-depth knowledge on the relationship between financial systems and sustainable economic growth in a changing environment.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-SoU | Phase: ENERGY.2008.8.4.1 | Award Amount: 25.19M | Year: 2010

The objective of ECO-Life project is to establish a replicable planning & implementation approach and to demonstrate innovative and integrated energy concepts in supply and demand side in municipalities in LT, BE and DK to reach the goal of zero CO2. The local ECO-life projects are integrated in large climate action initiatives in the municipalities. The project will use 100 % RES. Concerning RUE, LT is representing huge refurbishment potential in East Europe, BE focuses on social housing and DK represents the next level of energy efficiency. A Whole Town Design Approach is used in all three communities with focus on achieving goals at affordable costs and on developing new financing tools. The approach includes end-user involvement and dissemination. The DK Concerto experiences from Concerto III will be transferred to first Concerto projects in BE and LT. The project will directly impact 14,100 inhabitants. Community household impact 2600 DK, 1500 BE, 2500 LT. Zero Carbon Vision area, DK: 3000 m solar field dedicated to ECO-Life;-1.2 MW wind, >320 m PV; 40 passive dwellings 49 kWhtpe/m2 (tot. prim. energy); 2 experimental houses 49 kWhtpe/m; 200 A\dwel. 74 kWhtpe/m, 1stof large scheme;102 dwel. refurbished 100 kWhtpe/m; School/Inst, office 70 kWhtpe/m;376 kW polygeneration heat/cool with pos. ground energy storage;ICT and Smart-grid solutions; Whole District Refurbishment, LT: 2 MW bioboiler -local wood waste;200 kWel/240th CHP;500 m solar thermal;Minor use PV;360 typical East Europe dwel. refurbished - from 250 kWhtpe/m to 125 kWhtpe/m;4200 m refurbished tertiary build;Experimental Social Housing area, BE;75 kWp BIPV;163 dwel. refurbished to 32 kWhtpe/m;87 new zero energy buildings, 21 kWhtpe/m;Biofuel mini-CHP units in buildings Key innovations: Whole town design approach, including end-user involvement and dissemination;Smart metering & CEMS;New ESCO scheme;Training


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME-AG | Phase: SME-2 | Award Amount: 3.59M | Year: 2010

Mycotoxins are naturally occurring secondary metabolites produced by certain moulds/fungi as a result of their organic processes. Unfortunately, most mycotoxins are known to hazardously contaminate crops and consequently animal feeds and animal products, causing significant economic losses associated with their impact on animal and human health, animal productivity and domestic and international trade. While the economic effects are not easily calculated due to the several participants in the grain sector, European Union is setting stricter and stricter limits of mycotoxin concentrations. Deoxynivalenol also known as DON or vomitoxin is one of about 150 related compounds known as the trichothecenes that are formed by a number of species of Fusarium and some other fungi. It is nearly always formed before harvest when crops are invaded by certain species of Fusarium such as F. graminearum and F. culmorum. Our goal would be twofold: -developing a new sampling technique guaranteeing a 95% bulk transparency, -adapting a biosensor technology for the detection of deoxynivalenol. The electrochemical detection was selected as the amperometric sensor technology using a special biorecognitive layer proved to be the most reliable, low-cost method to be used in an on-site operating device. Our proposed solution will provide an easy-to-use, environmentally friendly, continuously operating system to fight against the mycotoxin infection.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: ENERGY-2007-3.3-03 | Award Amount: 1.18M | Year: 2008

An ambitious and achievable vision for 2030 is that up to 25% of the EUs transport fuel needs could be meet by clean and CO2-efficient biofuel. To achieve this, it will be necessary to promote the transition towards second generation biofuels (e.g. lignocellulosic ethanol, syngas gas based fuels, pyrolysis oil based biofuels) but also support the implementation of currently available biofuels including biodiesel via integrated production of energy and other added-value products trough biorefineries. The aim of SUSTOIL is to develop advanced biorefinery schemes to convert whole EU oil-rich crops (rapeseed, olive and sunflower) into energy (fuels, power and heat), food and bioproducts (chemicals and/or materials) making optimal uses of the side streams generated during farming/harvesting, primary processing (e.g. oil extraction and refining) and secondary processing (e.g. transesterification). This will be achieved by bringing together the appropriate skills in Europe so as to create a critical mass of expertise necessary to develop the Biorefinery scheme. SUSTOIL will integrate the expertise of a number of Project Partners with the expertise of an Advisory Board composed of experts from the EU, US and beyond. Economic, social and environmental costs benefits of optimal integrated schemes will be assessed and main technological challenges/knowledge gaps will be identified, resulting in recommendations of key activities for future collaborative projects. SUSTOIL will disseminate the results of the action via the media, a dedicated website and the internationally recognised Renewable Resources and Biorefinery conference series


Patent
Koninklijke KPN N.V., Iminds and Ghent University | Date: 2015-01-14

A method for providing chunked content to a device having a streaming client, chunked content defined on the basis of a manifest file having chunk identifiers and associated chunk locators for locating delivery nodes configured to deliver chunks identified by the chunk identifiers. Whether a chunk identified by a chunk identifier in a chunk request message originating from the client can be delivered by a first delivery node is determined, the request message including a first network address associated with the first node. If the first node cannot deliver the chunk to the client, the first address is rewritten into a second network address associated with a delivery node capable of delivering the chunk before sending the request message to the second node. Before sending a chunk response message associated with the request message to the client, the second address in the response message is rewritten into the first address.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-13-2015 | Award Amount: 6.43M | Year: 2016

MycoKey aims to generate innovative and integrated solutions that will support stakeholders in effective and sustainable mycotoxin management along food and feed chains. The project will contribute to reduce mycotoxin contamination mainly in Europe and China, where frequent and severe mycotoxin contaminations occur in crops, and where international trade of commodities and contaminated batches are increasing. MycoKey will address the major affected crops maize, wheat and barley, their associated toxigenic fungi and related mycotoxins (aflatoxins, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, ochratoxin A, fumonisins). The project will integrate key information and practical solutions for mycotoxin management into a smart ICT tool (MycoKey App), providing answers to stakeholders, who require rapid, customized forecasting, descriptive information on contamination risk/levels, decision support and practical economically-sound suggestions for intervention. Tools and methodologies will be strategically targeted for cost-effective application in the field and during storage, processing and transportation. Alternative and safe ways to use contaminated batches will be also delivered. The focus of Mycokey will be: i) innovating communications of mycotoxin management by applying ICT, providing input for legislation, enhancing knowledge and networks; ii) selecting and improving a range of tools for mycotoxin monitoring; iii) assessing the use of reliable solutions, sustainable compounds/green technologies in prevention, intervention and remediation. The multi-disciplinary consortium, composed by scientific, industrial and association partners (32), includes 11 Chinese institutions and will conduct the 4 years programme in a framework of international networks.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: LCE-03-2015 | Award Amount: 28.87M | Year: 2016

The aim is to develop and install a pre-commercial wave energy converter (WEC) of 1MW power, the WAVESTAR C6-1000 device, with main targets the device industrialization and the demonstration of wind and wave energy applications. The utility company Parkwind, which develops, builds and operates wind farms in the North Sea, is committed to the achievement of WAVESTARs next development stage. Parkwind provides the installation site with grid connection for the first full-scale WAVESTAR WEC, located within a Belgian offshore wind farm. The UPWAVE project consortium has been developed through the establishment of strong synergies and partnerships, by bringing together key European industrial players and European universities represented by wave energy experts whose overall objectives focus on: 1) Reduction of the devices cost by introducing new design, components and materials. Cost optimization is achieved through new methods on deployment, installation, operation and maintenance. 2) Improvement of the energy efficiency by developing a more advanced Power Take Off based on a second generation digital hydraulic system and innovative control strategy. 3) Integration of wave energy converters in wind farms by considering the interaction between wave and wind devices in terms of operation, cost reduction and maximization of environmental benefits. Public research programs, industrial cooperation and technology transfer from the offshore industry (offshore wind, oil and gas) ensure the development of manufacturing processes, automation and optimisation of the WAVESTAR C6-1000 WEC. New certificates and standards will be made available for the wave energy industry. After the completion of the UPWAVE project, the cost of wave energy will be significantly reduced to a level in line with the cost of offshore wind energy (around 15 c/kWh). The WAVESTAR C6-1000 demonstrator device will lead to a commercial WEC and a hybrid renewable energy device (wind and wave).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-25-2015 | Award Amount: 4.00M | Year: 2015

Computer clock speeds have not increased since 2003, creating a challenge to invent a successor to CMOS technology able to resume performance improvement. The key requirements for a viable alternative are scalability to nanoscale dimensions following Moores Law and simultaneous reduction of line voltage in order to limit switching power. Achieving these two aims for both transistors and memory allows clock speed to again increase with dimensional scaling, a result that would have great impact across the IT industry. We propose to demonstrate an entirely new low-voltage, memory element that makes use of internal transduction in which a voltage state external to the device is converted to an internal acoustic signal that drives an insulator-metal transition. Modelling based on the properties of known materials at device dimensions on the 15 nm scale predicts that this mechanism enables device operation at voltages an order of magnitude lower than CMOS technology while achieving 10GHz operating speed; power is thus reduced two orders.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: SFS-24-2016 | Award Amount: 2.00M | Year: 2017

EURASTIP will evaluate and prepare for the launch of an international multi-stakeholder platform (MSP), so as to provide a new mechanism to create and reinforce international cooperation on sustainable aquaculture between Europe and South-East Asia and will focus on actions that will provide mutual benefit to both regions. EURASTIP, headed by the European Aquaculture Technology and Innovation Platform (EATiP) will create and support 3 National Pilot multi-stakeholder Platforms (NPPs) in major aquaculture producing countries (Thailand, Vietnam and Bangladesh) and develop road-map models for others in the region, providing the foundation for an international MSP. It will create, develop and reinforce the networking needed for the promotion of B2B partnerships, using European and SE Asian networks, realising international brokerage events and promoting cooperation. EURASTIP will identify and address common standards for aquaculture site planning, animal health, food product safety and farm governance, supporting sustainable aquaculture development. Focus is given to reinforcing professional skills and competences in industry and research, using European and SE Asian education networks and industrial apprenticeship opportunities. The NPPs will develop vision documents, strategic research and innovation agendas (SRIAs), priorities and proposed actions; these will feed into EURASTIP impact measurement and including influence on national and regional policies. Attention is given to widespread dissemination actions, promoting EURASTIP in SE Asia and in Europe, encouraging a strong legacy position. URASTIP will provide recommendations and a plan for the establishment of an international MSP, covering its scope and operation further to the project timeline, leading to reinforced long-term international cooperation efforts and opportunities.


Patent
Koninklijke KPN N.V., Iminds and Ghent University | Date: 2015-12-09

The invention relates to a method, a system and various components of such a system for selecting a chunk identifier in a content delivery network. In said network a first and a second chunk are available, belonging to different quality representations of a content item. A client device transmits a first chunk retrieval request for retrieving a first chunk and a further request. In response to said first chunk retrieval request and/or said further request, delivery path information is transmitted. The delivery path information may comprise chunk identifiers and bandwidth indicators. On the basis of the delivery path information the client device determines a chunk identifier to be included in a second chunk retrieval request for retrieving a second chunk.


Patent
Koninklijke KPN N.V., Iminds and Ghent University | Date: 2015-05-29

The invention relates to a method, a system and various components of such a system for selecting a chunk identifier in a content delivery network. In said network a first and a second chunk are available, belonging to different quality representations of a content item. A client device transmits a first chunk retrieval request for retrieving a first chunk and a further request. In response to said first chunk retrieval request and/or said further request, delivery path information is transmitted. The delivery path information may comprise chunk identifiers and bandwidth indicators. On the basis of the delivery path information the client device determines a chunk identifier to be included in a second chunk retrieval request for retrieving a second chunk.


Patent
Koninklijke Kpn N.V., Iminds Vzw and Ghent University | Date: 2015-01-22

A method for enabling restoration of an operational state on a server node is disclosed. The method includes intercepting, by a state directory, traffic between the server node and a client communicably connected to the server node over a network to derive the operational state. At least a part of the traffic between the server node and the client leads to establishment of the operational state on the server node. The method further includes storing the operational state in the state directory, detecting, by the state directory, that the server node has lost the operational state, and providing, by the state directory, the operational state to the server node after detecting that the server node has lost the operational state.


Patent
Ghent University and Isis Innovation Ltd. | Date: 2011-04-11

The invention provides a layered double hydroxide compound for use in modulating an immune response to an antigen, and an immune modulator composition comprising the layered double hydroxide and an antigen. The compound is of formula (I), (II), or (III) [M^(I)M^(III)_(2)(OH)_(6)]^(+[A)^(n)_(1/n)](I) [M^(II)_((1x))M^(III)_(x)(OH)_(2)]^(x+)[A^(n)_(x/n)](II) [M^(II)M^(III)_(4)(OH)_(12)][A^(n)_(2/n)](III) in which M^(I )is Li^(+), M^(II )is a divalent metal cation or a mixture of two or more divalent metal cations, M^(III )is a trivalent metal cation or a mixture of two or more trivalent metal cations, or a mixture of one or more trivalent metal cation with one or more quadravalent metal cation, x is from to , and A is an interlayer anion having a charge n, wherein optionally some or all of the interlayer anion A may be replaced by one or biologically active agent and/or one or more antigen, and wherein A is selected from conjugate bases of acids having a pKa of 1 or higher, except for in LDHs of formula (II) when M^(II )comprises Ca^(2+) and in LDHs of formula (I), wherein A is selected from conjugate bases of acids having a pKa of 4 or higher.


Patent
University College Cork, Ghent University, Technical University of Delft, Tel Aviv University, Katholieke Unviversiteit Leuven Ku Leuven Research & Development and Interuniversitair Micro Electronica Centrum Vzw | Date: 2013-03-15

A hydrogel based occlusion system, a method for occluding vessels, appendages or aneurysms, and a method for hydrogel synthesis are disclosed. The hydrogel based occlusion system includes a hydrogel having a shrunken and a swollen state and a delivery tool configured to deliver the hydrogel to a target occlusion location. The hydrogel is configured to permanently occlude the target occlusion location in the swollen state. The hydrogel may be an electro-activated hydrogel (EAH) which could be electro-activated with a delivery system to control the degree of swelling/shrinking.


Patent
Koninklijke KPN N.V., Iminds Vzw and Ghent University | Date: 2014-12-23

A method for binding a first and second devices is disclosed. The method is implemented using the architectural principles of REST, which allows a binding initiator to directly contact the first device and instruct the device of actions to be taken. Specifically, the binding initiator may contact the first device by providing a first REST request to the device, the request specifying that the first device is to monitor a state of a particular REST resource identified by the request and is to trigger the second device to perform a specified action when the state of that REST resource satisfies a particular condition. Using REST further allows the first device to directly contact the second device and instruct the second device to perform the specified action. Since the first device is now able to directly contact the second device, these two devices may be considered to be bound.


Patent
Koninklijke KPN N.V., Iminds and Ghent University | Date: 2016-07-19

A method of provisioning a service in a communication network is described, in which the service comprises at least one virtual network function and at least one virtual network path, which at least one virtual network function and at least one virtual network path are to be implemented in the communication network. The method including obtaining affinity constraints and/or anti-affinity constraints relating to mapping the at least one virtual network path onto the communication network, optionally obtaining affinity constraints and/or anti-affinity constraints relating to mapping the at least one virtual network function onto the communication network, and mapping the at least one virtual network function and at least one virtual network path onto the communication network subject to said constraints.


Patent
Koninklijke KPN N.V., Iminds and Ghent University | Date: 2015-02-24

A method and system for enabling a plurality of adaptive streaming client devices to share network resources includes a network node monitoring chunk request messages of client devices configured to select a quality level of a chunk from a plurality of quality levels and to request a media server for transmission of a chunk of the selected quality level. The quality level in a monitored chunk request message of a client device is used to estimate local quality information associated with the quality performance of the client device. Global quality information, determined based on the estimated local quality information associated with the client devices, and being indicative of the global quality performance of the client devices, is sent to the client devices. The client devices are configured for selecting a quality level for a subsequent chunk based on the global quality information and based on local quality information determined by the client during or after rendering media data of a requested chunk such that deviations between the global quality information and the local quality information is minimized.


Patent
Koninklijke KPN N.V., Ghent University and Iminds Vzw | Date: 2014-07-02

A method for creating a profile for accessing or manipulating resources across a plurality of nodes in a network is disclosed. An entity manager receives a request from a client to create a profile, and preferably validates the request. The entity manager generates said profile and the profile is addressable by a profile identifier. A client may use the profile to interact with the resources across the plurality of nodes using the profile identifier.


Patent
Koninklijke Kpn N.V., Iminds and Ghent University | Date: 2013-12-27

To alleviate constrained nodes (102a-e) from implementing a functionality, a functionality is emulated by an intermediary node (110) for the constrained nodes (102a-e). The intermediary node is configured to intercept requests and process the requests on behalf of the node to fulfill a functionality. The functionality is typically not supported by the constrained node (102a-e). The support for the functionality is added to resource discovery responses, resource announcement messages, and/or resource registration messages to indicate to a client or a resource directory that the emulated functionality is supported by the node.


Patent
Koninklijke Kpn N.V., Iminds and Ghent University | Date: 2013-12-27

A method for an intermediary node to reduce a number of server-client sessions between a server (104) and a plurality of clients (102a, 102b, 102c) communicably connected to the server (104) over a network is disclosed. The intermediary node (106) intercepts a first request and a second request destined to the server (104) from a first client (102a; 102b; 102c) and a second client (102a; 102b; 102c). The intermediary node (106) establishes a server-client session, between the intermediary node (106) and the server (104), using the first request. If the first request overlaps in part with the second request and if a part of the second request is not overlapping with the first request, the intermediary node (106) updates the server-client session between the intermediary node (106) and the server (104) to include a part of the second request.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: KBBE-2009-1-3-01 | Award Amount: 4.09M | Year: 2010

Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the major cause of reproductive and respiratory problems in pigs worldwide. Controlling this disease is a top priority in pig producing countries. Due to mutations at a high frequency, new variants of the virus appear that are no longer effectively controlled by the commercial vaccines. In addition, highly virulent variants emerge, leading to high losses. With regard to animal welfare and agricultural economics, there is an urgent need to control PRRS. Furthermore, the abusive use of antibiotics to control PRRSV-associated respiratory problems may lead to resistance that may endanger public health. PoRRSCon is an initiative of 14 partners originating from Europe and Asia with strong expertises in virology and immunology. They are doing frontline research on PRRSV and/or vaccine development. Two of these partners are leading European pharmaceutical companies that will guide the consortium in the direction of exploitable results. By joining their strengths they have an ideal position to be successful in one of the most difficult challenges in pig health, controlling PRRS. To reach this final goal, the following objectives are forwarded:(i) characterize genetically and antigenically current PRRSV isolates in Europe and Asia, (ii) have a better understanding of the complex pathogenesis of PRRSV infections, immune response against PRRSV and immune modulation by PRRSV, (iii) define the genetic base of PRRSV virulence, (iv) identify PRRSV proteins and domains on these viral proteins that are involved in the induction of the immunity against PRRSV and in the immune modulation of PRRSV, (v) develop new generation, efficacious and safe marker vaccines that can be adapted to temporary changes and geographical differences and (vi) develop DIVA assays that allow to differentiate infected from vaccinated animals. At the end, it will be possible to set up a control strategy by combining marker vaccines with DIVA assays


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2009-1.2-4 | Award Amount: 9.31M | Year: 2010

Following the pioneering experiences which lasted several decades, particle therapy has become a recognized way of curing cancer. 2 new European dual-ion facilities (Heidelberg, Pavia) will soon become operational, followed by several others which are today at different stages of planning and construction. Hadron therapy faces the challenge of improving treatment outcomes with tools able to provide on-line a 4 dimensional feedback of the irradiation to enhance the dose conformation to the cancer volume and improve the treatment of moving organs. ENVISION is set up by 15 leading European research organisations, and 1 leading industrial partner IBA , to respond to these challenges. CERN is project coordinator and the majority of the key European experts in this field are involved, as well as the Hadron Research Facilities (Heidelberg, Pavia) who will immediately benefit from the developments foreseen in this project. A valorisation committee with members of the industrial partners has been established to maximally exploit the results. ENVISION tackles the problems of on-line Dose Monitoring and of performing accurate Quality Assurance tests by developing novel imaging modalities related to dose deposition and allow assessing the treated volume and deriving reliable indicators of the delivered dose. It concentrates on the detection of nuclear reaction products produced by the interaction of the beam with atomic nuclei of the tissue (positron emitting nuclides for ibPET, photons or light charged particles for ibSPAT). The methods are applicable to all therapy relevant ion species. The application of TOF techniques with superior time resolution to beam delivery integrated double head ibPET scanners has the potential for improving ibPET image quality. Furthermore, the real-time observation of the dose delivery process will become feasible for the 1st time, substantially reducing intervention times in case of treatment mistakes or incidents.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2009-1-2-13 | Award Amount: 5.09M | Year: 2010

The recent decline of European eel (Anguilla anguilla) and no signs of recovery has brought attention to the biologically unsustainable exploitation of the stock. In September 2007, the EU has adopted the Council Regulation 1100/2007 establishing measures for the recovery of the European eel stock. However, eel are still fished intensively for human consumption while aquaculture and restocking rely exclusively on the supply of glass eels caught each year. A controlled production of eel larvae is ever more urgent. The objective of PRO-EEL is to develop standardised protocols for production of high quality gametes, viable eggs and feeding larvae. The approach is to expand knowledge about the intricate hormonal control and physiology of eels which complicates artificial reproduction. This knowledge will be applied in the development of suitable methods to induce maturation considering different rearing conditions. Knowledge about the gametogenesis and maturation pattern will be developed in small scale tests and applied to establish standardised fertilisation procedures. New knowledge about functional anatomy of embryos and yolksac larvae will be applied to develop suitable feed. Protocols for larval production will be tested in full scale experimental facilities managed in collaboration with a qualified SME. The integrated protocols and technology development will be evaluated relative to the output of healthy embryos and yolksac larvae. Larval feeds will be developed towards pioneering first-feeding in European eel larvae, which will be a major breakthrough and promising step towards a self-sustained aquaculture. The strength of the project is its interdisciplinary approach and the unique expertise of the consortium. PRO-EEL brings together leading institutes in eel reproduction complemented by excellence in disciplines filling gaps in knowledge and technology. A tight collaboration with the aquaculture industry promotes the applicability of developed technology.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME | Phase: SME-1 | Award Amount: 1.79M | Year: 2009

Current procedures for the design of WWTP controllers are usually based on long and very expensive experimental studies. In this respect, the availability of WWTP simulation tools specific for control design would allow automation companies to establish and complement experimental procedures with enhanced procedures based on mathematical modeling and simulation. In addition, WWTP simulation software companies will find in automation companies a further potential market for selling their software products. Accordingly, the objective of this proposal is to design, implement and validate new simulation tools for practical control. Based on this WWTP virtualization, it will be feasible to manufacture enhanced and cost-effective control products, tested by simulation previous to their full-scale implementation. To achieve these objectives, 3 software layers will be developed: Mass, Instrumentation and actuation & Automation and control layers. These developments will then be tested both at industrial and urban WWT scenarios. This work will be driven by 3 SME developers (M4W, software simulator, MSI, automation company, and NASKEO, environmental engineering) and 2 end user (SCAD, SME as industrial WWTP, and AGIPUZKOA as urban WWTP). They trust in the know-how of 3 key RTDs in this sector (CEIT, mathematic modeling and conventional control expert, UGENT, computer science expert, and INRA, advanced control and anaerobic digestion expert). Due to this project, 3 exploitable results will be developed: (1) WWTP Software simulator, (2) Advanced controllers and (3) Enhanced treatment technologies. IPR has been divided among partners in order to maximize impact at European level. If this project is successful, the gathered knowledge will put Europe in pole position with respect to tackling optimisation of wastewater treatment processes in a sustainable way. In this sense, exploitable results can be commercialized together in a joined offer or as separate results.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2013.1.3-05 | Award Amount: 11.61M | Year: 2013

EFFORT studies the complex epidemiology and ecology of antimicrobial resistance and the interactions between bacterial communities, commensals and pathogens in animals, the food chain and the environment.This will be conducted by a combination of epidemiological and ecological studies using newly developed molecular and bio-informatics technologies. EFFORT will include an exposure assessment of humans from animal/environmental sources. The ecological studies on isolates will be verified by in vitro and in vivo studies. Moreover, real-life intervention studies will be conducted aiming at reducing the use of antimicrobials in veterinary practice. Focus will be on understanding the eco-epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance from animal origin and based on this, predicting and limiting the future evolution and exposure to humans of the most clinically important resistance by synthesising different sources of information in our prediction models. Through its results, the EFFORT research will provide scientific evidence and high quality data that will inform decision makers, the scientific community and other stakeholders about the consequences of AMR in the food chain, in relation to animal health and welfare, food safety and economic aspects. These results can be used to support political decisions and to prioritize risk management options along the food chain. The EFFORT consortium is made up of 20 partners from 10 European countries: Belgium, Bulgaria, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Spain and Switzerland. The senior investigators leading this proposal bring together complementary strengths antimicrobial resistance, food safety, epidemiology of food borne pathogens and risk modelling, environmental epidemiology and microbial ecology, exposure assessment, veterinary microbiology, preventive molecular characterization of AMR, genetics and biology of DNA transfer mechanisms, whole genome sequencing for bacteria and economics of animal diseases


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENERGY.2013.7.1.1 | Award Amount: 4.33M | Year: 2013

The significant rise in distributed renewable energy sources has placed an enormous burden on the secure operation of the electrical grid, impacting both the transmission system operators (TSOs) and distribution system operators (DSOs). The massive increase of the intermittent DRES in low (LV) and medium (MV) networks has led to a bidirectional power flow which raises the urgent need for new operational and control strategies in order to maintain the ability of the system to provide the consumers with reliable supply of electricity at an acceptable power quality level. Technically, INCREASE will focus on how to manage renewable energy sources in LV and MV networks, to provide ancillary services (towards DSO, but also TSOs), in particular voltage control and the provision of reserve. INCREASE will investigate the regulatory framework, grid code structure and ancillary market mechanisms, and propose adjustments to facilitate successful provisioning of ancillary services that are necessary for the operation of the electricity grid, including flexible market products. INCREASE will enable DRES and loads to go beyond just exchanging power with the grid which will enable the DSO to evolve from a congestion manager to capacity manager. This will result in a more efficient exploitation of the current grid capacity, thus facilitating higher DRES penetration at reduced cost. Because of the more efficient use of the existing infrastructure, grid tariffs could decrease, potentially resulting in a lower cost for the consumers. The INCREASE simulation platform will enable the validation of the proposed solutions and provides the DSOs with a tool they can use to investigate the influence of DRES on their distribution network. The INCREASE solutions will also be validated (i) by lab tests, as well as (ii) in three field trials in the real-life operational distribution network of Stromnetz Steiermark in Austria, of Elektro Gorenjska in Slovenia and of Liander in the Netherlands.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CPCSA | Phase: ICT-2013.9.9 | Award Amount: 72.73M | Year: 2013

Understanding the human brain is one of the greatest challenges facing 21st century science. If we can rise to the challenge, we can gain profound insights into what makes us human, develop new treatments for brain diseases and build revolutionary new computing technologies. Today, for the first time, modern ICT has brought these goals within sight. The goal of the Human Brain Project, part of the FET Flagship Programme, is to translate this vision into reality, using ICT as a catalyst for a global collaborative effort to understand the human brain and its diseases and ultimately to emulate its computational capabilities. The Human Brain Project will last ten years and will consist of a ramp-up phase (from month 1 to month 36) and subsequent operational phases.\nThis Grant Agreement covers the ramp-up phase. During this phase the strategic goals of the project will be to design, develop and deploy the first versions of six ICT platforms dedicated to Neuroinformatics, Brain Simulation, High Performance Computing, Medical Informatics, Neuromorphic Computing and Neurorobotics, and create a user community of research groups from within and outside the HBP, set up a European Institute for Theoretical Neuroscience, complete a set of pilot projects providing a first demonstration of the scientific value of the platforms and the Institute, develop the scientific and technological capabilities required by future versions of the platforms, implement a policy of Responsible Innovation, and a programme of transdisciplinary education, and develop a framework for collaboration that links the partners under strong scientific leadership and professional project management, providing a coherent European approach and ensuring effective alignment of regional, national and European research and programmes. The project work plan is organized in the form of thirteen subprojects, each dedicated to a specific area of activity.\nA significant part of the budget will be used for competitive calls to complement the collective skills of the Consortium with additional expertise.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2013.3.3-01 | Award Amount: 6.22M | Year: 2013

IB2Market aims to bring industrial biotechnology from the research lab to the market and to solve the bottle-necks in industrialisation. Specifically, the project targets the development and scale-up of new industrial biotechnology processes that have recently been developed to produce the following compounds: 1. Biosurfactants, tensioactive ingredients with a wide range of applications. Specifically, the project targets bola-sophorolipids, a completely new type of biosurfactants. 2. Specialty carbohydrates, mainly for pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications. Specifically, the project targets L-fucose and fucosylated oligosaccharides that are very difficult to produce through extraction or chemical synthesis. For both product lines, the fermentation process and down-stream processing will be optimised and scaled up to 15.000 litre scale. Sufficient amounts of product will be produced for application testing and exploratory marketing, in order to identify the most interesting market segments. The technical, economic and environmental sustainability of the process from biomass to product application will also be assessed, with particular emphasis on identifying and solving the bottlenecks in the innovation chain. A valorisation plan will be drafted to complete the innovation chain. The project will result in the industrialisation and commercialisation of the developed products and processes. The project consortium has all the required players to move a process from lab scale to industrialisation: an open innovation pilot plant (Bio Base Europe Pilot Plant), a biotech start-up company (Inbiose), marketing companies for surfactants (EOC-surfactants) and specialty carbohydrates (Carbosynth), the RTD organisation that developed the processes at lab-scale (Ghent University), an application developer (Innovhub) and service-providing SMEs (Nova institute and BCNP consultants).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE.2010.1.3-05 | Award Amount: 1.21M | Year: 2010

This European surveillance network for influenza in pigs (ESNIP) 3 will maintain and expand surveillance networks established during previous EC concerted actions (ESNIP 1, QLK2-CT-2000-01636; ESNIP 2, SSPE-022749). Three work packages (WP 2, 3, 4) aim to increase the knowledge of the epidemiology and evolution of swine influenza (SI) virus (SIV) in European pigs through organised field surveillance programmes (WP2). Virus strains detected in these programmes will be subjected to detailed characterisation both antigenically (WP3) and genetically (WP4) using standardised methodology. Specifically this will involve timely information on genomic data and generation of antigenic maps using the latest technology. These analyses will provide significant and timely added value to knowledge of SIV. A strong focus will be monitoring spread and independent evolution of pandemic H1N1 2009 virus in pigs. All these data will in turn be used to improve the diagnosis of SI by updating the reagents used in the recommended techniques (WP2). The virus bank and electronic database that were established during ESNIPs 1 and 2 will also be expanded and formally curated with relevant SIV isolates and information for global dissemination within and outwith the consortium (WP5). ESNIP 3 represents the only organised surveillance network for influenza in pigs and seeks to strengthen formal interactions with human and avian surveillance networks previously established in ESNIP 2. A timely and transparent interaction with these networks will be a key output. These approaches are entirely consistent with improved pandemic preparedness and planning for human influenza whilst providing an evidence base for decisions in relation to veterinary health. The project consortium consists of 24 participants, which contribute a blend of different specialisms and skills ensuring multi-disciplinary cutting-edge outputs. The vast majority of the partners are actively working with SIV including in a field setting. Twenty-one participants are from 11 EU member states, seven of which were actively involved in ESNIP 2. Co-operation with partners in China and North America will continue to promote a greater understanding of the epidemiology of SIVs at a global level.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2009-1-3-03 | Award Amount: 4.03M | Year: 2010

The BEE DOC comprises a network of eleven partners from honeybee pathology, chemistry, genetics and apicultural extension aiming to improve colony helath of honeybees. The BEE DOC will empirically and experimentally fill knowledge gaps in honey bee pest and diseases, including the colony collapse disorder and quantify the impact of ineractions between parasites, pathogens and pesticides on honey bee mortality. Specifically BEE DOC will show for two model parasites (Nosema and Varroa mites), three model viruses (Deformed Wing Virus, Black Queen Cell Virus, Israel Acute Paralysis Virus) and two model pestcides (fipronil, -fluvalinate) how interactions affect individual bees and colonies in different European areas. The BEE DOC will use transcriptome anayses to explore host-pathogen-pesticide interaction and identify novel genes for disease resistance. The BEE DOC will specifically address sublethal and chronic exposure to pesticides and screen how apicultural practices affect colony health. The BEE DOC will develop novel diagnostic screening methods and develop sustainable concepts for disease prevention using novel treatments and selection tools for resitant stock. The BEE DOC will be linked to various national and international ongoing European, North-, and Latin-American colony health monitoring and research programs, which will not only ensure a pan European but also a global visibility and the transfer of results to a world wide community of beekeepers.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2013.1.3-03 | Award Amount: 12.00M | Year: 2013

Production diseases compromise health and welfare, generating inefficiencies which impact adversely on profitability, environmental footprint, antibiotic use and product quality. The PROHEALTH project will develop understanding of the multi-factorial dimension of animal pa-thologies linked to the intensification of production and use this to develop, evaluate and disseminate ef-fective control strategies to reduce impact. It will address production diseases of pigs and poultry raised in a wide range of EU intensive systems, using both epidemiological and experimental approaches to consider the extent of, and the risk factors associated with diseases, the influence of genotype and its modification by early life experience, and the dynamic influences of the environment on disease. The mechanisms underlying differences in disease susceptibility will be explored at different levels. Improvement strategies for diseases including neo-natal mortality, gut and respiratory disorders, leg and metabolic disorders will be evaluated in farm scale tests, and data from diverse systems used to model whole-chain socioeconomic implications of disease states and their alleviation. The consortium has expertise in veterinary science and epidemiology, physiology and immunology, ge-netics, nutrition, socioeconomics, welfare and production science of pigs and poultry. The 10 academic, 1 association 4 industry and 7 SME partners cover the full European geographic range to derive meaningful epidemiological data and test interventions across diverse production circumstances. Dissemination activities will encompass all stakeholders in the food chain and establish new e-learning tools. PROHEALTH will deliver novel diagnostics for the propensity to develop production diseases and their occurrence, and multifactorial improvement strategies that can be applied to produce better quality products in a welfare friendly manner and improve competitiveness and sustainability of EU pig & poultry systems


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: Fission-2011-3.5.1 | Award Amount: 1.55M | Year: 2012

Creating a sustainable network in biological dosimetry that involves a large number of experienced laboratories throughout the EU will significantly improve the accident and emergency response capabilities in case of a large-scale radiological emergency. A well organised cooperated action involving EU laboratories will offer the only chance for a fast and trustworthy dose assessment urgently needed in an emergency situation. The goal of RENEB is to establish a sustainable European network in biological dosimetry involving 23 organisations from 16 countries identified by the TENEB survey, that will guarantee highest efficiency in processing and scoring of biological samples for fast, reliable results implemented in the EU emergency management. This goal will be achieved through 5 tasks: 1) To create an operational basis of the network, based on coordination of the existing reliable and proven methods in biological dosimetry. 2) To expand and improve the network implementing appropriate new, molecular biology methods and integrating new partners. 3) To assure high quality standards by education and training activities of members and interested non-members. Here, special focus will be placed on quality assurance and management regarding the performed assays and involved laboratories. 4) To develop an operational structure of the network including contacts to national first responders, a well organised transnational infrastructure to facilitate cross-border transport of human biological samples, a long term funding strategy and to prepare an agenda to transform RENEB into a legal organisation. 5) To guarantee dissemination of knowledge by providing access to internal and external communication platforms and databases and close cooperation with national and global emergency preparedness systems and organisations. All of these activities are strictly complementary to on-going projects in the EU Security Research Programme, specifically to MULTIBIODOSE and to EURADOS.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE.2010.3.3-01 | Award Amount: 3.73M | Year: 2010

This project aims to develop novel biocatalysts for the production of glycosides (NOVOSIDES). Glycosylated compounds have a wide range of applications, but very few enzymes are able to glycosylate small organic molecules cost-efficiently at the industrial scale. Therefore, glycosylation reactions catalysed by transglycosidases, glycoside phosphorylases and glycoside hydrolases will be explored in more detail. These enzymes catalyze the transfer a glycosyl group from a cheap and readily available donor substrate to a variety of acceptors. To exploit their full potential, the enzymes specificity and stability against high temperatures and the presence of organic co-solvents will be optimised by means of directed evolution. A large and diverse collection of enzymes will first be established by screening in natural environments and by the mining of public (meta)genome databases. The enzyme collection will then be screened for activity on a variety of representative acceptors from different chemical classes. This will allow the identification of the most promising enzymes for optimisation through semi-rational and random mutagenesis. The high-throughput screening of natural and variant enzymes will be performed with newly developed fluorescent probes, that allow fast and accurate measurements of carbohydrate-active enzymes in a direct and non-destructive assay. To achieve these ambitious goals, a complementary consortium of academia and industry has been formed that covers the whole range of required expertises. The economical potential of our technology will be demonstrated by the development and scale-up of selected glycosylation reactions at pilot-plant facilities. The produced glycosides will be actively marketed to potential end-users to promote the valorisation of the projects results and to initiate future collaborations on novel target compounds.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2011.1.3-04 | Award Amount: 3.91M | Year: 2012

Infections with parasitic worms (nematodes and trematodes) represent a significant economic and welfare burden to the European ruminant livestock industry. The increasing prevalence of anthelmintic resistance means that current control programmes are costly and unsustainable in the long term. Recent changes in the epidemiology, seasonality and geographic distribution of helminth infections have been attributed to climate change. However, other changes in environment (e.g. land use) and in livestock farming, such as intensification and altered management practices, will also have an impact on helminth infections. Sustainable control of helminth infections in a changing world requires detailed knowledge of these interactions. GLOWORM will devise new, sustainable strategies for the effective control of ruminant helminthoses in the face of global change. We will: (1) optimise diagnosis, by developing novel, high-throughput diagnostic tests for mixed helminth infections, sub-clinical infections and anthelmintic resistance, (2) map, monitor and predict the impact of global change on parasite epidemiology, leading to spatial risk maps and improved forecasting of disease, (3) produce predictive models to identify optimal future intervention strategies, (4) identify and mitigate the economic impacts of infections and (5) involve end-users in the production and dissemination of detailed advice for effective worm control. We will work together to develop a panel of innovative technologies and models to monitor and predict changing patterns of infection and disease, optimise the use of anthelmintics to limit the development and spread of drug resistance, and reduce the overall economic impact of helminth infections. GLOWORM will contribute to the continued productivity and profitability of European livestock farming by delivering new tools, strategies and recommendations for the monitoring, surveillance, and sustainable control of helminth infections in grazing livestock.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2008-1.1.2 | Award Amount: 5.65M | Year: 2009

EMbaRC will establish a self-sustainable community of European Microbial Resource Centres representing a large bio-diversity and offering a wide-range of not only bio-resources but also expert services. These services will enable the development of new partnerships with public institutes in the field of biodiversity and will facilitate revenue-generating partnerships with the economic sector (large food or biotech companies, research organisations, SMEs, NGOs etc) that will be defined in a set of validate business models for Biological Resource Centres. The objective is to enable not only the EMbaRC partners but also other European BRCs, especially those who are endangered or isolated, to find complementary sources of funding to ensure their future existence. Thus EMbaRC proposes an extensive training and outreach programme targeting these collections as well as the wider research community. Furthermore providing access to the partners expert services via the transnational access proposed will enable EMbaRC to improve, coordinate and validate its offer to the research community from within both public and private sectors. Through its networking and harmonisation activities EMbaRC will lay down the foundations of the future Global Biological Resource Centre Network ensuring that European expertise and research are at the forefront of the International scene. Through the EMbaRC joint research programme the partners will pool their resources and expertise to collaboratively improve strain and DNA storage and develop new identification methods for microorganisms for the benefit of the wider scientific community.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: Ocean.2010-3 | Award Amount: 13.98M | Year: 2011

The ECO2 project sets out to assess the risks associated with the storage of CO2 below the seabed. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is regarded as a key technology for the reduction of CO2 emissions from power plants and other sources at the European and international level. The EU will hence support a selected portfolio of demonstration projects to promote, at industrial scale, the implementation of CCS in Europe. Several of these projects aim to store CO2 below the seabed. However, little is known about the short-term and long-term impacts of CO2 storage on marine ecosystems even though CO2 has been stored sub-seabed in the North Sea (Sleipner) for over 13 years and for one year in the Barents Sea (Snhvit). Against this background, the proposed ECO2 project will assess the likelihood of leakage and impact of leakage on marine ecosystems. In order to do so ECO2 will study a sub-seabed storage site in operation since 1996 (Sleipner, 90 m water depth), a recently opened site (Snhvit, 2008, 330 m water depth), and a potential storage site located in the Polish sector of the Baltic Sea (B3 field site, 80 m water depth) covering the major geological settings to be used for the storage of CO2. Novel monitoring techniques will be applied to detect and quantify the fluxes of formation fluids, natural gas, and CO2 from storage sites and to develop appropriate and effective monitoring strategies. Field work at storage sites will be supported by modelling and laboratory experiments and complemented by process and monitoring studies at natural CO2 seeps that serve as analogues for potential CO2 leaks at storage sites. ECO2 will also investigate the perception of marine CCS in the public and develop effective means to disseminate the project results to stakeholders and policymakers. Finally, a best practice guide for the management of sub-seabed CO2 storage sites will be developed applying the precautionary principle and valuing the costs for monitoring and remediation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE.2012.2.1-01 | Award Amount: 3.83M | Year: 2012

Health-related symbols and claims may be potentially influential in supporting informed choice, furthering healthier consumer food choices, and strengthening competitiveness of the European food industry in bringing about food products that support a healthier lifestyle. However, current insights into how health symbols and claims are understood and used in real-world shopping situations are limited, making it difficult to derive recommendations on the wording and design of health claims and symbols, including the context in which these appear on the food label. The objectives of this project are to determine how health-related symbols and claims, in their context, are understood by consumers, and how they affect purchasing and consumption, taking into account both individual differences in needs and wants and country-specific differences with regard to use of health claims and symbols. Guidelines will be developed for EU policy directed towards health-related symbols and claims, and a set of methods will be developed that can be used by policy-makers and industry to assess the effects of health claims and symbols as these appear on the market. The project will draw heavily on the involvement of stakeholders from the whole food sector to ensure results with high practical relevance.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CPCSA | Phase: INFRA-2009-1.2.3 | Award Amount: 5.03M | Year: 2009

The proposed project will deliver an electronic infrastructure and supporting mechanisms for the identification, deposition, access, and monitoring of FP7 and ERC funded articles, where the main supporting mechanism will be the establishment and operation of the European Helpdesk System. Additionally, the project will offer a special repository for articles that can be stored neither in institutional nor in subject-based/thematic repositories, while it will also prepare the way for similar functionality on scientific data. All deposited articles and data will be freely accessible worldwide through a new portal to the products of EU-funded research, built as part of this project. It will also connect research input (project contracts) with research output (publications and data) and monitor the system use to obtain statistically-significant trends about both. Thematically, the project will focus on peer-reviewed publications (primarily, journal articles in final or pre-print form, but also conference articles, when considered important) in at least the seven disciplines highlighted in the Open Access pilot (energy, environment, health, cognitive systems-interaction-robotics, electronic infrastructures, science in society, and socioeconomic sciences-humanities) and on research datasets in a subset of them. Geographically, however, it will have a definitive European footprint by covering the European Union in its entirety, engaging people and scientific repositories in almost all 27 member states and beyond. The electronic infrastructure built by the project will be based on state-of-the-art software services of the D-NET package developed within the DRIVER and DRIVER-II projects and the Invenio digital repository software developed at CERN. These will be further enhanced and complemented with services developed within OpenAIRE to address critical requirements and issues that arise in the target environment and require further investigation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.3.1-1 | Award Amount: 7.08M | Year: 2014

Aging populations, rising costs and sustainable delivery of high-quality care are increasingly common concerns in all EU countries. PACE aims to perform comparative effectiveness research concerning palliative care in long term care facilities (LTCFs) in Europe. While a growing number of older people will require palliative care in institutionalized settings, palliative care has only recently begun to be developed in LTCFs and effectiveness research hardly exists. PACE aims to compare, in six EU countries (BE, UK, IT, FI, PL, NL) (1) the effectiveness of health care systems with and without formal palliative care structures in LTCFs on patient and family outcomes quality of dying, quality of life quality of palliative care and cost-effectiveness, by performing a representative cross-sectional study in 48 LTCFs per country to include at least 1,152 deceased residents (2) the impact of the UK palliative care health service intervention Route to Success on patient outcomes, family and staff in LTCFs, by performing a controlled cluster trial across the six countries, randomly allocating 24 LTCFs to intervention and 24 to control. The PACE consortium brings together leading academic partners from multiple disciplines with EU organizations/networks actively tapping into the most important professional groups and policy-makers in the field, making it possible to influence research, practice, policy and public at national and international level in and beyond participating PACE countries. PACE will help to achieve the objectives of the European 2020 Strategy, specifically the European Innovation Partnership on Healthy and Active Aging. Based on its study results, PACE will develop tools to assist practitioners and policy and decision-makers to make evidence-based decisions regarding best palliative care practices in LTCFs. This will ultimately lead to optimizing the delivery of palliative care to the large proportion of EU citizens living and dying in old age.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: NoE | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.4.1-3 | Award Amount: 14.22M | Year: 2011

ENCCA aims to establish a durable, European Virtual Institute clinical and translational research in childhood and adolescent cancers that will define and implement an integrated research strategy and will facilitate the necessary investigator-driven clinical trials to introduce the new generation of biologically targeted drugs into standard of care for children and adolescents with cancer. This will lead to more efficacious and less toxic therapies that will maximise the quality of life of the increasing number of survivors of cancer at a young age in Europe and allow them to assume their proper place in society. This biologically-driven research agenda will improve training of the clinical investigators and translational scientists of the future to spread excellence, increase capacity to participate in research and monitor outcomes across Europe. Patients and their families will be full partners and will be better informed about the need for and processes of clinical research. They will be in a better situation to care from their long term health risks for children. Drug development will be accelerated in partnership with industry through improved access to young patients with cancer, to academic expertise in care, clinical and biological research. All of this will be achieved with respect for the highest ethical and patient safety standards. ENCCA will bring all stakeholders to the table in a timely and efficacious manner. It will address the needs of all the current multinational clinical trial groups for the benefit of children with cancer. It will provide them with common tools and approaches to solve the bottlenecks in testing new therapeutic strategies for those rare diseases in a vulnerable age group and in running a competitive clinical research agenda. Ongoing efforts to coordinate EU and US clinical research will be reinforced. ENCCA will be led by the most active EU institutes in the field (31), recognised as being at the forefront of excellence.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: NOE | Phase: ICT-2007.1.1 | Award Amount: 4.75M | Year: 2008

The BONE-proposal builds on the foundations laid out by the ePhoton/ONe projects in the previous Framework Programme. This Network of Excellence has brought together over several years the research activities within Europe in the field of Optical Networks and the BONE-project intends to validate this effort by stimulating a more intensified collaboration, exchange of researchers and building on Virtual Centres of Excellence that can serve to European industry with education and training, research tools and testlabs and pave the way to new technologies and architectures.\nThe Network of the Future, which is the central theme of this Call, will have to cope with a wide variety of applications running on a wide variety of terminals and with an increasing number of connected devices and increasing speed and data-loads. The BONE-proposal does not look into issues as convergence between mobile and fixed networks, nor does it consider issues regarding the optimised broadband access in the last mile using a wide variety of technologies such as DSL, cable, WiMAX, WiFi, PLC,... The BONE-proposal looks further into the future and takes as the final Network of the Future:\n- a high capacity, flexible, reconfigurable and self-healing optical Core and Metro network which supports the transport of massive amounts of data\n- a FTTx solution in which the x is as close as possible to the home, at the home, or even in the home. From this point the user is connected using terminal-specific technologies (wireless to handheld devices, fiber to home cinema, wireless to laptop, fixed connection to desktop,...)\nBONE clearly identifies the existence of the current technologies and also recognizes the fact that users also require the mobility of wireless access, but this mobile connection ends at a gateway or access points and from there a fixed connection is required and this fixed connection will finally be an optical link.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH.2012.2.1-1 | Award Amount: 3.12M | Year: 2013

Social InnovationEmpowering the Young (SocIEtY) for the Common Good will both focus on and integrate disadvantaged young people into the research process to improve their quality of life and to foster social innovation. Therefore SocIEtY will extend the given informational basis for designing and implementing policies to reduce inequalities by giving voice and opportunities for developing aspirations to young people facing multifaceted inequalities while living in deprived city districts. The approach is to bring to the fore young persons concerns and voices about their self-perception and social participation in society. To accomplish these ambitious research tasks, the research strategy will benefit from the complementarities between qualitative and quantitative methodologies, reflected in the close interconnections between the Work Packages (WPs). SocIEtY will refine a coherent theoretical and methodological framework for the whole project on the basis of the Capability Approach. As a second step a documentary analysis and interviews with relevant political stakeholders and a longitudinal analysis of EU-SILC data will be carried out. Additionally, national and regional data for each partner country (WP3) for evaluating existing policies towards inequalities will be analysed. 11 analyses of social support networks (WP4) will be carried out, scrutinizing the strategies and policies of local actors in deprived city districts of each partner country. Finally, SocIEtY will develop an innovative participative research methodology (WP5) bringing different stakeholders and different narratives together. An aim of this empirical instrument is to enable deliberative processes in which every participant has equal opportunity to voice their concerns and aspirations with regard to the common good. Traditional empirical research is combined with a participation methodology, broadening the informational basis for social innovation in public policies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SPIRE-05-2015 | Award Amount: 6.00M | Year: 2015

In ADREM, leading industries and university groups in process intensification, catalytic reactor engineering and process control team up to address the domain of resource- and energy-efficient valorisation of variable methane feedstocks to C2\ hydrocarbons. The development of new and intensified adaptable catalytic reactor systems for flexible and decentralized production at high process performance is in focus, able to operate with changing feedstock composition and deliver on-demand the required product distribution by switching selected operational/control parameters and/or changing modular catalyst cartridges. In the long term, we expect the reactors to operate energy- and emission-lean using green electricity as the direct, primary energy source. In order to converge to the optimal design, the project will utilize the unique integral, four-domain process intensification (PI) methodology, pioneered by the consortium. This is the only approach able to deliver a fully intensified equipment/process. The key feature is the systematic, simultaneous addressing of the four domains: spatial, thermodynamic, functional and temporal. ADREM will provide: highly innovative, economic and environmentally friendly processes and equipment for efficient transformation of methane into useful chemicals and liquid fuels, for which monetary savings of more than 10% are expected. process technologies applying flexible modular one-step process with high selectivity for valorisation of methane from various sources. modular (and containerized and mobile) reactors permitting flexible adaptation of the plant size to demand and also utilizing smaller or temporary sources of methane or other feeds. The project will employ emerging reactor technologies coupled to especially designed catalytic systems to address a variety of scenarios embodying methane valorisation. The concepts developed can be later readily extrapolated on other types of catalytic processes of similar sizes.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: KBBE-2008-2-3-03 | Award Amount: 1.18M | Year: 2009

The food and drink industry is the single largest manufacturing sector in the EU and is mainly comprised by SMEs and microenterprises (99.1% of European food and drink businesses). The European food industry is in the lower part of the innovation performance ranking, and is losing relative importance in the global food market. This situation was a primary reason for the initiation of the ETP Food4 Life, which seeks to stimulate and underpin innovation in the agro-food chain. TRACK_FAST is drawn from all geographic points of Europe, and its main objective is the identification of the training and career requirements of future European food scientists and technologists (FST), and implementation of a European strategy to recruit the next generation FST leaders. TRACK_FAST will achieve this goal through: Identification and definition of personal skills requirements in food job market; Developments for the regulation of food science and technology professions in Europe; Establishment of a framework for continual professional training and career development for the FST professional; and Motivation of young people to enter and pursue of a career in food science and technology in Europe. The project will therefore coordinate a programme of information and experience gathering, discussions with employers and employees, and with those responsible for providing academic and other training deliver awareness and experience in career development activities. Moreover, young students will be motivated to pursue a career in food area, thus promoting a new generation of skilled, flexible and enthusiastic food scientists and technologists. TRACK_FST will provide main stakeholders with a forum within which their main needs will be considered. Moreover, TRACK_FAST focus on the key factors to identify needs and guide future works, as well as the development of specific and effective measures to prompt changes. The consortium and work plan are framed in a strong engagement between stakeholders, thus TRACK_FAST will contribute to a more innovative and competitive food and drink sector, which is a key area for job creation, global competition and societal benefit in Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: NFRP-01-2014 | Award Amount: 6.64M | Year: 2015

The thermal-hydraulics Simulations and Experiments for the Safety Assessment of Metal cooled reactor (SESAME) project supports the development of European liquid metal cooled reactors (ASTRID, ALFRED, MYRRHA, SEALER). The project focusses on pre-normative, fundamental, safety-related, challenges for these reactors with the following objectives: Development and validation of advanced numerical approaches for the design and safety evaluation of advanced reactors; Achievement of a new or extended validation base by creation of new reference data; Establishment of best practice guidelines, Verification & Validation methodologies, and uncertainty quantification methods for liquid metal fast reactor thermal hydraulics. The SESAME project will improve the safety of liquid metal fast reactors by making available new safety related experimental results and improved numerical approaches. These will allow system designers to improve the safety relevant equipment leading to enhanced safety standards and culture. Due to the fundamental and generic nature of SESAME, developments will be of relevance also for the safety assessment of contemporary light water reactors. By extending the knowledge basis, SESAME will allow the EU member states to develop robust safety policies. At the same time, SESAME will maintain and further develop the European experimental facilities and numerical tools. The consortium of 25 partners provides American-European-wide scientific and technological excellence in liquid metal thermal hydraulics, as well as full alignment with ESNII and with NUGENIA where of interest. A close interaction with the European liquid metal cooled reactor design teams is foreseen involving them in the Senior Advisory Committee. They will actively advise on the content of the project and will be the prime end-users, ensuring their innovative reactor designs will reach highest safety standards using frontier scientific developments.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE-2007-1-2-08 | Award Amount: 7.11M | Year: 2008

Dairying is an important sector of EU agriculture, but intensification has been accompanied by an increase in N surplus. This has a negative environmental impact on groundwater (pollution with nitrates), surface water (eutrophication) and on the atmosphere (de-nitrification and ammonia volatilisation). The EU seeks to stimulate measures that improve management of nutrients, waste and water as a start to move to management practices beyond usual good-farming practice. The objective of REDNEX is to develop innovative and practical management approaches for dairy cows that reduce nitrogen excretion into the environment through the optimization of rumen function, an improved understanding and prediction of dietary nitrogen utilization for milk production and excretion in urine and faeces. Novel tools for monitoring these processes and predicting the consequences in terms of N losses onfarm will be developed. At the centre of the project is a detailed mathematical model of N utilization by the cow which will act to integrate results from previous work and from new research carried out in the project. This interlinked research aims to improve the supply of amino acids to be absorbed relative to the quantity and quality of amino acids and carbohydrates in feed allowing a reduction in N intake. Research to understand amino acid absorption, intermediary utilization and the processes involved in the transfer of urea N from blood to the gastro-intestinal tract will further underpin model development and indicate strategies to reduce N losses. To predict N losses on-farm and the impact on profitability, a harmonised applied model will be derived from the mechanistic model and will be supported by tools to better describe feeds and biomarkers to indicate N status. Impact of the research will be enabled by dissemination and knowledge interaction using a participatory approach to include the views of stakeholders and recognition of the need to provide support to EU neighbours.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.32M | Year: 2015

OPATHY is an innovative translational research training network that will explore the potential of omics technologies, including genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics, to study the interactions of yeasts that cause disease to humans (e.g. Candida and Cryptococcus sp.) with their host, and to develop new diagnostic tools to monitor yeast infections in the clinic. Today, these infections are poorly understood, difficult to diagnose, and are becoming increasingly frequent and serious, affecting over 300 million people worldwide. OPATHY will exploit omics technologies to investigate host-pathogen interactions during yeast infection and colonization with a primary focus on their potential to develop innovative diagnostics tools to improve health care. For this proteomics, transcriptomics and genomics measurements of strains and infections will be integrated with state of the art computational analyses to identify novel biomarkers able to determine the infection stage, the infective pathogen, and the potential resistance traits. This knowledge will drive the development of diagnostic tools based on the detection of specific DNA sequences (by PCR) or antibodies (by Elisa or proteomics). These tools will be validated in a clinical study of key patient cohorts. The participation of two clinical centers and four companies is of paramount importance for the network to provide an integrative and transversal research and training environment. Importantly, the methodologies and approaches of OPATHY can be easily extended to the study and identification of other human, animal and plant microbial pathogens, or the tracing of relevant industrial organisms. Grounded on solid individual research projects, OPATHY will train Early Stage Researchers in several scientific technologies and fields and transferable skills, to boost their careers as innovative and creative researchers.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.89M | Year: 2016

Nanomedicine (NM) is regarded as one of the most promising applications of nanotechnology, as it would allow the development of tailored therapies, with a high level of selectivity and efficacy. Although much research has been performed over the past decades, translation from academia to commercial application remains disappointingly low. Reasons that explain the current moderate success of NM are: (1) promising preclinical results are often poorly predictive for clinical safety and effectiveness, (2) the efficient, scalable and reproducible GMP production of nanocarriers has proven to be challenging and (3) regulatory frameworks are not yet fully equipped to efficiently facilitate the introduction of novel nanomedicines. These obstacles are often encountered since the developmental process from carrier design to clinical assessment is performed by a range of scientists from different backgrounds who have difficulty interacting and communicating with each other to clearly understand the necessary design criteria and the scope and limitations of NM. NANOMED brings together all the necessary expertise to oversee the entire development trajectory required for NM. This is achieved by the combined effort of 7 beneficiaries from academia and industry and 5 non-academic partner organisations, which are all thoroughly rooted in nanosciences and pharmaceutical sciences. Our objective is to develop scalable and highly controllable design and synthesis methods for the most promising nanomedicine types in a preclinical setting. NANOMED will train the next generation of NM scientists by offering an extensive joint training programme to 15 incoming ESRs. It focuses on promoting scientific excellence and exploits the specific research and commercial expertise and infrastructure of the NANOMED network as a whole. The exposure to all elements of NM design enables NANOMED to translate expertise from all disciplines to the ESRs, to educate the future leading scientists in the NM field.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-01-2014 | Award Amount: 3.25M | Year: 2015

The aim of this proposal is to develop wide band gap thin film solar cells based on kesterite absorbers for future application in high efficiency and low cost tandem PV devices. The SWInG working group will focus both on the development of the processes for the synthesis of such solar cells based on the Cu2ZnXY4 (with X=Sn, Si and Y= S, Se) compounds and on the understanding of the physical and electrical properties of the high band gap absorber in order to reach high conversion efficiency. The key research challenges will be: developing up-scalable processes for the synthesis of the absorbers; defining the specifications for high quality wide band gap absorbers as well as suitable back contact and buffer/window layers; assessing the potential of this technology for PV applications. The wide band gap thin films solar cells developed in this project are expected to reach a stable efficiency of 15 % on a laboratory scale and 12 % for a mini-module prototype. The publications of specifications for the synthesis of high quality Cu2ZnXY4 absorber as well as suitable back/front contact are expected. The lead users will be PV modules manufacturers that work so far with thin films technologies, as well as the companies that design and produce the machines for the synthesis of such devices. The results will be disseminated and communicated to the European PV industries and the scientific community. The intensive exchange of researchers between the partners during the project will also lead to an enhanced European collaboration in the research field of thin film solar cells.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: ISIB-02-2015 | Award Amount: 2.00M | Year: 2016

AGRIFORVALOR will close the research and innovation divide by connecting practitioners from agriculture and forestry to research and academia as well as with associations and clusters, bio -industry, policy makers; business support organisations, innovation agencies and technology transfer intermediaries in multi-actor innovation partnership networks. Theses networks will be managed by three Biomass Innovation Design Hubs, piloted in Andalucia, Hungary and Ireland. In each of these hubs, existing research results and good practices on valorization of biomass sidestreams from agro and forest will be shared and matched with the specific needs and potentials; new grass-roots ideas collected and developed; and dedicated innovation support applied to further deploy selected topics which are dealt with by multi-actor innovation partnership groups. Here, practical support in the exploitation of promising research results is complemented by assistance in business (model) development - with a tailored mix of innovation support measures offered to individual subjects. Tailor-made innovation support tools and materials will thus be developed in line with the identified needs of forestry and agriculture. In each hub, Steering Committees consisting of experts on exploitation and business development will be set-up to monitor and consult the conceptualization and implementation of the trainings and support measures. Project results and experiences will be translated into recommendations for a more demand-driven research agenda as well as long-term end-user materials to feed into the EIP-AGRI. AGRIFORVALOR thus delivers as mediator and facilitator new commercial opportunities for the agriculture and forest sector in Europe to become active partner in the sidestream biomass value chain.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.2.4-01 | Award Amount: 5.09M | Year: 2013

Seafood has been recognized as a high quality, healthy and safe food item. Yet, some seafood can accumulate environmental contaminants with potential impact on human health. Limited information is available for those without maximum limits set by authorities for seafood, like priority contaminants, biotoxins from harmful algal blooms and marine litter. In order to increase seafood safety to consumers and reduce human health risks, ECsafeSEAFOOD aims to assess safety issues mainly related to non-regulated priority contaminants and evaluate their impact on public health. ECsafeSEAFOOD addresses these objectives with eight work packages (WPs) targeting priority environmental contaminants, including biotoxins from harmful algal blooms and marine litter. WP1 will elaborate a database with relevant information required for risk assessment gathered from literature and national monitoring programmes. WP2 will monitor contaminants in seafood using an ambitious sampling strategy following the recommendations of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (Descriptor 9) and assess the effect of seafood processing/cooking on contaminants. In WP3, risk assessment (with data from WP1-2) and mitigation strategies will be implemented to reduce the impact of risky contaminants on human health. WP4 will develop fast screening/detection methods for relevant contaminants tailored to suit stakeholders needs to promote consumers confidence in seafood. WP5 will carry out the toxicological characterization of contaminated seafood in realistic conditions and will use alternative toxicological methods to provide tools for the risk assessment (WP3). WP6 will assess the links between the level of contaminants in the environment and that in seafood through controlled trials and case-study species, taking into account the effect of climate changes. WP7 details a strategy for education, training with clear and practical dissemination of results. WP8 will ensure efficient project management.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.2.2-2 | Award Amount: 7.81M | Year: 2012

The European population of older people with multiple chronic diseases (multimorbidity) is increasing steadily in tandem with the rising population of people aged 65 years. Older multimorbid people are at high risk of polypharmacy (PP), inappropriate prescribing (IP), adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and adverse drug events (ADEs). PP, IP, ADRs and ADEs in turn cause excessive drug costs and excess healthcare utilization; ADRs and ADEs also cause significant mortality. The current rapid rise in drug expenditure relating mostly to drug use by older people across Europe is not economically sustainable. In tandem with the drug therapy problems, there is underuse of non-drug therapies i.e. physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech & language therapy, nutritional therapy, psychotherapy in the treatment of chronic diseases in this cohort. Optimal management of drug and non-drug therapy in older multimorbid persons usually requires specialist skill, but most doctors who treat older people do not have specialist training in Geriatric Medicine. To address these challenges, we propose to design and build a software engine (SENATOR) with the capacity to optimize therapy and simultaneously minimize ADRs, IP, PP and excessive cost. SENATOR will evaluate drug indications and contraindications, ADR/ADE risk and detect IP using validated criteria. SENATOR will identify cheapest drug brands to minimize cost. SENATOR will also recommend appropriate symptom-focused drug therapy and avoidance of drugs unlikely to be beneficial in frailer older people with low one year life expectancy. In addition, SENATOR will provide specific advice on appropriate non-drug therapies for individual patients. To test SENATORs efficacy, we will perform a multicentre RCT involving 1800 older multimorbid patients hospitalized with acute illness under the care of specialists other than geriatricians, using ADR incidence, medication appropriateness and drug/healthcare costs as the main outcome measures.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2009-IRSES | Award Amount: 72.00K | Year: 2010

The prevalence of obesity has increased steadily for the past several decades. The great public health burden of overweight and obesity requires effective intervention programs targeting energy balance behaviours (e.g. active transport, tv viewing, soft drink and snacking consumption). However, up to now the efforts to prevent overweight had disappointing effects. To better inform future systematic intervention development and to improve effectiveness of energy balance behaviour interventions, identification of how the interventions worked (analyses of mediators) and for whom the interventions worked (analyses of moderators) is needed. Identifying mediators of intervention effects can prompt future intervention developers to strengthen or add effective intervention components and to remove ineffective intervention components resulting in more cost efficacious interventions. In addition, indentifying moderations can stimulate intervention developers can seek for new intervention strategies for non-responders. The aim of the proposed exchange program proposal is to bring the field of mediation and moderation analyses applied in obesity prevention research to a higher level by strengthening and enriching the international cooperation in this research field. All partners in the proposed exchange programme are experts in the field of overweight prevention and studies related to the determinants of overweight and unhealthy energy balance. Although all three partners are experts in the field of overweight prevention, each partner has specific expertise, which brings us to the goals of the current exchange programme. There are specific approaches and techniques that we can learn from each other and which can be further developed through an exchange programme. Eventually, this will bring our research field to a higher scientific level, which will have a direct impact on the overweight prevention and development of effective intervention programmes in Europe and Australia.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-3.3-1;HEALTH-2007-3.3-2 | Award Amount: 2.37M | Year: 2009

Health inequalities are currently regarded as one of the most important public health challenges in the EU. There is however not sufficient knowledge of what actions are effective to reduce the gradient in health inequalities. Tackling the Gradient aims to address this, to ensure that political momentum is maintained and that operational strategies can be developed to make progress on this issue. The focus of the research project will be on families and children, since the greatest impact on reducing the health gradient can be achieved through early life policy interventions and by creating equal opportunities during childhood and adolescence. This project involves the following components, which directly address the theme of the call: Develop a common Evaluation Framework that can be applied across the EU to assess and determine what works. Determine whether and why traditional public health and health promotion policy measures dont reach or fail to change behaviours amongst the more socially deprived groups. Explore some currently understudied protective factors (particularly the influence of social capital on children, adolescents and families) that could be important to tackling the health gradient. Identify what targeted and universal policy approaches to protect families and children from falling into poverty and ill health are currently being applied, and appear to be effective in tackling the health inequalities gradient Widely disseminate the outcomes and results to politicians and practitioners in the form of scientifically sound recommendations at the local, national and EU levels. The research will be undertaken by a consortium comprising of 34 members from 12 institutions across Europe. The work will be coordinated by EuroHealthNet, which has considerable expertise in managing EU projects in the area of health inequalities, and is well placed to feed research results into policy making processes at the national and EU level.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: RUR-10-2016-2017 | Award Amount: 2.00M | Year: 2016

SKIN is an ambitious initiative of 20 partners in 14 countries in the area of Short Food Supply Chains (SFSCs). It intends to systematise and bring knowledge to practitioners, promote collaboration within a demand-driven innovation logic and provide inputs to policymaking through links to the EIP-AGRI. SKIN will build and animate a community of about 500 stakeholders, with the strategic objective of setting up, at the conclusion of the project, a European association permanently working for the improvement of SFSCs efficiency and for the benefit of stakeholders and growth in the sector. The community will be built and animated around the identification of good practices in short supply chains across Europe. Partners will scout, analyse and classify a significant number of cases in different countries. Best practices (at least 100) will be systematised, processed into highly usable formats (including video and page-flows) and made accessible to stakeholders via the web (following the EIP AGRI formats) and through the set-up of regional nodes, to allow a deeper penetration of existing knowledge into practice. The work on good practices will also allow identifying key issues (hindrances or opportunities) around SFSCs. Such issues will be the main themes of 6 innovation challenges workshops the purpose of which is to stimulate stakeholders to propose new ideas for innovation based research or innovation uptake. These will be supported in a coaching phase where consortium partners deliver guidance to stakeholders for the full development of those innovative ideas. SKIN puts significant efforts in dissemination, to reach as many stakeholders as possible, and exploitation, to plan post projects developments in the form of a permanent association that would give continuity to the activities launched with the project (community expansion, circulation of good practices, promotion of research based innovation and linkages with the EIP and policy making instances).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: HEALTH-2007-3.4-2 | Award Amount: 473.33K | Year: 2009

Over recent decades, the possibilities for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease have expanded throughout the EU. As a result, health policy decision makers and public funders are faced with the challenge of making choices for health investments to improve the healthy life expectancy of Europeans within the context of constrained resources. Health investments include any new technology for the diagnosis, prevention or treatment of disease. It is not clear to which extent recent decisions on such health investments have been optimal. Public funders sometimes evaluate the impact of health investments, but there is a lack of standardised procedures and criteria. This is even more the case for investments related to screening and diagnosis of disease, and in particular gene technologies. The objectives of this study are: 1. to set up a set of common criteria (a tool) for the evaluation of health investments related to screening and diagnosis (HISD) in Europe, with a special focus on gene technologies; 2. to guide the better alignment of procedures between all (old and new) MS; and 3. to improve the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of future HISD. Literature reviews will identify existing methods for evaluating health investments and summarise existing procedures and criteria within member states (MS) for making and evaluating decisions on HISD. In parallel, stakeholders will be invited to participate in a survey allowing a better understanding of the commonalities and differences between MS. Based on this, a draft tool, comprising procedures and criteria for evaluating HISD will be proposed. The draft tool will be assessed by a panel of experts guiding its iterative development. A list of recent HISD in MS will then serve as subject for testing the practical applicability of the tool. Finally, ways for implementing the tool and for the evaluation of HISD in MS will be proposed together with recommendations and political implications at EU level.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2012.2.4.5-2 | Award Amount: 7.45M | Year: 2013

In chronic joint disease, only a subgroup of patients has classical autoantibodies, while the other variants are seronegative arthritis syndromes with a predominance of innate immune disturbances. These forms of joint diseases frequently show extra-articular manifestations of epithelial tissues like skin and gut. On the molecular level, innate immune activation and the release of damage associated molecular pattern proteins (DAMPs) of the S100 family are important mechanisms of initiation and perpetuation. Early diagnosis remains a significant problem, and prediction of disease extension and course is challenging. Despite all efforts we do not have therapies that alleviate the disease and protect from disease progression, damage and long-term disability. The identification of specific inflammatory mechanisms that correlate to patterns of disease characteristics would allow targeted therapeutic approaches. In a comprehensive research approach, MIAMI will establish relevant disease mechanisms and translate finding into novel biomarkers for individual adaptation of therapies (personalised medicine) for seronegative arthritis. Our research strategy leaves retracted ways of genetics and classical autoimmunity; instead we will focus on innate immunity and inflammation. The goals of MIAMI are ambitious and will be reached with cutting-edge research performed by the most excellent researchers in the field, who have been combined to form a multidisciplinary consortium. The choice of the scientific as well as industry partners was entirely based on excellence. Thus, MIAMI brings together the leading teams that are working on mechanisms of innate immunity in arthritis and mucosal inflammation. In summary, MIAMI will significantly contribute to progress on the key questions: Who will be affected by which disease manifestation or complication, how can we use this knowledge to identify the disease, and what will be a meaningful target to treat or even prevent deleterious outcome.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2008.2.2.1.2. | Award Amount: 10.98M | Year: 2009

The HERMIONE project is designed to make a major advance in our knowledge of the functioning of deep-sea ecosystems and their contribution to the production of goods and services. This will be achieved through a highly interdisciplinary approach (including biologists, ecologists, microbiologists, biogeochemists, sedimentologists, physical oceanographers, modelers and socio-economists) that will integrate biodiversity, specific adaptions and biological capacity in the context of a wide range of highly vulnerable deep-sea habitats. Gaining this understanding is crucial, because these ecosystems are now being affected by climate change and impacted by man through fishing, resource extraction, seabed installations and pollution. To design and implement effective governance strategies and management plans we must understand the extent, natural dynamics and interconnection of ocean ecosystems and integrate socio-economic research with natural science. The study sites include the Arctic, North Atlantic and Mediterranean and cover a range of ecosystems including cold-water corals, canyons, cold and hot seeps, seamounts and open slopes and deep-basins. The project will make strong connections between deep-sea science and user needs. HERMIONE will enhance the education and public perception of the deep-ocean issues also through some of the major EU aquaria. These actions, together with GEOSS databases that will be made available, will create a platform for discussion between a range of stakeholders, and contribute to EU environmental policies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME-AG | Phase: SME-2 | Award Amount: 3.79M | Year: 2008

Chocolate is a complex material, which can be damaged by means of bloom growth or cracking. This is a significant issue for filled products such as pralines or wafers. For SMEs and larger companies these problems can prevent the manufacture of products of sufficient quality. It is the aim of this project to study the phenomena of chocolate bloom and crack propogation in chocolate for filled sweets. The mechanisms will be studied and then ways in which these problems can be avoided will be developed. Demonstrators will be manufactured and training and information provided for the industry, including the writing of a technical manual.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-SICA | Phase: KBBE-2008-1-4-08 | Award Amount: 3.85M | Year: 2009

VALORAM aims at exploring and valorizing Andean soil microbial diversity for the development of alternative, efficient technologies and crop management practices to improve the sustainability and productivity of Andean cropping systems benefiting rural farming households. The project will focus on potato because of its global importance for small-scale farmers in the central Andean highlands. The participants will use metagenomic, genomic, proteomic and metabolomic analysis to identify novel traits of microorganisms and characterize beneficial soil microbial communities, to achieve the objective. The project specific aims are to (1) explore the agro-ecosystem functions of soil microbes in potato-based cropping systems and preserve the components of this microflora in international culture collections, (2) elucidate the role of rhizosphere microorganisms and communities in promoting plant growth, suppressing soil borne disease and priming plant biotic defenses, developing eco-efficient technologies/products for sustainable crop production systems, (3) develop applied technologies and knowledge-based systems to improve the sustainability and resilience of potato based cropping systems for the benefit of the indigenous farmers and (4) promote the exchange of scientific knowledge and technologies among partners and the LA scientific community to impulse research in this area and support the continuous development of crop production technologies. The strategy for VALORAM implementation is to engage LA and EU partners in developing and further stengthening collaborative research activities in order to sustainably improve potato-based systems. This is supported by a multidisciplinary team of experts with highly complementary skills and based on a robust management structure with an efficient workshop and communication programme. The results will directly benefit the local partners and may also contribute to increase the productivity of organic potato production in the EU.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2009-2-1-02 | Award Amount: 3.80M | Year: 2010

FoodRisC will characterise key configurations of food risk/benefit relationships and the consequent implications for risk communicators, make recommendations about the unique potential of new social media (e.g. social networks and blogging) and provide a systematic understanding of how consumers deal with food risk/benefit information. The FoodRisC consortium is comprised of experts in key fields relevant to food risk/benefit communication from research institutes, consumer organisations and SMEs in ten Member States. This consortium is supported by an Advisory Board of representatives from seven organisations of world renown in food risk/benefit communication (including EFSA, WHO and Google).The project will identify the barriers to communicating to consumers across Europe and identify key socio-psychological and socio-demographic characteristics, including gender, that affect food risk/benefit perceptions and processes as well as consumer preferences for communication channels. These objectives will be achieved through a range of research approaches and methods and by extending the theoretical basis of how people acquire and use information in food domains. The impact of the project will be at a European level and will be facilitated through the development of the FoodRisC toolkit together with practical guidance to enable the effective communication of coherent messages across the Member States. Use of the toolkit and guides will assist policy makers, food authorities and other end users in developing common approaches to communicating coherent messages to consumers in Europe. The effective spread of food risk/benefit information will assist initiatives aimed at reducing the burden of food-related illness and disease, reducing the economic impact of food crises and ensuring that confidence in safe and nutritious food is fostered and maintained in Europe.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2009-2-4-03 | Award Amount: 3.78M | Year: 2010

EU Directive 396/2005 states that methods are needed to account for cumulative and aggregate exposure in pesticides regulation . 27% of food samples had multiple residues in the 2006 EU residue monitoring report. The Eurobarometer shows pesticides are one of the principal worries of EU consumers regarding food safety. Industry needs clear criteria to decide on large investments in product development. The central aim of the ACROPLIS project is: to develop a framework for cumulative and aggregate risk assessment of pesticides in an understandable way, accessible for all actors involved in European risk assessment and management. ACROPOLIS will: 1) study the data needs, data availability and uncertainties for cumulative exposure and effect assessment in a probabilistic risk assessment framework; 2) integrate models describing various routes of exposure into an aggregate exposure model; 3) develop new toxicological approaches for identifying possible additive or synergistic effects and developing a strategy for refinement of cumulative assessment groups; 4) integrate cumulative and aggregate risk models including uncertainty analyses in a web-based tool, including accessible data for all stakeholders; 5) improve risk assessment strategies in Europe by analysing stakeholders attitudes, by training and by discussing the new methodology in several stakeholder conferences. The project brings together the key experts and models in Europe including dietary exposure MCRA, dermal and inhalation exposure ConsExpo, user exposure EUROPOEM and UK POEM, dose-response PROAST and risk characterisation IPRA. The new integrated model will be tested in case studies with conazoles and pyrethroids and validated with biomarker and duplicate diet studies. The model software will be tested in different countries to ensure its usability at the international level. Overall ACROPOLIS will advance the scientific foundation to meet policy needs, protect EU consumers and address their concerns.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: NMP-2008-4.0-9 | Award Amount: 4.26M | Year: 2009

In several applications of professional textiles and clothes mosquito repellency is an important issue. Two major problems arise: repellents currently in use are harmful, resistance to conventional repellents increases, and the lifetime of release systems is too short. Solving these two problems are the main goals of the NO BUG project. Novel biorepellents will be considered and evaluated as well as two release systems (multilayer coating and textile bioaggregates) in order to repel mosquitoes causing malaria or dengue. Novel release concepts are multilayer coatings and in situ release of the active compounds. Targeted prototypes are textiles for health workers and bed nets (mosquitoes). The project will study what are the best conditions of use of the biorepellents and how to integrate them in the textile products. Testing, exploitation and dissemination will be an active part of the work.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: REGIONS | Award Amount: 3.34M | Year: 2010

The European Commission has identified poor diets and low physical activity levels as health challenges wich should be adressed by actions across policy areas and engaging a range of public and private actors. Research points to a necessary link between nutrition and physical activity, but regional health economies need better collaboration between triple-helix actors to tap this potential. This project aims at developing a research agenda for reducing diet- and physical inactivity-related (chronic) diseases, such as diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular diseases and various types of cancer, by developing innovative products and services within the field of nutrition and physical activity. Instrumental for this is collaboration on a EU wide platform for new research and innovation in the combined field of healthy food and physical activity. The novelty lies in a multidisciplinary approach closing the gap between regional economic hotspots related to food and physical activity. Following this logic they chose the acronym AFRESH - activity and food for regional economies supporting health. Novel is also the fact that highly competitive RDCs undertake mentoring activities to help those to get on board where the collaboration within the triple-helix is insufficient. Finally, the project is novel in the actions which will be implemented: AFRESH Ideas research and product concepts and a Change Management Toolkit for mentoring regions.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE-2007-1-2-05 | Award Amount: 6.67M | Year: 2008

The challenges facing forest geneticists and tree breeders include recognition of changing demands on forests for a wider range of high value forest products and sustainability of forest ecosystems under climate change. NOVELTREE is designed to enable significant genetic improvement of tree characteristics and forest products properties to satisfy the needs (quality, quantity, sustainability, vulnerability) of the forest-based sector and consumers. NOVELTREE will: i) Provide a list of morphological and physiological traits relevant as selection criteria for pest tolerance, sustainable biomass production, wood properties for present and future use and plastic response to climate change ii) Identify functional allelic polymorphisms for a suite of traits of interest in a post-genomics approach to improve selection efficiency and monitor genetic variation along the selection process iii) Develop high throughput phenotyping and genotyping tools. These new tools will allow earlier genetic evaluation, higher selection intensity, increased accuracy in genetic prediction and better monitoring of genetic diversity along generations iv) Develop novel/improved breeding strategies and demonstrate their efficiency in case studies. Demonstration will focus on model tree species of high economic importance in different European regions: Maritime Pine, Scots Pine, Spruce, and Poplar v) Assess the financial and environmental impacts of genetically improved trees at stand and landscape levels thanks to a multidisciplinary approach and simulation tools vi) Provide tree breeders and forest owners with support decision tools for optimal deployment of improved genetic stocks in both prevailing and future climate, and under risk of pest and disease attacks vii) Provide training in emerging technologies in connection with on-going European projects, disseminate the results to different publics and transfer technology to the forest-based sector


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CPCSA | Phase: INFRA-2011-1.2.2. | Award Amount: 5.16M | Year: 2011

OpenAIREplus will build a 2nd-Generation Open Access Infrastructure by significantly expanding in several directions the outcomes of the OpenAIRE project, which implements the EC Open Access (OA) pilot. Capitalizing on the OpenAIRE infrastructure, built for managing FP7 and ERC funded articles, and the associated supporting mechanism of the European Helpdesk System, OpenAIREplus will develop an open access, participatory infrastructure for scientific information. It will significantly expand its base of harvested publications to also include all OA publications indexed by the DRIVER infrastructure (more than 270 validated institutional repositories) and any other repository containing peer-reviewed literature that complies with certain standards. It will also generically harvest and index the metadata of scientific datasets in selected diverse OA thematic data repositories. It will support the concept of linked publications by deploying novel services for linking peer-reviewed literature and associated data sets and collections, from link discovery based on diverse forms of mining (textual, usage, etc.), to storage, visual representation, and on-line exploration. It will offer both user-level services to experts and non-scientists alike as well as programming interfaces for providers of value-added services to build applications on its content. Deposited articles and data will be openly accessible through an enhanced version of the OpenAIRE portal, together with any available relevant information on associated project funding and usage statistics. OpenAIREplus will retain its European footprint, engaging people and scientific repositories in almost all 27 EU member states and beyond. The technical work will be complemented by a suite of studies and associated research efforts that will partly proceed in collaboration with different European initiatives and investigate issues of intellectual property rights, efficient financing models, and standards.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP-SICA | Phase: KBBE.2010.1.3-01 | Award Amount: 12.38M | Year: 2011

Livestock production efficiency is impaired by helminth infection which is ubiquitous in cattle, sheep and goats world-wide. It causes severely debilitating gastro-intestinal, respiratory and hepatic disorders, dependent on the infecting species. The treatment and prevention of helminth parasitism in livestock continues to rely almost exclusively on the use of anthelmintic drugs, an approach threatened by the global emergence of anthelmintic resistance. An alternative approach is vaccination. Members of the present consortium (from the EU and Switzerland, North and South America, North and South Africa, Australia, 2 SMEs and 1 major animal health company) have developed prototype vaccines with the predicted required efficacy to control major gastro-intestinal nematode infections of livestock, notably Ostertagia ostertagi in cattle and Haemonchus contortus in sheep, the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica in sheep and cattle with leading positions in subunit vaccine development against Cooperia onchophora, Dictyocaulus viviparus in cattle and the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus in dogs. This proposal aims to deliver at least one prototype vaccine to the point of uptake by the commercial sector or through government/philanthropic agencies and this will be addressed by 1) Developing effective native or synthetic vaccines, the latter using novel, molecular expression systems. 2) Defining the protective immune responses induced by these vaccines to order to optimise the structure of the antigens and the method of their delivery. 3) Defining vaccine efficacy with trials in both housed and grazing livestock 4) Providing a platform for training and knowledge exchange which includes participation in training programmes, short exchanges of staff, workshops,and web site provision. 5) Interacting closely with computer modellers, the animal health industry, farmer organisations and other stakeholders to define required vaccine characteristics. 6) Knowledge exchange/dissemination to policy makers, scientists, government departments and the general public.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-2.3.2-1 | Award Amount: 3.26M | Year: 2008

Although HIV-1 Nef was originally named negative factor, it has been shown to be critical for efficient persistance of HIV-1 infected humans thus playing a major role in the progression to AIDS. Remarkably; until now Nef has not been evaluated as an antiretroviral drug target. It is well established that Nef promotes HIV-1 replication and facilitates viral immune evasion by interacting with various host factors. Disrupting these essential interactions may delay or even prevent disease progression. Partners in this consortium have already identified small molecule inhibitors targeting Nef function. The first objective of this project is therefore to validate the molecular events elicited by these molecules in both virus-free as well as in HIV infection in vitro assays. In a complementing approach, small compound libraries already available to the consortium will be used and adapted to screen for inhibitors of Nef induced modulation of cellular receptors, NFAT activation and the Nef SH3 binding domain, that likely contribute to the importance of Nef in HIV-1 pathogenicity. In addition, functional screenings to discover drugable cellular Nef partners using RNA interference libraries will be performed. After validation of their importance in relation to the established host proteins co-interacting in the Nef cellular pathways, a selection will be additionally targeted by the developed small molecule inhibitors. Our ultimate goal is to deliver a complementary portfolio of candidate drugs that target the most important parameters in the Nef-host interaction pathway. Critical cellular interaction partners are much more conserved than viral enzymes that are usually targeted in highly-active-antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Therefore, it is believed by the partners that the novel approach presented in this project proposal will yield compounds less likely to be subject to the occurrence of drug resistance


Healthspan (the life period when one is generally healthy and free from serious disease) depends on nature (genetic make-up) and nurture (environmental influences, from the earliest stages of development throughout life). Genetic studies increasingly reveal mutations and polymorphisms that may affect healthspan. Similarly, claims abound about lifestyle modifications or treatments improving healthspan. In both cases, rigorous testing is hampered by the long lifespan of model organisms like mice (let alone humans) and the difficulty of introducing genetic changes to examine the phenotype of the altered genome. We will develop C. elegans as a healthspan model. Already validated extensively as an ageing model, this organism can be readily modified genetically, and effects of environmental manipulations on healthspan can be measured in days or weeks. Once validated as a healthspan model, it can be used for an initial assessment of preventive and therapeutic measures for humans, as well as for risk identification and the initial evaluation of potential biomarkers. It will also prove useful to study interactions between genetic and various environmental factors.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.09M | Year: 2012

Eye research has often blazed a trail for other disciplines to follow, giving a lead in neuroscience, genetics, the development of gene- and stem-cell therapies and other important areas of medical research. In recent years, geneticists have made many remarkable discoveries of relevance both to normal human vision and the development of inherited retinal pathology. However the genes and mutations identified account for only a proportion of cases of inherited retinal degeneration, and recent discoveries hint at new classes of mutations which are either largely undetected or the significance of which is missed by conventional genetics. In addition, for those genes implicated there often remains a black box between mutations and disease; how do defects in a given protein manifest symptoms in the eye and what underlies the huge variation in symptoms, severity and response to treatment? The objectives of EyeTN are twofold; to address these knowledge gaps through cutting edge research using novel techniques, including transcriptomics analyses, whole genome and single target RNAi, the development of animal and cell-based disease models, stem cell biology, bioinformatics and hands on experience of pharmaceutical research with direct translational targets; and to give the next generation of European ophthalmic researchers unparalleled opportunities to train with a consortium of the best inherited blindness research labs in the world. The Network spans academic, healthcare and commercial research sectors and is already well established with many existing collaborations. All fellows will carry out one or more components of their research and training in a commercial environment and attend a workshop on translating ideas and discoveries into commercially viable Bioscience produces and therapies, fostering an entrepreneurial mindset and ensuring that we train a pool of researchers who are able to communicate effectively with both academic and commercial bioscience colleagues.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.81M | Year: 2015

The main goal of this project is to train the next generation of experts on the Caspian region in order to establish, and make sustainable, a network of excellence. This will be achieved through an integrated PhD programme on the Caspian that boosts the researchers theoretical, empirical and administrative skills, a thing that will make them extremely competitive for employment in both academic and non-academic sectors but also confident and knowledgeable enough to start their own projects. The training will enhance the research skills of the ESRs while also giving them a first-hand experience with a partner operating in a different environment, thus learning how to apply their skills to different fields and sectors. We expect our network and training to become a leading voice on issues related to the Caspian region both in academia and other sectors.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.79M | Year: 2015

Algal aquaculture is developing exponentially worldwide, with multiple applications in the food, chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Current research in algal biotechnology mostly focuses on metabolite discovery, aquaculture yield improvement and engineering bottlenecks. However, agronomical experience shows that controlling the interaction of land crops with mutualistic or pathogenic microbes is most critical to successful production. Likewise, controlling the microbial flora associated with algae (the algal microbiome) is emerging as the biggest biological challenge for their increased usage. Bacteria can control the morphogenesis of algae, while others are indispensable to algal survival. Pathogens are causing devastating diseases, the impact of which worsens with the intensification of aquaculture practices. Thus, the overarching aim of ALFF is to train 15 ESRs (researchers and technologists) within a multinational consortium, whilst bringing a scientific step-change in our understanding of these interactions, leading to the development of superior mass algal cultivation and biocontrol strategies. ALFF tackles: 1) the identification, taxonomy and utilisation of naturally-occurring algal symbionts and pathogens; 2) inter- and intra-species signalling and chemical ecology in aquaculture, natural environment and simplified systems (i.e. axenic cultures \/- symbionts); 3) and harnesses state of the art genomics, molecular, and biochemical techniques to characterise these interactions. A highly interdisciplinary team underpins an ambitious theoretical, field, hands-on training and research program. With the support of high profile institutions, ALFF foresees an exceptionally broad range of dissemination and outreach initiatives to help policy makers and the general public better understand the opportunities and issues relating to the sustainable use of our aquatic freshwater and marine resources, within and beyond the EU.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME | Phase: SME-1 | Award Amount: 1.05M | Year: 2010

This proposal aims to provide a technological platform for SMEs to develop and progress further knowledge on the successful use of nutritional additives to reduce methane (CH4) emissions from ruminants: SMEthane. CH4 is the second most important greenhouse gas, after CO2. At a global scale, livestock farming contributes up to 18% of total greenhouse gas emissions. The inhibition of CH4 formation by ruminants has long been an objective of ruminant nutritionists, but a number of barriers to the development of novel dietary additives have been identified. SMEthane is designed to remove the restriction that SMEs face in successfully developing and marketing novel compounds, in particular plant extracts. We will establish research and development platforms to allow SMEs to determine: the means of delivery of such compounds in the diet, knowledge of the dose response curve for such compounds under different production systems, the persistence of the inhibitory effect of such compounds on CH4 production over long periods of time and the potential side effects such as change in flavour of the final animal product. SMEthane Research Consortium combines the capabilities of five major research and educational organizations from 4 European countries plus 6 enterprises with long experience in developing nutritional additives. The governance structure of the project has been established to ensure effective direction and management that maximizes the expertise and facilities available at each RTD to better meet SMEs needs. Training and dissemination plan considered within SMEthane aim to provide training for the SME sector and its customer through different workshops based in key areas relevant to the development and usage of novel dietary additives to decrease CH4 emissions. An Exploitation and Dissemination Team will be responsible for decisions on knowledge management issues such as patenting, licensing and other exploitations of the project results.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-IRSES | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-IRSES | Award Amount: 858.90K | Year: 2013

The proposed European-US and South American network IMCONet will advance climate and (eco-) system change research at the Western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP), a region of recent rapid aerial warming. WAP glaciers contribute to global sea level rise, and functioning and services of coastal ecosystems are massively threatened by the fast regional warming. Data sets from recent interdisciplinary European-South American field work within ESF-IMCOAST (PolarCLIMATE April 2010-March 2013) and from the Jubany scientific core programme at King George Island (KGI) will be connected and cross-validated with southern stations on WAP: the US Palmer and the British Rothera station. Links with both stations and program leaders (Ducklow, CU, New York, US (formerly at MBL Woods Hole,US); and Meredith, NERC-BAS, Cambridge, UK) have been established in IMCOAST. IMCONet objectives are A) to develop predictive climate change and ecosystem models for the whole WAP coastal environment based on existing data sets and data exchange policies, B) transfer of knowledge between partner countries to enhance collaboration with high quality long-term measuring programs at all 3 stations, to fill present measuring gaps. This will solidify the basis for the prediction of climate change effects in the South. The proposed consortium consists of 16 institutional partners across 10 countries with 85 travelling scientists. Ten partners already collaborate successfully as EU and associated teams in ESF-IMCOAST, and IMCONet will be coordinated by the same PI (Abele, AWI). Whereas ESRs are seconded mostly for longer training and collaboration periods, exchange of ERs will also foster joint teaching in the partner countries and collaboration in future science projects. The concept of IMCONet is to strengthen European engagement in Antarctic climate change research, as complementing approach to the major EU focus in the Arctic. It will sustain ongoing European Antarctic research in a future network with competent South American partners.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP-SICA | Phase: HEALTH-2009-4.3.2-1 | Award Amount: 3.64M | Year: 2010

Adolescents in Latin America are confronted with serious sexual and reproductive health problems. Besides the negative physical effects, poor sexual and reproductive health brings about social threats for adolescents. The CERCA project aims to contribute to the global knowledge about how health systems could be more responsive to the sexual and reproductive health needs of adolescents and by extension to the other health needs of their populations. In a first phase the determinants for sexual and reproductive health for adolescents will be analysed in research settings in three Latin American cities: Cochabamba in Bolivia, Cuenca in Ecuador, and Managua in Nicaragua. Subsequently a comprehensive strategy for community-embedded interventions will be developed that targets at improved access to adolescent-friendly reproductive health care in primary health services, a supporting and enabling environment and strengthened adolescent competence to make reproductive health choices. A strong emphasis will be put on the use of media (internet and text message on mobiles) to reach adolescents for empowering actions. The strategy will be implemented and tested on its impact and applicability. The analysis of the implementation processes and the evaluation results will help to develop a framework for community-embedded interventions that improve the responsiveness of health systems to health needs. Community-participatory action research will be the main methodology for the development of the intervention strategy and the framework. A randomised control and a quasi experimental study will be used for the impact evaluation. Policy makers will be continuously involved in the research project as a part of the project strategy to bridge the gap between health research and health policies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EINFRA-2-2014 | Award Amount: 13.13M | Year: 2015

OpenAIRE2020 represents a pivotal phase in the long-term effort to implement and strengthen the impact of the Open Access (OA) policies of the European Commission (EC), building on the achievements of the OpenAIRE projects. OpenAIRE2020 will expand and leverage its focus from (1) the agents and resources of scholarly communication to workflows and processes, (2) from publications to data, software, and other research outputs, and the links between them, and (3) strengthen the relationship of European OA infrastructures with other regions of the world, in particular Latin America and the U.S. Through these efforts OpenAIRE2020 will truly support and accelerate Open Science and Scholarship, of which Open Access is of fundamental importance. OpenAIRE2020 continues and extends OpenAIREs scholarly communication infrastructure to manage and monitor the outcomes of EC-funded research. It combines its substantial networking capacities and technical capabilities to deliver a robust infrastructure offering support for the Open Access policies in Horizon 2020, via a range of pan-European outreach activities and a suite of services for key stakeholders. It provides researcher support and services for the Open Data Pilot and investigates its legal ramifications. The project offers to national funders the ability to implement OpenAIRE services to monitor research output, whilst new impact measures for research are investigated. OpenAIRE2020 engages with innovative publishing and data initiatives via studies and pilots. By liaising with global infrastructures, it ensures international interoperability of repositories and their valuable OA contents. To ensure sustainability and long-term health for the overall OpenAIRE infrastructure, the proposed OpenAIRE2020 project will establish itself as a legal entity, which will manage the production-level responsibilities securing 24/7 reliability and continuity to all relevant user groups, data providers and other stakeholders.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: ENV.2010.4.1.4-1 | Award Amount: 1.20M | Year: 2010

Inclusion of all Balkan countries into GEO and their contribution to GEOSS is of great importance, since only a comprehensive EO framework can lead to better understanding and more intelligent utilization of the environmental resources, increased quality of life and faster economic development. The importance and benefits from participation in global EO initiatives have already been recognized by several Balkan countries. However, a great number of Balkan countries are still not members of GEO. This project aims to identify existing EO-data providers and users in the wider Balkan region, to determine their status, potentials and needs, and to coordinate EO players by establishing proper interfaces and networking between them. A broad analysis of gaps and complementarities of EO activities within the region will be performed, with the emphasis on user needs in the specific context of the Balkan region. The consortium has been carefully constituted to include key players both from EO-data provider and EO-data user communities, from all Balkan countries. Participants from other EU countries are also included to allow straightforward identification of mechanisms for leveraging, developing and coordinating EO capacity building initiatives in the region, and to ensure that the Project outcomes will be in line with the currently designed Shared Environmental Information System and with Infrastructure for Spatial Information in Europe. Main outcomes of the Project will be the creation of a permanent web-based networking facility, and the design of roadmaps and recommendations for an active, coordinated and sustained participation of all Balkan countries in global EO initiatives. These outcomes will also present a contribution to GEO task CB-09-03 Building Institutional Capacity to Use EO and specifically to subtask CB-09-03b Establishing Regional Capacity Building Networks.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2010.2.1.4-1 | Award Amount: 9.23M | Year: 2010

FunDivEUROPE (FUNctional significance of forest bioDIVersity in EUROPE) proposes to quantify the effects of forest biodiversity on ecosystem function and services in major European forest types in the main bioclimatic regions of Europe. FunDivEUROPE will be based on four scientific platforms and seven cross-cutting Work Packages. The project will combine a global network of tree diversity experiments (Experimental Platform) with a newly designed network of observational plots in six focal regions within Europe (Exploratory Platform). Additionally, the project will integrate an in-depth analysis of inventory-based datasets of existing forest monitoring networks to extend the scope to larger spatial and temporal scales (Inventory Platform). FunDivEUROPE will thus combine the strengths of various scientific approaches to explore and quantify the significance of forest biodiversity for a very large range of ecosystem processes and ecosystem services. Using modeling and state-of-the-art techniques for quantitative synthesis, the project will integrate information gained from the different platforms to assess the performance of pure and mixed species stands under changing climate. In addition to the three research platforms, FunDivEUROPE will set up a Knowledge Transfer Platform in order to foster communication, aggregation and synthesis of individual findings in the Work Packages and communication with stakeholders, policy makers and the wider public. The information gained should thus enable forest owners, forest managers and forest policy makers to adapt policies and management for sustainable use of forest ecosystems in a changing environment, capitalizing on the potential effects of biodiversity for ecosystem functioning. The experiences gained within FunDivEUROPE will finally allow contributing to the development of the European Long-Term Ecosystem Research Network, complementing existing forest observation and monitoring networks.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2013.2.6-01 | Award Amount: 2.57M | Year: 2013

CARODEL aims to valorise the results from the previous FP7 COLORSPORE project, in which initial isolation and characterization work was performed on Bacillus strains producing gastric-stable carotenoids. As the stability in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), antioxidant activity and bioavailability of particular Bacillus carotenoids was shown to be higher than those of common dietary carotenoids, the conclusions from COLORSPORE provided strong and compelling reasons to support further development and commercialisation of these bacteria-derived carotenoids. CARODEL will therefore focus on the development of an efficient oral delivery strategy of such highly active carotenoids, in combination with evaluation of potential direct health-beneficial (probiotic) activity of the Bacillus delivery vehicle, with the ultimate aim to improve biomarkers associated with (the prevention of) cardiovascular disease (CVD). The relevance of using carotenoids for CVD prevention was recently shown by a positive EFSA opinion on the use of tomato lycopene for maintenance of a healthy blood flow. In practice, effective delivery of the carotenoids to the human body will be compared upon administration as i) vegetative Bacillus cells, ii) Bacillus spores or iii) extracted carotenoids. In parallel, the ability of the Bacillus strain to exert bona fide effects (i.e., effects on the host microbiota, metabolism and immunity) will be investigated using in vitro gut models and in vivo rat studies. Based on this, the best delivery strategy will be selected and validated in a human study, in which carotenoid bioavailability will be validated as well as endpoints related to CVD biomarkers and potential probiotic activity. In combination with a full safety assessment, a proof-of-concept production strategy and development of a business plan, the scientific evidence compiled in this project will provide a framework for efficient further commercialisation of a well-documented Bacillus carotenoid product


This proposal aims at developing a versatile fermentation platform for the conversion of lipid feed stocks into diverse added-value products. It is proposed to develop the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica into a microbial factory by directing its versatile lipid metabolism towards the production of industrially valuable compounds like wax esters (WE), polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), free hydroxyl fatty acids (HFAs) and isoprenoid-derived compounds (carotenoids, polyenic carotenoid ester). Conversion of lipid intermediates into these products will be achieved by introducing heterologous enzyme functions isolated from marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria into Yarrowia. To achieve these goals we have assembled a team with a broad set of complementary expertise in microbial physiology, metabolic engineering, yeast lipid metabolism, metagenomics, biochemical and protein engineering. Already available for this project are a number of genetically engineered Yarrowia strains as well as a collection of genes encoding enzymes for the production of WEs, 3-HFAs, PHAs and carotenoids. The following complementary research focus areas are proposed: (1) Engineering of metabolic precursor pools in Yarrowia lipolytica for the production of added-value products from lipids (INRA, UGe). (2) Conversion of metabolic precursor pools in Yarrowia to added-value products by overexpressing heterologous biosynthetic enzymes (UGe, INRA, UoM). (3) Discovery and characterization of novel aliphatic enzyme activities by metagenomic screening of marine hydrocarbonoclastic and other oil- and fat-metabolizing microbial communities (TUBS, UoN). The project is further complemented by: (i) the activity of a professional valorization company (Ascenion) providing IP protection and commercialization services; (ii) by proactive efforts to expand the projects target products application potential (Avecom).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-01b-2014 | Award Amount: 10.52M | Year: 2015

SAPHIR aims to develop vaccine strategies effective against endemic pathogens responsible for high economic losses in livestock in order to strengthen the profitability of food animal systems, improve animal welfare and reduce xenobiotic usage in farming with a One Health perspective. SAPHIR will bring novel vaccine strategies to the market i) at short term, with several promising vaccines brought to demonstration (RTL6), ii) at long term, with cutting edge strategies brought at proof of concept (RTL3) and iii) in line with socio-economic requirements. SAPHIR has selected two representative pathogens of pigs (Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae), chickens (Eimeria and Clostridium perfringens) and cattle (Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Mycoplasma bovis) to develop generic vaccine approaches applicable to other pathogens. SAPHIR will issue i) knowledge of immune mechanisms of protection, ii) affordable, safe and multivalent vaccines with DIVA properties, iii) efficient adjuvants targeting dendritic cells, optimal formulations, new mucosal and skin delivery systems, a new generation of DNA vectors and viral replicon platforms for fostering an earlier and longer duration of immunity including the perinatal period, and iv) basal biomarkers of individual immuno-competence for future breeding strategies. The SAPHIR dissemination and training programme includes creation of an integrated health management website, launch of a Global Alliance for Veterinary Vaccines and organization of workshops directed at food animal system stakeholders. This will ensure optimal research translation of SAPHIR outputs to market and field applications. SAPHIR brings together interdisciplinary expertise from fourteen academic institutes including a Chinese partner, five SMEs and two pharmaceutical companies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-12-2014 | Award Amount: 8.82M | Year: 2015

Euromix aim to develop an experimentally verified, tiered strategy for the risk assessment of mixtures of multiple chemicals derived from multiple sources across different life stages. The project takes account of the gender dimension and balances the risk of chemicals present in foods against the benefits of those foods. Important concepts for this new strategy are prioritisation criteria for chemicals based on their exposure and hazard characteristics and evaluation of the role of mode of action in grouping chemicals into cumulative assessment groups. In-silico and in-vitro tools will be developed and verified against in-vivo experiments, with focus on four selected endpoints (liver, hormones, development and immunology) to provide a full proof-of-principle. The EuroMix project will result in an innovative platform of bioassays for mixture testing and refined categorisation of chemicals in cumulative assessment groups. New hazard and exposure models will be embedded in a model toolbox, made available for stakeholders through an openly accessible web-based platform. Access to the web-based tools will be facilitated by training. Criteria will be set and guidance will be written on how to use and implement the tiered test strategy. Dissemination and harmonisation of the approach within EU, Codex Alimentarius, and WHO will be achieved by involving a.o. WHO and US-EPA in the project and by the participation of experts playing a key role in helping establish international food safety policies. It is expected that the new mechanism-based strategy, the bioassay platform, the openly accessible web-based model toolbox, and clear guidance on a tiered hazard and exposure test and risk assessment strategy will boost innovation in the public and private sector, provide a sound scientific basis for managing risks to public health from chemical mixtures, ultimately reduce the use of laboratory animals, and support the global discussion of risk assessment policies for mixtures.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: Fission-2010-3.2.1 | Award Amount: 7.04M | Year: 2011

Diagnostic radiation represents an indispensable, sometimes life-saving, tool in modern medicine. However, the growing use of computerized tomography (CT) is a topic of concern in radiological protection, especially for children and adolescents. Children are generally more sensitive to the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation than adults. In addition, they have a longer life-span to express any effect and, because of their smaller mass, they may receive higher radiation doses from a CT scan than an adult. A large-scale multinational collaborative study will be set up with the objective of providing guidance towards optimisation of doses from paediatric CT scans. We have the following specific aims: 1) describe the pattern of use of CT in different countries and over time; 2) derive individual estimates of organ doses ; 3) assess biological markers of CT-irradiation effects; 4) directly evaluate radiation-related risk of cancer following CT; and 5) characterize the quality of CT images in relation to the estimated doses in order to better inform CT imaging practice. Scientists from nine European countries with expertise in epidemiology, clinical practice, radiology, dosimetry, biology and public health will contribute to the project with the objective of provide recommendations for a harmonized approach to CT dose optimisation for paediatric patients in Europe. Results of this research will serve to increase awareness of the scientific and medical communities about public health aspects related to the use of diagnostic radiation and to provide recommendations on the use of valuable diagnostic tools, with lowering the risk of its potential hazards as much as possible.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: MG-4.1-2014 | Award Amount: 22.99M | Year: 2015

The specific challenge for waterborne transport call MG4.1 is, To support developments that make new and existing vesselsmore efficient and less polluting. A sound way to support developments is, to demonstrate solutions that are sufficiently close to market so that ship owners will consider these in their future investment plans. Following this reasoning LeanShips will execute 8 demonstration actions that combine technologies for efficient, less polluting new/retrofitted vessels with end users requirements. Demonstrators were selected for their end-user commitment (high realisation chance), impact on energy use/emissions, EU-relevance, innovativeness and targeted-TRL at the project end. Selected technologies (TRL3-4 and higher) address engines/fuels/drive trains, hull/propulsors, energy systems/emission abatement technologies. Technologies are demonstrated mostly at full-scale and evidence is provided on energy and emission performance in operational environments. The LeanShips partnership contains ship owners, shipyards and equipment suppliers, in total 48 partners from industry (81%) and other organisations. Industry has a leading role in each demonstrator. Target markets are the smaller-midsized ships for intra-European waterborne transport, vessels for offshore operations and the leisure/cruise market. First impact estimates show fuel saving of up to 25 %, CO2 at least up to 25%, and SOx/NOx/PM 10-100%. These estimates will be updated during the project. First market potential estimates for the LeanShips partnership and for markets beyond the partnership are promising. Project activities are structured into 3 layers: Basis layer with 8 focused demonstrators (WP 04-11), Integration layer with QA, Innovation Platform and Guide to Innovation (WP02), Dissemination and Market-uptake (WP03), and top Management layer (WP01), in total 11 Work Packages. The demonstrators represent an industry investment of ca. M 57, the required funding is M 17,25.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.3.3-03 | Award Amount: 7.40M | Year: 2012

BIOINTENSE is directed at addressing the challenges of low productivity and process intensity frequently hampering the implementation of bioprocesses in industry. For the future of the next generation of chemical processes in Europe it provides the opportunity not only to address intensification but also to enable this in a rapid manner. BIOINTENSE will make use of -technology to develop economically feasible intensified processes by integration of separation and process control, and to create tools to speed up the characterization and assessment of different process options and technologies and biocatalysts for increased process intensity. A strong focus lies in increasing the scale of biocatalytic and cascade reactions and to improve the fundamental factors that affect the economic feasibility. Both numbering up and scale-up methodologies will be tested. The BIOINTENSE consortium is ideally suited to address the challenges in KBBE.2012.3.3-03 and to meet the objectives, as it spans across disciplines, academia and industry: SMEs with a strong technology base in the areas of integrating separation in bioprocessing, biocatalyst development, immobilization, -reactor fabrication, and on-line monitoring will ensure top of the line industry focused research with a strong focus on scale-up and implementation. There is an urgent need for these challenges to be overcome to move towards a European Knowledge Based BioEconomy to exploit the environmental savings and economic potential if such bioprocesses were in place. Building on the recent advances in molecular biology, the time is now right to develop the necessary process engineering methodologies and implementation strategies to unlock the full potential of bioprocesses.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: Fusion-2007-7.1 | Award Amount: 2.48M | Year: 2008

This aim of the FUSENET project is the establishment of a European Fusion Education Network (FUSENET) for education in fusion science and technology, as part of a comprehensive package of coordination actions, in order to increase, enhance, and broaden fusion training and education activities in Europe. The project consists of eleven focused work packages, with a total proposed budget of 2,000,000 . The project brings together a broad representation of the European fusion community with 36 participants from 18 countries, of which 22 Universities and 14 Euratom Associations. The project consists of four groups of coordination actions: the establishment and running of the FUSENET network; development of individual learning opportunities and common educational goals; development of educational materials and hands-on experiments; and funding of joint educational activities. The FUSENET project will cover all education levels, from secondary school through Bachelor and Master level, to PhD. The actions of FUSENET build upon the already strongly coordinated European Fusion Research programme, coor-dinated under the European Fusion Development Agreement EFDA. The network will be given a permanent identity by the establishment of the FUSENET Association, which will provide a platform for the coordination of existing actions, the initiation, development and implementation of new EU-wide actions, and for the exchange and dissemination of fusion education information. The envisioned concrete end result of the FUSENET project is an integrated fusion education system in Europe, with strong links between fusion institutes and higher education institutes. Through a central website, the pro-gramme will offer a transparent structure of coherent educational actions, accessible and inviting, in which stu-dents and teachers can easily find their way to a variety of attractive ways to participate in the fusion research programme.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 3.31M | Year: 2012

Aim of the CAFFEIN network is to provide 10 early stage researchers (ESRs) and 2 exprerienced researchers (ERs) with excellent training in an industry relevant area of cancer research, complementary skills required for pharmaceutical industry, and knowledge in setting up biomedical start-up companies. To this end, the network comprises two full industrial partners: the established pharmaceutical company Medimmune, a global leader in immunopharmaceuticals, and the small biotech company Gimmune, which used breakthrough results in nanotechnology to establish a new enterprise. The research focus of CAFFEIN, which stands for Cancer Associated Fibroblasts (CAF) Function in Tumor Expansion and Invasion, is to understand the mechanisms, how fibroblastoid cells support tumor progression and metastasis formation. CAF biology is therefore rather complex, but the research groups of the CAFFEIN network cover many different aspects of it, thus having a critical mass to provide relevant training in this area. Training in complementary skills important for work in the pharmaceutical industry is provided by the industrial partner MedImmune, where communication with management, industrial project planning, IPR, etc. will be taught. Entrepreneurial skills, business plans, funding by venture capitalists, and patentability of research findings are highlights of the training provided by the industrial partner Gimmune. All this training is transmitted to the ESRs/ERs by networkwide events, secondments and tight research collaboration. Taken together, the CAFFEIN research training network combines the acquisition of excellent scientific knowledge in an area highly attractive for pharmaceutical industry with special education in relevant complementary skills that increase employment chances of the trained researchers in industry and that encourage them to translate their scientific results into products, thus improving health and economic welfare of European citizens.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.2.2-01 | Award Amount: 7.65M | Year: 2012

The main objective of the BACCHUS project is to develop tools and resources that will facilitate the generation of robust and exploitable scientific evidence that can be used to support claims of a cause and effect relationship between consumption of bioactive peptides and polyphenols, and beneficial physiological effects related to cardiovascular health in humans. To achieve this, the BACCHUS consortium has assembled 12 leading Research & Technological centres and 16 SMEs (with ca 30% of the EC requested contribution allocated to the SMEs). BACCHUS thus contains SMEs directly involved in developing food products and pursuing health claims, experts in health claims legislation and the EFSA review process, and academic and industry partners who provide high quality food and health research that can underpin health claims. Existing SME-developed products that have clear potential for obtaining favourable opinions for health claims have been selected as test cases for study. These have been aligned with a series of work-packages each of which addresses key aspects of the EFSA health claim evaluation process (legislation and dossiers; product/bioactive characterisation; habitual intakes; bioavailability; mechanisms and biomarkers; clinical trials evidence of health benefit) that will deliver tools, processes and high quality original science. Scientific results and best practice guidelines will be made publically available and thus support future claims for industry. The scope and completeness of the existing bioactive database (eBASIS) that includes both compositional and biological effects data will be extended and developed as a sustainable tool with various training materials. All outcomes will be disseminated broadly by direct engagement with SMEs via an existing European SME association, with stakeholders via seminars, newsletters and press releases, as well as through traditional scientific routes (high quality publications, and conference presentations).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-32-2014 | Award Amount: 3.00M | Year: 2015

This proposal addresses the call topic Advancing bioinformatics to meet biomedical and clinical needs (PHC-32-2014), with the focus on the standardization, dissemination and meta-analysis of cell migration data. Cell migration is the fundamental process in medically highly relevant topics, including morphogenesis, immune function, wound healing, and cancer metastasis, and the study of cell migration thus has a direct impact on major clinical applications, especially regarding personalized treatment and diagnosis. Over the last few years, cell migration research has benefited enormously from advances in methodology and instrumentation, allowing multiplexing and multi-parameter post-processing of cell migration analyses to become widely used. As cell migration studies have thus de facto become both a high-content as well as a high-throughput science, an urgent yet largely unmet bioinformatics need has emerged in the form of intra- and inter-lab data management solutions, standardization and dissemination infrastructure, and novel approaches and algorithms for meta-analysis. The central goal of this project is therefore to construct a comprehensive, open and free data exchange ecosystem for cell migration data, based on the development of extensible community standards and a robust, future-proof repository that collects, annotates and disseminates these data in the standardized formats. The standards and repository will be supported by freely available and open source tools for data management, submission, extraction and analysis. Importantly, we will also demonstrate the application of large-scale integrative data analysis from cell migration studies through two proof-of-concept studies: guiding personalized cancer treatment from patient organoids, and providing patient-specific diagnosis based on peripheral blood leukocyte motility. This work will also establish the foundation for a cell migration science-based ELIXIR Node.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE.2013.1.2-06 | Award Amount: 597.34K | Year: 2013

International trade is increasing tremendously in recent years with a lot of import and export material going in and out of the European Union. Within this context there is also the increasing risk of importing unwanted organisms via this trade. Organisms include plant pests and pathogens, some of which may be on the quarantine list of the European Union. Also climate change may increase the ability of plant pests to survive regions other than those of their origin. Within the field of Plant Health a decline in taxonomic and phytosanitary experience has become eminent in the last decade; also relevant phytosanitary collections are under pressure. This will affect all members of the EU and other nations as well. To regulate and control plant pathogens there is an increasing need for efficient and reliable identification and detection tools. For their development and validation, good and well maintained collections containing relevant species are indispensable. A significant number of plant pest collections are still present within Europe but they are dispersed, widespread and of very variable quality. NPPOs, mandated laboratories, universities and research institutes all have their own collections related to their specific work and scope. Many of these collections are connected to a single specialist. Within Europe there is a need to improve the infrastructure supporting phytosanitary important collections so as to more efficiently use the available infrastructure and improve collaboration in the field of phytosanitary infrastructure with regard to means, knowledge, expertise on taxonomy, development of detection methods and collections of phytosanitary important organisms. The main outputs to be disseminated from the project will include an inventory on characteristics of phytosanitary important collections within Europe and guidelines to improve quality standards and access and to design and build sustainable networks of reference collections.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH-2007-5.1-01 | Award Amount: 1.76M | Year: 2008

By concentrating on hybrid, not strictly normative social situations, we consider how people experiment with novel forms of citizenship that modify the outlines of formal citizenship. Such forms of citizenship imply practical activities connected to existing set-ups or milieus, and what is at stake is the continuous invention of the democratic principle itself, i.e. the right to rights . The task at hand is to affirm and implement the right to the city , not immediately conceded, that we call profane citizenship, and that we intend to use as a means of analyzing democratic ownership. Our research program aims to examine in what ways the practices of actors who find themselves in situations where they have to make do with their faults, handicaps, lack of resources, are taken (or not) into account as alternatives to juridical citizenship. We will focus on milieus of translation gathering the have-some people acting in solidarity networks. Three interconnected fields are concerned (languages and codes, proofs of identity, tests of urbanity), leading to qualitative surveys whose materials and first results will be submitted with sensing methodology to professional and institutional representatives. This in turn will lead us to reconsider the notion of profane citizenship with an eye to the recent transformations of democracy in various national frameworks, by concentrating not only on the juridical concepts of citizenship, but also on its sociological configurations. The theoretical and experimental contribution expected from this research project aims to develop the notion of profane citizenship, showing how it allows, in situations of delicate or relative balance, to take into account, according to the different national and democratic political cultures, both the uniqueness of the personal actions they imply and the political ontology involved thereby.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP.2013.1.1-1 | Award Amount: 11.92M | Year: 2014

To meet short term European 20-20-20 objectives and long term targets of European Energy Roadmap 2050, an energy paradigm shift is needed for which biomass conversion into advanced biofuels is essential. This new deal has challenges in catalyst development which so far hinders implementation at industrial level: Firstly, biomass is much more complex and reactive than conventional feedstock; secondly development of such catalysts is traditionally done by lengthy empirical approaches. FASTCARD aims at: -Developing a novel rational design of nano-catalysts for better control; optimised based on advanced characterisation methods and systematic capture of knowledge by scalable mathematical and physical models, allowing prediction of performance in the context of bio-feedstocks; -Developing industrially relevant, insightful Downscaling methodologies to allow evaluation of the impact of diverse and variable bio-feedstocks on catalyst performance; -Addressing major challenges impacting on the efficiency and implementation of 4 key catalytic steps in biobased processes: Hydrotreating (HT) and co-Fluid Catalytic Cracking forming the pyrolysis liquid value chain for near term implementation in existing refining units as a timely achievement of the 20-20-20 objectives: addressing challenges of selectivity and stability in HT; increased bio-oil content in co-FCC. Hydrocarbon (HC) reforming and CO2 tolerant Fischer Tropsch (FT) forming the gasification value chain for longer term implementation in new European relevant infrastructure, representing 100% green sustainable route for Energy Roadmap 2050: addressing challenges of stability and resistance in HC reforming; stability and selectivity for FT. Advances in rational design of nano-catalysts will establish a fundamental platform that can be applied to other energy applications. The project will thus speed-up industrialisation of safer, greener, atom efficient, and stable catalysts, while improving the process efficiency.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: HEALTH.2011.3.4-1 | Award Amount: 3.69M | Year: 2012

In 2008 an estimated 13 million induced abortions were conducted in China. Induced abortions are associated with a high risk of injury or long-term physical and psychological morbidity and a heavy social and economic burden. Most abortions occur in cities and the epidemic affects young and unmarried women as well as rural-to-urban migrant women. The large number of abortions is primarily due to contraceptive failure or no use of contraception. The Chinese Family Planning (FP) program focuses mainly on birth control among married couples and the services are provided by an independent FP system. Young and unmarried women including rural-to-urban migrant women are less likely to access professional FP services. Abortion is a commonly used way to end unwanted pregnancy, however, post-abortion family planning services are often lacking in hospital settings. The INPAC project consortium proposes to integrate post-abortion family planning services into existing abortion services in hospital settings in China and to evaluate the effectiveness of the interventions in terms of reduction of unwanted pregnancies and repeat abortions. Based on the project findings, policy recommendations on health system organization aiming to improve equitable access to reproductive healthcare and FP service will be developed. Context-specific interventions will be developed based on a situation analysis of the effects of the current FP policy and a feasibility assessment of the integration approach. The proposed interventions will be implemented in 30 divisions of mainland China and evaluated with regard to its effectiveness. The project will contribute to standardize the post-abortion family planning services and decrease the long-term costs related to abortion in China. The results of this research will also be of interest to other countries with high abortion rates.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2011-1.1.13. | Award Amount: 9.12M | Year: 2011

TREES4FUTURE will make a significant contribution to helping the European forestry sector respond, in a sustainable manner, to increasing demands for wood products and services (among which preservation of forest biodiversity) in a context of changing climatic conditions. To do so TREES4FUTURE will integrate for the first time major, yet rarely interacting forestry communities (and their resources) from geneticists to environmentalists and from communities working at the tree/population scale to those working at forestry landscape/wood basin levels as well as industry concerns. These scientific communities will combine their complementary infrastructures, tools and knowledge and thus fill in the current gaps 1) physical environment vs genetics, 2) basic wood properties vs end-products quality and 3) individuals to forests scales of study. This collaboration will result in a holistic approach integrating abiotic and biotic environmental aspects through biological responses (eco-physiological and pest/disease risk studies), biomass production (breeding and silviculture) and industrial technology (wood quality and technology). The long-term objective of TREES4FUTURE is to provide not only the partners but the whole European forestry community, with an easy and comprehensive access to complementary but currently scattered sources of information and expertise to optimise the short and long-term exploitation of the forest resources by both the research community and the socio-economic players. Providing access to the wider research community to a wide variety of forestry research infrastructures (from state-of-the-art analytical tools to predictive models) via the project will enable TREES4FUTURE to improve, coordinate and validate its offer to the European and International researchers from both public and private sectors and thus ensure the future sustainability of the consortium as well as that of the wider European Forestry community at large.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP-SICA | Phase: KBBE-2009-2-5-01 | Award Amount: 7.58M | Year: 2010

VEG-i-TRADE provides platforms to identify impacts of anticipated climate change and globalisation on food safety, microbiological and chemical hazards, of fresh produce and derived food products. Control measures of managerial and technological nature will be developed in the supply chain of crop production, post-harvest processing and logistics to minimize food safety risks. The assessment of the performance of horticultural safety management systems by a novel diagnostic instrument at EU level exemplified by several countries in Europe and tailored on a global level including major EU trade partners from various climate zones will lead to recommendations on European and global level on quality assurance and the setting of science-based performance objectives. VEG-i-TRADE will pro-actively invest in problem solving technologies for safe produce investigating aspects of water quality and water treatment, horticultural production practices, disinfection treatment and packaging technologies. These control measures will be exploited in collaboration with SMEs and industrial partners. Baseline studies on the hazards, intervention technologies and best practices in the fresh produce chain will provide input for both microbial and chemical risk assessment to elaborate support to risk-based sampling plans, evaluate the risks of newly identified threats as affected by the global trade system and anticipated climate change. The project output will craft a discussion forum for stakeholders in the global food chain reflecting on issues of acceptable risk, sustainability of fresh produce production and long term strategy of international food trade, while making no compromise in food safety for European consumers and in respectation of food sovereignty. Risk communication to increase awareness of trade partners production systems and the uneven consumer behaviour will provide key conditions for prioritisation of risk management strategies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE-2008-1-4-01 | Award Amount: 4.14M | Year: 2009

Development of accurate identification tools for plant pathogens and pests is vital to support European Plant Health Policies. For this project Council Directive 2000/29/EC is important, listing some 275 organisms for which protective measures against introduction into and their spread within the Community needs to be taken. Those threats are now greater than ever because of the increases in the volumes, commodity types and origins of trade, the introduction of new crops, the continued expansion of the EU and the impact of climate change. Currently identifying pathogens (in particular new emerging diseases) requires a staff with specialised skills in all disciplines (mycology, bacteriology, etc.); which is only possible within big centralised laboratory facilities. Taxonomy, phytopathology and other fields which are vital for sustaining sound public policy on phytosanitary issues are threatened with extinction. Modern molecular identification/detection techniques may tackle the decline in skills since they often require much less specialist skills to perform, are more amenable for routine purposes and can be used for a whole range of different target organisms. Recently DNA barcoding has arisen as a robust and standardised approach to species identification. QBOL wants now to make DNA barcoding available for plant health diagnostics and to focus on strengthening the link between traditional and molecular taxonomy as a sustainable diagnostic resource. Within QBOL collections harbouring plantpathogenic Q-organisms will be made available. Informative genes from selected species on the EU Directive and EPPO lists will be DNA barcoded from vouchered specimens. The sequences, together with taxonomic features, will be included in a new internet-based database system. A validation procedure on developed protocols and the database will be undertaken across worldwide partners to ensure robustness of procedures for use in a distributed network of laboratories across Europe


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: AAT.2012.1.4-2. | Award Amount: 30.14M | Year: 2012

Future aero engines will need to be more efficient and contribute to the reduction on environmental impact of air transportation. They must reach some standards of performance by reducing emissions and creating some savings on operation costs. EIMG consortium has launched since several years some initiatives to develop future engines in the frame of the European Committee research programmes. Within different project such as DREAM, VITAL, NEWAC or LEMCOTEC, EIMG is ensuring the development of innovative technologies in order to further reduce the fuel burn, emissions and noise. In order to ensure the technological breakthrough, future aero-engines will have higher overall pressure ratios (OPR) to increase thermal efficiency and will have higher bypass ratios (BPR) to increase propulsive efficiency. These lead to smaller and hotter high pressure cores. As core engine technologies have been addressed in the previous project, E-BREAK project will ensure the mandatory evolution of sub-systems. It is indeed required for enabling integration of engine with new core technologies to develop adequate technologies for sub-systems. E-BREAK will aim to adapt sub-systems to new constraints of temperature and pressure. The overall picture of these initiatives bring all technology bricks to a TRL level ensuring the possibility to integrate them in a new aero engines generation before 2020. In its 2020 vision, ACARE aims to reduce by 50% per passenger kilometer CO2 emissions with an engine contribution targeting a decrease by 15 to 20% of the SFC. NOX emissions would have to be reduced by 80 % and efforts need to be made on other emissions. E-BREAK will be an enabler of the future UHOPR integrated engine development, completing efforts done in previous or in on-going Level 2 programs.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2012-2.2.5. | Award Amount: 4.12M | Year: 2012

MIRRI will be a pan-European distributed RI providing microbiological services, thus facilitating access to high quality microorganisms, their derivatives and associated data for research, development and application. It will connect resource holders with researchers and policy makers to deliver the resources and services more effectively and efficiently to meet the needs of innovation in biotechnology. The RI builds upon 60 microbial domain resource centres (BRCs) in 26 European countries; collectively they provide access to more than 350,000 strains of microorganisms. Microorganisms provide essential raw material for biotechnology - but to date less than 1% of the estimated number of species are described and available to be harnessed by man. As new species are discovered, expertise is difficult to locate to ensure correct identification. Public sequence databases provide modern tools for identification but the information is often of poor quality and often not backed up by the biological material to enable validation of data. The current fragmented resource distributed across Europe needs to be coordinated and operated to common standards with facilitating policy to help focus activities to the big challenges in healthcare, food security, poverty alleviation and climate change. Lacking infrastructure, policy framework and governance structures will be defined in the preparatory phase, as will be the links to researchers and policy makers. Specialist clusters will address priority issues and output steering. BRCs should be placed on national road maps, ensuring the pan-European strategy can be implemented. Cross discipline interactions with other RIs will lead to new approaches. Linking the microbial strain information to other relevant data will allow their full exploitation. Appropriate data mining solutions will enable focussing acquisition and delivery strategies, thus bridging current gaps and improving user access.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2013.3.6-01 | Award Amount: 11.70M | Year: 2013

The Nano3Bio project convenes a consortium of world renowned experts from 8 EU universities, 1 large company, and 14 SME, to develop biotechnological production systems for nanoformulated chitosans. Chitosans, chitin-derived polysaccharides varying in their degree of polymerisation (DP), degree of acetylation (DA), and pattern of acetylation (PA), are among the most versatile and most promising biopolymers, with excellent physico-chemical and material properties, and a wide range of biological functionalities, but their economic potential is far from being exploited due to i) problems with reproducibility of biological activities as todays chitosans are rather poorly defined mixtures, and ii) the threat of allergen contamination from their typical animal origin. The Nano3Bio project will overcome these hurdles to market entry and penetration by producing in vitro and in vivo defined oligo- and polymers with controlled, tailor-made DP, DA, and PA. Genes for chitin synthases, chitin deacetylases, and transglycosylating chitinases/chitosanases will be mined from different (meta)genomic sources and heterologously expressed, the recombinant enzymes characterized and optimized by protein engineering through rational design and molecular evolution, e.g. targeting engineered glycosynthases. These enzymes and genes will be used for in vitro and in vivo biosynthesis in microbial and microalgal systems, focusing on bacteria and diatoms. The bioinspired chitosans will be formulated into biomineralised hydrogels, nanoparticles, nanoscaffolds, etc., to impart novel properties, including by surface nano-imprinting, and will be bench-marked against their conventional counterparts in a variety of cell based assays and routine industrial tests for e.g. cosmetics and pharma markets. The process will be accompanied by comprehensive life cycle assessments including thorough legal landscaping, and by dissemination activities targeted to the scientific community and the general public.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: KBBE.2010.3.5-01 | Award Amount: 3.95M | Year: 2011

BIOTREAT brings together six research institutions and four SMEs to develop much-needed water treatment biotechnologies for removing pesticides, pharmaceuticals and other organic micropollutants from contaminated drinking water resources. These biotechnologies will be developed into prototype biofilter systems ready for subsequent commercialisation. The biofilters will contain non-pathogenic pollutant-degrading bacteria, with the bacteria being immobilised on specific carriers to ensure their prolonged survival and sustained degradative activity. Through beyond state-of-the-art research, BIOTREAT will ensure that these novel water treatment biotechnologies are highly transparent, reliable and predictable. Two complementary biotreatment strategies will be followed, one based on metabolic processes whereby the bacteria completely mineralise specific micropollutants and the other based on cometabolic degradation utilising the ability of methane- and ammonium-oxidising bacteria to unspecifically degrade a range of micropollutants for which specific degraders are not yet available. The biofilter systems will be carefully validated through cost-benefit analysis and environmental life cycle assessment. A road map will be drawn up for post-project exploitation, including individual SME business plans. Effective dissemination of the BIOTREAT results will be ensured by close collaboration with an End-user Board comprised of representatives from waterworks, water authorities, industry, etc. In addition to bringing considerable advances to water treatment biotechnology, the main outcome of BIOTREAT will thus be prototype biofilter systems (metabolic and cometabolic) ready for commercialisation in a number of highly relevant water treatment scenarios, including existing sand filters at waterworks, mobile biofilters placed close to groundwater abstraction wells, sand barriers between surface waters and abstraction wells, and protective barriers in aquifers.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME | Phase: SME-2013-1 | Award Amount: 1.49M | Year: 2013

As SMEs in the supply chain of small Wind Turbines (WTs), we have identified an excellent opportunity in the urban submarket. The Small Wind market mainly corresponds to turbines installed in rural and isolated areas. Nevertheless, Urban is by far the largest potential market, as 80% of European population lives in cities and the EU Directive 2010/31/EU on Energy Performance of Buildings requires that Member States shall ensure that by 31 December 2020 all new buildings are nearly zero-energy buildings. This is an exciting commercial opportunity, which yet needs to cope with technical challenges related to the peculiarities of Urban Wind regime. The low wind speed and turbulent flows makes the achievement of Wind energy cost effectiveness more difficult in urban areas. The Proposed Technological Solution WINDUR proposes a small vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) optimised for use in urban environments as a roof-top mounted system. Proposed novel developments include (1) a variable speed control system developed to maximise VAWTs energy yield under rapidly changing wind speeds, (2) an aerodynamic design based on a helical rotor, refined for reducing rotor weight and loads on the roof, to lower WINDUR installation complexity and cost and (3) an assessment of wind resource in urban areas, for characterising those locations with better wind resources. WINDUR has a targeted performance of 0,35kWh/ at an annual average wind speed of 6,5 m/s for guaranteeing a Return on Investment (ROI) period shorter than 15 years. Potential Impact for the Consortium members WINDUR aims to develop solutions that contribute to give a competitive advantage to European SMEs in the supply chain of small wind turbines. WINDURs consortium of SMEs include suppliers of WT components, a WT manufacturer, a WT installer and a wind resource consultancy. We intend to use extensive knowledge and technical capabilities in European RTDs to enforce the development of Small Wind.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.1.2-1 | Award Amount: 16.16M | Year: 2010

Cancer is hallmarked by multiple genetic aberrations that lead to a functional derangement of cellular signalling networks. Embryonal tumours (ETs) comprising neuroblastoma, medulloblastoma and Ewing sarcoma, occur early in life, and thus may reveal pathogenetically relevant lesions clearer than adulthood tumours which carry passenger mutations accumulated during life. ASSET will exploit this fact by focussing on unravelling the signalling networks and their alterations in ETs. The basic hypothesis is that ETs share common pathogenetic principles that can be captured and made accessible to rational analysis by combining high-throughput and high content analysis of the genome, transcriptome and proteome with mathematical modelling. ASSET builds on a previous FP6 consortium, the European Embryonal Tumour Pipeline (EEPT), which generated high-throughput genomic and transcriptomic data on ETs. ASSET is the next logical step to add crucial functional information that will allow us to generate (i) defined in vitro and in vivo tumour systems; (ii) combined analysis of genomic mutations, transcriptome, miRNA expression and dynamic proteome changes; (iii) systematic perturbations; (iv) mathematical modelling to elucidate pathogenetic networks and their emergent behaviour; (v) the virtuous cycle of model validation in relevant biological model systems and clinical samples towards a major goal. This goal is to identify mechanistically understood network vulnerabilities that can be exploited for new approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of major paediatric tumours. Elucidating such core mechanisms will (i) improve understanding of and therapeutic options for these devastating childhood malignancies and (ii) enable a rational approach to deal with the complexity of the pathogenesis of adulthood cancers.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: ENV.2008.2.2.1.1. | Award Amount: 8.64M | Year: 2009

The increasing pressures upon the marine realm call for a well planned approach of further spatial development of this area. An ecosystem-based approach to fisheries, the increasing demand for sustainable energy, coastal defence systems, building materials and safe transport routes and the need to protect marine habitats and species all compete for the same valuable space. At the same time climate change will alter the composition and functioning of marine ecosystems, calling for a robust approach of future spatial planning that also takes cross boundary developments into account. MESMA will supply innovative methods and integrated strategies for governments, local authorities, stakeholders and other managerial bodies for planning and decision making at different local, national and European scales. This will also comprise an easy accessible information system to gain support from politicians, stakeholders and the public in general for difficult (inter)national decisions that will be needed for sustainable use and protection of this vulnerable area. This data system, containing information on the distribution of marine habitats and species, economic values and benefits and human uses and its effects will also be an interface between science, policy and decision makers. MESMA will supply strategic tools for sustainable development of European seas and coastal areas. The major challenge is to combine an optimized use with a sustained ecosystem of high quality, taking into account ecological and economic differences. By studying and comparing different national situations and solutions from a selected number of sites throughout Europe and by determining common features and differences, including the socio-economic settings and requirements, an integrated toolbox that can be applied throughout Europe will be made available.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2011.2.4-02 | Award Amount: 7.58M | Year: 2012

Total Diet Studies (TDS) allow getting information on real dietary exposure to food contaminants consumption (heavy metals, mycotoxins, POPs...) and estimating chronic exposure to pesticide residues in food and food additives intake. TDS consider total exposure from whole diets and are based on food contamination as consumed rather than contamination from raw commodities, thus ensuring a realistic exposure measure. TDS facilitate risk assessment (RA) and health monitoring (HM). Some EU Member States (MS) and Candidate Countries (CC) have no TDS programme or use various methods to collect data, which were not examined yet to tell whether they are comparable or not. This is of interest for EFSA or WHO-FAO. Similarly it is important to harmonise methods to assess dietary exposure risks in MS, CC and at the European level compared with other world regions. The methods proposed will aim for food sampling, standard analytical procedures, exposure assessment modelling, priority foods and selected chemical contaminants consistency across MS and CC. Various approaches and methods to identify sampling and analyses will be assessed and best practice defined. Contaminants and foods which contribute most to total exposure in European populations will be defined. Priority will be given to training and support in EU MS and CC currently without TDS. It will demonstrate best practice in creating a TDS programme using harmonised methods in regions previously lacking TDS, and ensure consistency of data collected. A database will be set up describing existing EU studies and collating harmonised exposure measures and designed to allow risk assessors and managers handling dietary exposure more accurately and more specifically. TDSEXPOSURE will spread excellence in TDS throughout stakeholders and establish a legacy of harmonised methods for sampling and analysis, and science-based recommendations for future global studies.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-CSA-Infra | Phase: INFRA-2010-1.1.11 | Award Amount: 11.85M | Year: 2011

AQUAEXCEL will coordinate the highest class European aquaculture research facilities covering the entire range of production systems (recirculation, flow-through, cage, hatchery and pond systems), environments (freshwater and marine, cold and warm water), scales (small, medium and industrial scale), fish species (salmon, trout, sea bass, sea bream, cod, carp), and fields of expertise (nutrition, physiology, health and welfare, genetics, monitoring and management technologies and engineering). AQUAEXCEL will: - Link and coordinate key research infrastructures in Europe: cage, recirculation and hatchery aquaculture systems, land and sea based, fresh and salt water installations in order to create the basis for synergistic research projects - Provide research teams with access to a wide range of the state-of-the-art infrastructures covering all important aquaculture species, systems, environments and expertises - Increase resource sharing and standardization between partners, notably but not exclusively for fish models and experimental methods developed in-house - Stimulate innovation through transfer of knowledge, harmonisation and development of best practices across fields of research, production systems and species - Execute joint research and development activities designed to improve the services currently provided by the infrastructures (remote access and monitoring, more accurate performance evaluation, limitation of live animals use, applicability of results at industry scale, development of biological models). - Bridge the gap between the scientific community and the industry through stimulation of problem-based research and enhanced knowledge transfer AQUAEXCEL will facilitate a coherent development of the aquaculture research facilities for which there is a strong demand from the public and private sectors of aquaculture research, which have to work towards sustainable production of high quality seafood with reduced environmental impact.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: KBBE.2011.2.3-02 | Award Amount: 2.11M | Year: 2012

The FoodManufuture project will perform a Conceptual Design Study in order to provide the basis for decision making for a European Food Manufacturing Research Infrastructure. The Research Infrastructure will aim at boosting competitiveness and innovativeness of the food manufacturing sector through cutting-edge research, dedicated and involving knowledge transfer, and motivating education. The project will involve stakeholders from industries, academia, and public and private decision makers from the food sector and the production technologies sector in order to meet the needs of SMEs and large companies of both sectors in a cross-disciplinary approach, to provide a clear European dimension, and to create ownership of the content of the final Conceptual Design Report. The consortium is based on, but not restricted to, wide-spread networks of public and private stakeholders from the ETPs Food for Life and MANUFUTURE. Joining forces of the food sector and the manufacturing solutions sector, sharing, aligning, combining and defining challenges and solutions will be much more efficient than done separately, as has been the situation until now. In a bottom-up process the stakeholders will create cutting-edge visions for the sector regarding manufacturing technologies, food chain management, sustainability, business models, technology transfer and education. The visions will be analysed. Available solutions and gaps will be identified. Based on the identified solutions and gaps, models will be elaborated and validated. The final Conceptual Design Report will present the most promising models for the new research infrastructure, the technical and economic figures and propose optional funding solutions. The dissemination programme including the involvement of stakeholders at national and European level from the two sectors will promote that the final Conceptual Design Report will be awaited and that stakeholders will be motivated to implement it.


News Article | November 7, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

As mammals evolve, so do mammalian viruses. In doing so, they develop creative and effective ways to counter and evade the antiviral responses of their mammal hosts’ immune systems. Researching those mechanisms at the molecular level can reveal key insights into the principles of such strategies relevant to therapy development. An international team of scientists, led by prof. Savvas Savvides of the VIB Inflammation Research Center at Ghent University, set out to do just that. By zooming in on GIF — a protein secreted by the virus that causes Orf, or ‘thistle disease’ — they unraveled viral molecular strategies to counter the mammalian immune system. Their findings, published in Nature Communications, provide the basis for developing antiviral therapies and for exploiting the potency of viral proteins to tweak the human immune system to counter inflammatory diseases and cancer. Orf disease is highly contagious and causes painful scabby lesions on the lips and nostrils of animals such as sheep, goats and other livestock. As a zoonotic disease, it can also be transmitted to humans. In fact, Orf is in the top 20 most important viral diseases affecting the rural poor in developing countries — especially in economies that depend heavily on animal farming and agriculture. Although seldom fatal, the disease not only potentially leads to high mortality rates in young animals and children when lesions make it impossible for them to eat; lesions can also impact livestock reproduction and make infected hosts vulnerable to other infections. It is clear that determining just how the virus goes about its infectious business is of major socioeconomic significance. Coordinated by prof. Savvas Savvides from VIB-Ghent University and spearheaded by Dr. Jan Felix, an international team of scientists rose to the challenge of shedding light onto how Orf cripples the mammalian immune system. The aim? To obtain structural and mechanistic information through an integrative structural biology approach on how GIF — one of the proteins secreted by the Orf virus — inactivates two key cytokines of the host immune system: IL-2 and GM-CFS. Both proteins play key roles in cell signaling and immune system regulation. Prof. Savvides (VIB-Ghent University) said, “Our approach involved the use of various methods in the spirit of integrative structural biology, including x-ray crystallography and electron microscopy, combined with biochemical and biophysical studies. To achieve this, we worked closely with colleagues from France, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands. In addition, much appreciated research funding from national and international agencies, as well as access to specialized facilities at the European level proved to be crucial for our research.” Prof. Savvides (VIB-Ghent University) said, “We investigated GIF because we are intrigued by how viruses use specialized proteins to change the immune system’s response. What we discovered was surprising: it is very rare that one viral protein can target two different host proteins to dodge the immune response, yet this functional duality is exactly what characterizes GIF. Most surprising was the finding that GIF uses its structure in distinct ways to target the cytokines IL-2 and GM-CSF with high affinity.  Remarkably, GIF’s structure does not look anything like the natural receptors of the cytokines it targets, yet it is able to mimic their ability to bind to IL-2 and GM-CSF to prevent the normal functions of the two cytokines. A scary feat!” Prof. Savvides (VIB-Ghent University) said, “By unveiling how GIF works, we have taken an important step towards understanding the molecular virtuosity that viral proteins develop as they evolve, and how they interact with their hosts’ immune systems. As our research moves forward, we would like to consolidate our findings. This, in turn, may help us use viral protein structures, like GIF, to target human proteins in a therapeutic context to combat inflammatory diseases and cancer.”


News Article | January 6, 2016
Site: www.rdmag.com

CERN, found success in a simple idea: Invest in a laboratory that no one institution could sustain on their own and then make it accessible for physicists around the world. Astronomers have done the same with telescopes, while neuroscientists are collaborating to build brain imaging observatories. Now, in Trends in Plant Science on January 5, agricultural researchers present their vision for how a similar idea could work for them. Rather than a single laboratory, the authors want to open a network of research stations across Europe--from a field in Scotland to an outpost in Sicily. Not only would this provide investigators with easy access to a range of different soil properties, temperatures, and atmospheric conditions to study plant/crop growth, it would allow more expensive equipment (for example, open-field installations to create artificial levels of carbon dioxide) to be a shared resource. "Present field research facilities are aimed at making regional agriculture prosperous," says co-author Hartmut Stützel of Leibniz Universität Hannover in Germany. "To us, it is obvious that the 'challenges' of the 21st century--productivity increase, climate change, and environmental sustainability--will require more advanced research infrastructures covering a wider range of environments." Stützel and colleagues, including Nicolas Brüggemann of Forschungszentrum Jülich in Germany and Dirk Inzé of VIB and Ghent University in Belgium, are just at the beginning of the process of creating their network, dubbed ECOFE (European Consortium for Open Field Experimentation). The idea was born last February at a meeting of Science Europe and goes back to discussions within a German Research Foundation working group starting four years ago. Now, they are approaching European ministries to explore the possibilities for ECOFE's creation. In addition to finding financial and political investment, ECOFE's success will hinge on whether scientists at the various institutional research stations will be able to sacrifice a bit of their autonomy to focus on targeted research projects, Stützel says. He likens the network to a car sharing service, in which researchers will be giving up the autonomy and control of their own laboratories to have access to facilities in different cities. If ECOFE catches on, thousands of scientists could be using the network to work together on a range of "big picture" agricultural problems. "It will be a rather new paradigm for many traditional scientists, but I think the communities are ready to accept this challenge and understand that research in the 21st century requires these types of infrastructures," Stützel say. "We must now try to make political decision makers aware that a speedy implementation of a network for open field experimentation is fundamental for future agricultural research."


News Article | November 7, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

As mammals evolve, so do mammalian viruses. In doing so, they develop creative and effective ways to counter and evade the antiviral responses of their mammal hosts' immune systems. Researching those mechanisms at the molecular level can reveal key insights into the principles of such strategies relevant to therapy development. An international team of scientists, led by prof. Savvas Savvides of the VIB Inflammation Research Center at Ghent University, set out to do just that. By zooming in on GIF -- a protein secreted by the virus that causes Orf, or 'thistle disease' -- they unraveled viral molecular strategies to counter the mammalian immune system. Their findings, published in Nature Communications, provide the basis for developing antiviral therapies and for exploiting the potency of viral proteins to tweak the human immune system to counter inflammatory diseases and cancer. Orf disease is highly contagious and causes painful scabby lesions on the lips and nostrils of animals such as sheep, goats and other livestock. As a zoonotic disease, it can also be transmitted to humans. In fact, Orf is in the top 20 most important viral diseases affecting the rural poor in developing countries -- especially in economies that depend heavily on animal farming and agriculture. Although seldom fatal, the disease not only potentially leads to high mortality rates in young animals and children when lesions make it impossible for them to eat; lesions can also impact livestock reproduction and make infected hosts vulnerable to other infections. It is clear that determining just how the virus goes about its infectious business is of major socioeconomic significance. Coordinated by prof. Savvas Savvides from VIB-Ghent University and spearheaded by Dr. Jan Felix, an international team of scientists rose to the challenge of shedding light onto how Orf cripples the mammalian immune system. The aim? To obtain structural and mechanistic information through an integrative structural biology approach on how GIF -- one of the proteins secreted by the Orf virus -- inactivates two key cytokines of the host immune system: IL-2 and GM-CFS. Both proteins play key roles in cell signaling and immune system regulation. Prof. Savvides (VIB-Ghent University): "Our approach involved the use of various methods in the spirit of integrative structural biology, including x-ray crystallography and electron microscopy, combined with biochemical and biophysical studies. To achieve this, we worked closely with colleagues from France, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands. In addition, much appreciated research funding from national and international agencies, as well as access to specialized facilities at the European level proved to be crucial for our research." Prof. Savvides (VIB-Ghent University): "We investigated GIF because we are intrigued by how viruses use specialized proteins to change the immune system's response. What we discovered was surprising: it is very rare that one viral protein can target two different host proteins to dodge the immune response, yet this functional duality is exactly what characterizes GIF. Most surprising was the finding that GIF uses its structure in distinct ways to target the cytokines IL-2 and GM-CSF with high affinity. Remarkably, GIF's structure does not look anything like the natural receptors of the cytokines it targets, yet it is able to mimic their ability to bind to IL-2 and GM-CSF to prevent the normal functions of the two cytokines. A scary feat!" Prof. Savvides (VIB-Ghent University): "By unveiling how GIF works, we have taken an important step towards understanding the molecular virtuosity that viral proteins develop as they evolve, and how they interact with their hosts' immune systems. As our research moves forward, we would like to consolidate our findings. This, in turn, may help us use viral protein structures, like GIF, to target human proteins in a therapeutic context to combat inflammatory diseases and cancer."


News Article | January 5, 2016
Site: phys.org

Testing the genetic potential of crops requires field experimentation with a large number of genotypes, like here in the BRIWECS project (http://www.briwecs.de/) on winter wheat. Credit: C. Lichthardt The Large Hadron Collider, a.k.a. CERN, found success in a simple idea: Invest in a laboratory that no one institution could sustain on their own and then make it accessible for physicists around the world. Astronomers have done the same with telescopes, while neuroscientists are collaborating to build brain imaging observatories. Now, in Trends in Plant Science on January 5, agricultural researchers present their vision for how a similar idea could work for them. Rather than a single laboratory, the authors want to open a network of research stations across Europe—from a field in Scotland to an outpost in Sicily. Not only would this provide investigators with easy access to a range of different soil properties, temperatures, and atmospheric conditions to study plant/crop growth, it would allow more expensive equipment (for example, open-field installations to create artificial levels of carbon dioxide) to be a shared resource. "Present field research facilities are aimed at making regional agriculture prosperous," says co-author Hartmut Stützel of Leibniz Universität Hannover in Germany. "To us, it is obvious that the 'challenges' of the 21st century—productivity increase, climate change, and environmental sustainability—will require more advanced research infrastructures covering a wider range of environments." Stützel and colleagues, including Nicolas Brüggemann of Forschungszentrum Jülich in Germany and Dirk Inzé of VIB and Ghent University in Belgium, are just at the beginning of the process of creating their network, dubbed ECOFE (European Consortium for Open Field Experimentation). The idea was born last February at a meeting of Science Europe and goes back to discussions within a German Research Foundation working group starting four years ago. Now, they are approaching European ministries to explore the possibilities for ECOFE's creation. In addition to finding financial and political investment, ECOFE's success will hinge on whether scientists at the various institutional research stations will be able to sacrifice a bit of their autonomy to focus on targeted research projects, Stützel says. He likens the network to a car sharing service, in which researchers will be giving up the autonomy and control of their own laboratories to have access to facilities in different cities. If ECOFE catches on, thousands of scientists could be using the network to work together on a range of "big picture" agricultural problems. "It will be a rather new paradigm for many traditional scientists, but I think the communities are ready to accept this challenge and understand that research in the 21st century requires these types of infrastructures," Stützel say. "We must now try to make political decision makers aware that a speedy implementation of a network for open field experimentation is fundamental for future agricultural research." More information: Hartmut Stützel et al. The Future of Field Trials in Europe: Establishing a Network Beyond Boundaries, Trends in Plant Science (2016). DOI: 10.1016/j.tplants.2015.12.003


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-28-2015 | Award Amount: 3.33M | Year: 2016

12% of the developed world suffers from congestive heart failure (CHF), which is the most frequent cause of hospitalization in people aged over 65. CHF management involves medications, monitoring of fluid intake and weight, exercise and lifestyle modifications. Since most patients are elderly and suffer from co-morbidities, they have difficulty adhering to the management guidelines, which often leads to poor outcomes. The HeartMan project will develop a personal health system to help CHF patients manage their disease. Its core will be a decision support system that will provide personalised advice to the patients. Its first key feature will be evidence-based predictive models: a short-term model developed in the European project Chiron, and long-term models adapted to focus on modifiable parameters that can improve the patients predicted outcomes. Its second key feature will be the delivery of the advice through a cognitive behavioural therapy based on cognitive dissonance. This is a proven approach that exploits the dissonance between healthy attitudes and unhealthy behaviours to improve the behaviours. It will be augmented by mindfulness exercises, which are expected to make the patients more receptive to the HeartMans advice. The system will also feature advanced health devices and monitoring methods to understand the patients physical and psychological state, and standard-based data management for wide interoperability. In developing the HeartMan system, a human-centred approach will be used. The resulting system will be validated in two trials, which will test its medical effectiveness and usability. The project will also have strong dissemination and exploitation. To ensure industry-standard robustness, the industrial partners will have key role in developing the prototypes, and the documentation necessary for certification as a medical device will be prepared. All the consortium will be involved in IPR management and the building of business models.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.1.4-06 | Award Amount: 1.86M | Year: 2012

Short food supply chains have been advocated as a means of rural development, as they improve the position of primary producers in the value chain. In this proposal we look at short supply chains from the perspective of urban rather than rural development. Short supply chains can play a role in addressing urban problems such as climate change, obesity, storm water control, etc. Short food supply chains have been advocated as a means to reduce CO2 impact of the agricultural system. Although a reduction of food miles certainly contributes to reducing climate impact, this proposal takes as premise that to really improve the ecological performance of the food system other flows of goods and services need to be shortened as well (e.g. nutrient, water, and carbon cycles need to be closed). In the current context these aspects are usually treated separately, this proposal argues to treat them more integrated. The research will analyse the way in which several European city regions deal with short supply chains in food, nutrients, water, and carbon. The project will facilitate selected SMEs to further innovate in food production and delivery, nutrient and water management, and multifunctional use of space, and will disseminate the results among a wider audience of SMEs. By doing so, the research will look beyond the state of the art, it will suggest how city regions could look like if they chose to further relocalise their food system. Finally the project will also establish links with stakeholders and RTD activities regarding urban and peri-urban agriculture and short chain delivery of food in urban and peri-urban areas in developing countries. This will be organised through a process of dialogue, sharing of experiences, exchanging of best practices and joint learning.


2BFUNTEX will exploit the untapped potential in functional textile structures and textile related materials. It will bring together all innovation actors in the field fostering a multidisciplinary approach between universities, research institutes, SMEs (in textile 95% of the companies are SMEs) and sector associations. The 2BFUNTEX team will identify technological gaps and will eliminate barriers resulting in a faster industrial uptake of added value functional materials with new functionalities and improved performance and resulting in creation of new business worldwide. Technological needs will be mapped, new joint international research disciplines will be identified and multidisciplinary lab teams will be created between universities, research institutes and SME research departments. International cooperation will be favoured to exploit the worldwide market expansion potential. Industry will be involved at all stages of the process and will be able to adapt production methods, management and distribution in an early stage. The inventory will enlarge the team of important textile universities and renowned materials research centres and will identify new collaborations. Synergy will be reinforced and created which will enable to identify and develop new functional materials. Training material for research and industry purposes regarding functional materials will be elaborated and implemented European and worldwide. This material will be designed also for sector organisations to train technical people in their SMEs. It will allow a common language regarding functional textile structures and textile related materials, and will increase the number of well-trained people in this field. 2BFUNTEX will organise and participate in conferences, workshops and brokerage events. Along with a website with an extensive database comprising all information gained throughout the inventory phase, collaboration will be boosted and rapid industrial uptake catalysed and enhanced.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: KBBE-2009-1-4-10;KBBE-2009-1-4-11 | Award Amount: 1.20M | Year: 2009

This proposal builds on the outputs of the ASEM Aquaculture Platform, established in 2003 as an EU-Asia framework for dialogue, networking and continuing coordination for sustainable aquaculture development. From 2003-2006, 6 expert workshops targeted key topics (Disease & Health management, Biodiversity & Ecological impacts, Breeding & Domestication, Education, Food safety & Legislation, Food security) and yielded valuable recommendations on future directions in research, production and trade. With increasingly critical demands on aquaculture for food supply and food security, income and employment, the vulnerability of the natural resource issues involved, and the important gains to be realised through developing stronger scientific and economic partnerships between the two regions, the aim is to move more pro-actively into effective policy, into formulation of joint research goals, and into outcomes which contribute to Millennium Development and related goals. The projects major aim is to reconcile ecosystem and economic system demands to consolidate concepts of sustainability in aquaculture development in both regions. Specific actions include: 1) validation of earlier recommendations; 2) translating priority recommendations into concrete actions; 3) facilitate industry interaction between the two regions; 4) build and exchange knowledge and its application. The common denominator of the actions is the concerted effort to initiate joint EU-Asia processes which have impact on research excellence, contributing realistically and effectively to good production practice, improved governance, fair trade, social equity and sustainability. In developing these, the ASEM Aquaculture Platform will strengthen opportunities for the EU aquaculture sector to derive value from its technological and structural assets, and develop valuable trade partnerships, using the driver of import product quality to improve product quality and value in both markets.


News Article | February 14, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

It’s enough to make you cry over your moules frites. Scientists at Ghent University in Belgium recently calculated that shellfish lovers are eating up to 11,000 plastic fragments in their seafood each year. We absorb fewer than 1%, but they will still accumulate in the body over time. The findings affect all Europeans, but, as the most voracious consumers of mussels, the Belgians were deemed to be most exposed. Britons should sympathise – last August, the results of a study by Plymouth University caused a stir when it was reported that plastic was found in a third of UK-caught fish, including cod, haddock, mackerel and shellfish. Now, UK supermarkets are being lobbied to create plastic-free aisles by the campaign group Plastic Oceans Foundation, whose feature-length documentary, A Plastic Ocean, was released in Britain this week. We are finally paying attention to the pollution that has plagued our seas for years – the government is considering a refundable deposit on plastic bottles, and pharmaceutical company Johnson & Johnson recently switched from plastic to paper stems on its cotton buds. Evidently, there’s nothing like serving plastic up on a dinner plate to focus the mind. Whether your national obsession is moules frites or fish and chips, this problem goes way beyond Britain and Belgium. Contaminated fish and shellfish have been found everywhere from Europe, Canada and Brazil to the coast of mainland China – and plastic-eating fish are now showing up in supermarkets. The question is no longer: are we eating plastic in our seafood? What scientists are urgently trying to establish is just how bad for us that is. Another question we might ask: how did we get here? More than a century ago, in 1907, another Belgian, Leo Baekeland, a graduate of Ghent University, invented bakelite. It was, he later admitted, something of an accident, but this welcome development ushered in a colourful new age of plastics. Until then, we had, at great cost and effort, been manipulating products out of natural materials such as shellac, derived from beetle shells. (Charles Mackintosh’s first “mac” – which used derivatives of tar and rubber – must have been pretty pungent in a downpour.) Baekeland, who had moved to the US, saw commercial potential in an entirely synthetic replacement for shellac that would be suitable for mass production. Bakelite was lightweight, affordable, malleable and safe, but perhaps the greatest thing about the plastic Baekeland created, and those that followed, was its durability. Throughout the first half of the 20th century, innovations came thick (and thin) and fast – polystyrene, polyester, PVC, nylon. Soon, they were an inextricable part of everyday life. And then, in 1950, that scourge of the sea arrived: the throwaway polythene bag. In that decade, annual global plastic production reached 5m tonnes; by 2014, it stood at 311m tonnes – shockingly, over 40% of it for single-use packing. Now, plastic’s durability looks less of a boon than it once did. A study in Science Magazine in 2015 estimated that around 8m tonnes of plastic go into the sea each year. And, last year, a report for the Ellen MacArthur Foundation (launched in 2010 by the former round-the-world sailor to promote a more circular economy) estimated that, by 2050, the volume of accumulated plastics in the oceans will be greater than that of fish. Evidently a keen sailor, Baekeland retired in 1939, to spend time on his 70ft yacht, the Ion. Ninety years after his plastics breakthrough, in 1997, another sailor (since turned oceanographer and campaigner), Charles Moore, was traversing the ocean between Hawaii and California when he came across the now infamous Great Pacific Garbage Patch, one of the five main subtropical gyres (circulating systems of ocean currents that draw floating debris into a kind of massive junk vortex). Ever since its discovery, there has been vigorous debate over the size of the patch, with descriptions ranging from the size of Texas to twice that of France. It is, in fact, impossible to definitively measure, because its size – and litter visible on the surface – changes with currents and winds, but its heart is thought to be around 1m sq km, with the periphery spanning a further 3.5m sq km, stretching roughly from the west coast of North America to Japan. An aerial survey last year by Dutch foundation The Ocean Cleanup found it is far bigger than previously estimated, while the UN’s environmental programme warns it is growing so fast that it is now visible from space. In 1997, Moore saw bottles, bags and bits of polystyrene. But what really worried him, and has occupied campaigners and scientists ever since, was the vast soup of tiny plastic particles swirling around below the junk. Moore returned in 1999 to measure the weight of these “microplastics”. “We found six times more plastic than plankton,” he said, sparking a flurry of worldwide research that has not let up since. Researchers from around the world pooled data over six years to 2013, and reached the conclusion that there are already more than five trillion pieces of plastic in the world’s oceans, most of them microplastics. Microplastics – which range in size from 5mm to 10 nanometres – come from a number of sources. One culprit is “nurdles”, the raw plastic pellets shipped around the world for manufacturing, easily lost during transportation (in 2012 a typhoon spilled millions from a ship in Hong Kong). Recently, the spotlight has been on so-called microbeads, tiny plastic balls found in some cosmetic facial scrubs and toothpaste (many governments, including the UK’s, have moved to ban them). Like microfibres – the threads from synthetic clothes lost during laundry, and rubber debris from vehicle tyres – these tiny pieces of plastic are too small to be filtered out of our wastewater systems, and huge quantities end up in the sea. But it’s the single-use plastics for packaging, more than a third of everything we produce, that present the greatest problem. While many plastics don’t biodegrade, they do photodegrade – UV exposure eventually breaks all those plastic bottles and bags down into tiny pieces, which, in common with microbeads and fibres, potentially leach toxic chemical additives – PCBs, pesticides, flame retardants – put there by manufacturers. These tiny particles look like food to some species, and, last November, new research showed that common plastics attract a thin layer of marine algae, making them smell like nutritious food. In July 2015, a team at the Plymouth Marine Laboratory released film they had captured under a microscope showing zooplankton eating microplastic. Given that these tiny organisms form a crucial part of the food chain, the implications were immediately shocking. But a huge variety of the fish and shellfish we eat are consuming plastics directly too. Research published last year in the journal Science found that juvenile perch actively preferred polystyrene particles to the plankton they would normally eat. While most plastic has been found in the guts of fish, and would therefore be removed before eating, some studies have warned that microplastics, particularly at the nanoscale, could transfer from the guts to the meat (and, of course, we eat some species of small fish and shellfish whole). There is growing concern about toxins leaching – laboratory tests have shown that chemicals associated with microplastics can concentrate in the tissues of marine animals. Some commercially important species have seen the majority of their population affected. In 2011 in the Clyde in Scotland, 83% of Dublin Bay prawns, the tails of which are used in scampi, had ingested microplastics; so had 63% of brown shrimp tested across the Channel and southern part of the North Sea. A fortnight ago, Gesamp, a joint group of experts on the scientific aspects of marine environmental protection, published the second part of its global assessment on microplastics. It confirmed that contamination has been recorded in tens of thousands of organisms and more than 100 species. Last year, the European Food Safety Authority called for urgent research, citing increasing concern for human health and food safety “given the potential for microplastic pollution in edible tissues of commercial fish”. In the face of such widespread contamination, the outlook seems bleak. Yet Professor Richard Thompson, a leading international expert on microplastics and marine debris, is upbeat. He has been working in this field for 20 years. In 2004, his team at Plymouth University released the first research on marine microplastics, were the first to show microplastics were retained by organisms such as mussels, and it was their research that found plastic in a third of UK-caught fish. He is reassuringly unfazed about the recent headlines. “You would have to eat well over 10,000 mussels a year to reach the quantities of plastics the Belgian studies suggest,” he says. Even for Belgians, that seems excessive. And, crucially, there is no evidence of harm to humans from those quantities. He agrees contamination is widespread – and concerning – but it is “not yet a cause for alarm. Quantities are low, and at current levels human exposure is likely to be greater in the home or office than via food or drink.” But, he adds: “It’s only going to increase. If we carry on with business as usual, it will be a different story down the line, in 10, 20 years.” It’s important not to overstate the risks before they’re fully understood. The UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation pointed out in 2014 (pdf) just how reliant we have become on seafood as a source of protein – an estimated 10-12% of the global population relies on fisheries and aquaculture for their livelihood. Per capita fish consumption has risen from 10kg in the 1960s to more than 19kg in 2012, and seafood production is annually increasing at a rate of 3.2%, twice the world population growth rate. In other words, demand for seafood is increasing, just as its future viability is at risk. Something has to give – and it is increasingly clear that has to be our reliance on throwaway plastics. When you’re alone in the middle of the Southern Ocean, the nearest land is Antarctica and the closest people are manning the space station above, there’s time to think. If you’re Dame Ellen MacArthur, it sets you to thinking about the flaws of our global economy. As she tells it: “Your boat is your entire world and what you take with you when you leave is all you have, to the last drop of diesel and last package of food. There is no more.” Our economy, she realised, is no different: “It’s entirely dependent on finite materials we have only once in the history of humanity.” To MacArthur, the solution is simple – instead of using these resources up, we should design the waste element out of products in the first place. MacArthur, through her foundation, is working with industry leaders and others to approach design with end of life in mind. She has found one particularly strong ally in the Prince of Wales, whose International Sustainability Unit (ISU) is also working on how innovation and design can reduce the impact of plastic production on the environment. Two weeks ago, the ISU organised a working group, which included MacArthur, to look at plastic waste in the oceans. This is how Professor Thompson found himself on the banks of Rainham Marshes in Essex, collecting plastic debris with senior executives from Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, Adidas, Dell and Marks & Spencer. Of what they picked up, about 80% was plastic bottles – those executives probably saw their own products spat back at them from the Thames. They were shocked, apparently, at the scale of it, which Thompson pointed out “was not inconsistent with beaches worldwide”. Then they all went to the recycling plant. Only a third of the UK’s annual 1.5m tonnes of recyclable plastic waste is recycled. While many drinks bottles are made of easily recyclable PET, some brands add plastic sleeves or colour the bottles, reducing their recyclability. The execs watched those bottles picked out, simply due to a lack of thought at the design stage. The idea of the circular economy is taking hold; there is now broad agreement that industry needs to move towards products that maximise recycling and re-use. As the Prince of Wales put it: “We do need to consider, from the very beginning, the second, third and, indeed, fourth life of the products we use in everyday life.” Thompson is heartened. “This growing recognition,” he says, “was not the case 10 years ago when industry pointed at consumers saying they were responsible … now it’s much clearer there’s responsibility on both sides.” And in what he describes as an exciting step forward, we might see the formation of a stewardship council for plastics, which will connect industries from manufacture through to recycling, and, as the Marine Stewardship Council does for fishing, accredit responsible practice. After all, plastic is not the enemy, it’s incredibly useful, not least in reducing food waste. What’s so positive about recent progress, Thompson points out, is that “unlike other environmental problems, this isn’t a case of us having to do without, we just have to do it differently”. Perhaps the shock of finding plastics returning to us on our dinner plates will help to bring that message home. “We’re on the edge of a major ecological disaster,” Thompson says. “Microplastics in seafood is an illustration of that. There are things we can do, but we need to do them now.”


Adriaens A.,Ghent University | Dowsett M.,University of Warwick
Accounts of Chemical Research | Year: 2010

Corrosion is a major source of degradation in heritage metal objects, and any remedial measures are subject to a strong (Western) ethic that favors conservation as opposed to restoration. Accordingly, major scientific challenges exist for developing appropriate treatment methods to stabilize and protect artifacts after they are recovered from an archaeological site, both before and during their display or storage in a museum. Because inappropriate treatments can cause irreversible damage to irreplaceable objects, it is crucial that the chemical processes involved are fully understood and characterized before any preservation work is undertaken. In this regard, large infrastructural facilities such as synchrotrons, neutron sources, and particle accelerators provide a wealth of analytical possibilities, unavailable in smaller scale laboratories. In general, the intensity of the radiation available allows measurements on a short time scale or with high spatial resolution (or both), so heterogeneous changes induced by a chemical process can be recorded while they occur. The penetrative nature of the radiation (e.g., X-rays, protons, or neutrons) also allows a sample to be studied in air. If necessary, complete artifacts (such as paintings or statuettes) can be examined. In situ analysis in a controlled environment, such as a liquid or corrosive atmosphere, also becomes an exciting possibility. Finally, there are many complementary techniques (local atomic structure or crystal structure determination, macroscopic 3-D imaging (tomographies), imaging chemical analysis, and so on) so the many distinct details of a problem can be thoroughly explored. In this Account, we discuss the application of this general philosophy to studies of corrosion and its prevention in cultural heritage metals, focusing on our recent work on copper alloys. More specifically, we use synchrotron-based techniques to evaluate the use of corrosion potential measurements as a possible monitoring method for copper-based objects recovered from marine environments. The extraction of chlorides from such artifacts is a process that must take place before the artifacts are put on display or stored, because air exposure of untreated metal will result in severe damage or loss in as little as a few weeks. Chloride is removed by soaking the artifact for up to two years in tap water or dilute sodium sesquicarbonate, with regular solution changes. Our research supports the effectiveness of this treatment for thin nantokite (copper(I) chloride) layers, but it raises questions for copper hydroxychlorides (atacamite and paratacamite), especially when these minerals are trapped in fissures. Electrochemical parameters such as the corrosion potential are shown to be insensitive to the physical presence of large hydroxychloride coverages if they overlie a cuprite (Cu2O) layer. X-ray absorption spectroscopy proves to be a good monitor for the chloride in solution over the working electrode, whereas X-ray diffraction offers the potential for real-time measurement of the surface chloride composition. In principle, the two techniques together offer the possibility of monitoring surface and fluid levels simultaneously. © 2010 American Chemical Society.


Garcia-Ramos J.E.,University of Huelva | Heyde K.,Ghent University
Physical Review C - Nuclear Physics | Year: 2014

Background: The Po, Pb, Hg, and Pt region is known for the presence of coexisting structures that correspond to different particle-hole configurations in the shell model language or equivalently to nuclear shapes with different deformation. Purpose: We intend to study the configuration mixing phenomenon in the Hg isotopes and to understand how different observables are influenced by it. Method: We study in detail a long chain of mercury isotopes, 172 - 200Hg, using the interacting boson model with configuration mixing. The parameters of the Hamiltonians are fixed through a least-squares fit to the known energies and absolute B(E2) transition rates of states up to 3 MeV. Results: We obtained the IBM-CM Hamiltonians and we calculate excitation energies, B(E2)'s, quadrupole shape invariants, wave functions, isotopic shifts, and mean-field energy surfaces. Conclusions: We obtain a fairly good agreement with the experimental data for all the studied observables and we conclude that the Hamiltonian and the states we obtain constitute a good approximation to the Hg isotopes. © 2014 American Physical Society.


Sauer M.,CSIC - National Center for Biotechnology | Kleine-Vehn J.,University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna | Kleine-Vehn J.,Ghent University
Plant Cell | Year: 2011

AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN1 (ABP1) is one of the first characterized proteins that bind auxin and has been implied as a receptor for a number of auxin responses. Early studies characterized its auxin binding properties and focused on rapid electrophysiological and cell expansion responses, while subsequent work indicated a role in cell cycle and cell division control. Very recently, ABP1 has been ascribed a role in modulating endocytic events at the plasma membrane and RHO OF PLANTS-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangements during asymmetric cell expansion. The exact molecular function of ABP1 is still unresolved, but its main activity apparently lies in influencing events at the plasma membrane. This review aims to connect the novel findings with the more classical literature on ABP1 and to point out the many open questions that still separate us from a comprehensive model of ABP1 action, almost 40 years after the first reports of its existence. © 2011 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.


Singh G.S.,University of Botswana | Mollet K.,Ghent University | D'Hooghe M.,Ghent University | De Kimpe N.,Ghent University
Chemical Reviews | Year: 2013

Unsymmetrical substitution of the epoxide moiety in epihalohydrins allows the introduction of chirality, making these molecules valuable substrates in enantioselective synthesis as well. As the concept of chirality has become an important issue and challenge in organic and medicinal chemistry, chiral epihalohydrins provide a convenient entry into a wide range of enantiomerically pure target molecules, including complex natural products. The hydrolytic kinetic resolution of terminal oxiranes has been reported for the first time using a Cosalen complex. A major and characteristic property of epihalohydrins is their high reactivity toward a wide variety of nucleophilic reagents, an effect undoubtedly resulting from the presence of three electrophilic carbon centers and the strain associated with the three-membered ring system.


Giraud O.,University Of Toulouse Ups | Giraud O.,French National Center for Scientific Research | Giraud O.,University Paris - Sud | Thas K.,Ghent University
Reviews of Modern Physics | Year: 2010

In a celebrated paper "Can one hear the shape of a drum?" M. Kac [Am. Math. Monthly 73, 1 (1966)]10.2307/2313748 asked his famous question about the existence of nonisometric billiards having the same spectrum of the Laplacian. This question was eventually answered positively in 1992 by the construction of noncongruent planar isospectral pairs. This review highlights mathematical and physical aspects of isospectrality. © 2010 The American Physical Society.


Lamkanfi M.,Ghent University | Dixit V.M.,Genentech
Cell Host and Microbe | Year: 2010

Viral and microbial infections often elicit programmed cell death as part of the host defense system or as a component of the survival strategy of the pathogen. It is thus not surprising that pathogens have evolved an array of toxins and virulence factors to modulate host cell death pathways. Apoptosis, necrosis, and pyroptosis constitute the three major cell death modes for elimination of infected cells. Herein, we discuss the signaling pathways underlying the principal host cell death mechanisms and provide an overview of the strategies employed by viral and microbial pathogens to manipulate these cell death processes. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.


Lamkanfi M.,VIB | Lamkanfi M.,Ghent University | Dixit V.M.,Genentech
Cell | Year: 2014

Recent studies have offered a glimpse into the sophisticated mechanisms by which inflammasomes respond to danger and promote secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. Activation of caspases 1 and 11 in canonical and noncanonical inflammasomes, respectively, also protects against infection by triggering pyroptosis, a proinflammatory and lytic mode of cell death. The therapeutic potential of inhibiting these proinflammatory caspases in infectious and autoimmune diseases is raised by the successful deployment of anti-IL-1 therapies to control autoinflammatory diseases associated with aberrant inflammasome signaling. This Review summarizes recent insights into inflammasome biology and discusses the questions that remain in the field. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


Heyde K.,Ghent University | Von Neumann-Cosel P.,TU Darmstadt | Richter A.,Ghent University
Reviews of Modern Physics | Year: 2010

The nucleus is one of the most multifaceted many-body systems in the Universe. It exhibits a multitude of responses depending on the way one "probes" it. With increasing technical advancements of beams at the various accelerators and of detection systems the nucleus has, over and over again, surprised us by expressing always new ways of "organized" structures and layers of complexity. Nuclear magnetism is one of those fascinating faces of the atomic nucleus discussed in the present review. We shall not just limit ourselves to presenting the by now large data set that has been obtained in the past two decades using various probes, electromagnetic and hadronic alike and that presents ample evidence for a low-lying orbital scissors mode around 3 MeV, albeit fragmented over an energy interval of the order of 1.5 MeV, and higher-lying spin-flip strength in the energy region 5-9 MeV in deformed nuclei nor to the presently discovered evidence for low-lying proton-neutron isovector quadrupole excitations in spherical nuclei. To the contrary, the experimental evidence is put in the perspectives of understanding the atomic nucleus and its various structures of well-organized modes of motion and thus enlarges the discussion to more general fermion and bosonic many-body systems. © 2010 The American Physical Society.


Patent
Basf, Vib Vzw and Ghent University | Date: 2011-08-31

The present invention relates generally to the field of molecular biology and concerns a method for enhancing various economically important yield-related traits in plants. More specifically, the present invention concerns a method for enhancing yield-related traits in plants by modulating expression in a plant of a nucleic acid encoding an POI (Protein Of Interest) polypeptide. The present invention also concerns plants having modulated expression of a nucleic acid encoding an POI polypeptide, which plants have enhanced yield-related traits relative to control plants. The invention also provides hitherto unknown POI-encoding nucleic acids, and constructs comprising the same, useful in performing the methods of the invention.


Patent
Semiconductor Components Industries LLC and Ghent University | Date: 2014-09-17

In one embodiment, a method of forming a circuit to control an electrical machine may include, configuring the circuit to obtain voltage and current information of the voltage over and current in one or more stator coils; configuring the circuit to determine a stator current vector and a stator voltage vector; configuring the circuit to determine an amplitude and phase of a fundamental vector of the stator voltage vector and stator current vector; and configuring the circuit to determine a fundamental vector of a back-EMF.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 5.72M | Year: 2012

Over the past year a new research field has emerged: cavity Optomechanics which brings the quantum regime of mechanical oscillators in reach and may allow to explore new fundamental measurements concepts, may lead to novel transducers and test quantum mechanics on a macroscopic scale. In this research field, which utilizes mechanical oscillators coupled to laser fields, Europe has played a pioneering role. The distinguishing feature of this ITN training network is that the partners are active in this research field (cavity Optomechanics), which facilitates and indeed leverages the collaborative effort and will make this ITN highly effective. Cavity optomechanics is moreover a field which is highly faceted in terms of the required and offered training skills that spans quantum optics, nanofabrication, finite element simulation and cryogenic expertise and techniques as well as quantum theory. To effectively train new students it is therefore pivotal to train students in all relevant skills and techniques and theory. The realization that a single group is much less efficient than a consortium is the major driving force behind the ITN network. It will provide a streamlined, high quality-training program that offers a remarkably diverse set of skills. This training program will be of immediate benefit to the partners that will thereby obtain a superior training of their PhD students, which therefore provides a build-in mechanism that will ensure the effective realization of the proposed ITN training program and it success. The existence of such a training program, which will be opened to international groups, will contribute to the visibility of the EU cavity optomechanics community in an international setting.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 3.77M | Year: 2014

The BIopolymer BAsed FOOd Delivery Systems (BIBAFOODS) network will train young researchers for the advancement of food science and technology, by providing them with the complementary skills necessary to develop the future sustainable food industry and entrepreneurial skills crucial for creating biotechnological food oriented start-up companies. This collaborative training network will combine the complementary training capabilities of each individual partner institution to improve the trainees chances for employment and promote health and welfare in the EC by providing the capability to develop novel functional foods. The scientific focus of the research training is on colloidal delivery systems to protect and deliver active components via foods, resulting in novel functional foods. The development of these systems is to be based on only food-grade ingredients and upon economical feasible processes. The hypothesis is that the materials and coatings can be made responsive to the external chemical conditions and therefore suitable for controlled releases targeted at a desired stage during food processing or at a specific point during digestion of the food, e.g. in the intestinal tract. This will involve probiotic bacteria and enzymes that are liberated and allowed to be active in a controllable way. The ultimate successful materials ensure stability of the active component during long term storage prior to food production, during food production or during digestion, but at the same time liberating the active component at the right point. The behaviour and interaction of the delivery systems will be studied by simulation of gastric and intestinal conditions and by implementation in food production and formulation into probiotic products. To summarize, through the training in BIBAFOODS, 14 young researchers will achieve superior qualifications that will make them highly competitive and attractive for the European food and bio-tech industry.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2013.3.3 | Award Amount: 3.56M | Year: 2013

Pocket will develop a novel point-of-care (PoC) urine test for the detection of tuberculosis (TB), achieving at the same time a low cost (5 to 10 euro end-user cost per test, including depreciation cost of the instrument) and a high accuracy (>80% capture of TB-positive patients, which is much better than the present solutions which reach 60%). The test positions itself between current low-end immunological urine tests with limited accuracy and between high-end expensive nucleic-acid-based tests, which are not truly point-of-care. Throughout this project, special attention will be paid to both end-user requirements (performance, cost, ease-of-use, ...) and to manufacturability. Pocket will go well beyond the development of a mere laboratory prototype, as in the final year of the project, the instrument will be field-tested in Africa and India.\n\nThe combination of low cost and high accuracy will be achieved through a unique integration of several state-of-the-art concepts, which the partners have separately developed and of which the maturity has already been shown:\n\n-a nanophotonic transducer with integrated spectrum analyser developed by UGent (Vernier ring resonator cascade with arrayed waveguide grating spectrometer). This will enable us to eliminate the cost associated with the inclusion of a high-end tunable laser (20k euro) that typically plagues the competing approaches using resonant optical nanophotonic sensors.\n\n-a high-confinement silicon nitride (SiN) platform running in a mature small-volume CMOS fab (imec). The use of SiN as opposed to the more traditional Silicon-on-Insulator material system will enable us to move the operating wavelength from 1550 nm to 900 nm, where both the sources and the detectors are significantly less expensive.\n\n-a novel TB detection system, based on a unique combination of high-quality antibodies for two different biomarkers.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 3.97M | Year: 2013

The strong temporal dynamics of the East African landscape and natural-resource distributions have always encouraged people to innovate and adapt to changing conditions. However, increasing population growth, changes in patterns of land tenure, industrialization, weak systems of governance, and global climate change have exacerbated previously localized environmental problems such as soil erosion, depletion of water catchments, loss of forests and grazing land, falling soil fertility and biodiversity. Novel approaches for resolving these challenges are thus urgently needed. Based on the premise that the past is key to understanding the present and planning for the future, this ITN will establish a leading European training network devoted to combining state-of-the-art research methods to tap into under-appreciated knowledge of how indigenous peoples have previously adapted to East Africas intrinsically unstable climate and land/water resources. By bringing together ecologists, archaeologists, anthropologists, geographers, historians and agronomists the ITN will provide cross-disciplinary training to a new generation of researchers, enabling them to interpret data relating to past and present socio-cultural and ecological dynamics from across the environmental and social sciences and the humanities. Organized by researchers from seven European universities in partnership with Bayer East Africa and U&We, the ITN will co-operate closely with academic counterparts, private-sector stakeholders, NGOs and local communities in East Africa. It will highlight how detailed awareness of the complex history of human-environment interaction in East Africa is central to well-founded and ecologically sustainable resource management, thereby restore the important function of indigenous know-how crucial for devising development policies and climate-risk management for specific areas, and train a new generation of future ecosystem-service managers, policy makers and entrepreneurs.


Patent
Basf, Ghent University and Vib Vzw | Date: 2013-12-18

Plants having enhanced yield-related traits and a method for making the same The present invention relates generally to the field of molecular biology and concerns a method for enhancing various economically important yield-related traits in plants. More specifically, the present invention concerns a method for enhancing yield-related traits in plants by modulating expression in a plant of an isolated nucleic acid encoding a Growth related protein (GRP). The present invention also concerns plants having modulated expression of an isolated nucleic acid encoding a GRP, which plants have enhanced yield-related traits compared with control plants. The invention also provides hitherto unknown isolated GRP-encoding nucleic acids, and constructs comprising the same, useful in performing the methods of the invention.


Patent
Basf, Ghent University and Vib Vzw | Date: 2013-12-25

The present invention relates generally to the field of molecular biology and concerns a method for enhancing various economically important yield-related traits in plants. More specifically, the present invention concerns a method for enhancing one or more yield-related traits in plants by modulating expression in a plant of a nucleic acid encoding a POI (Protein Of Interest) polypeptide. The present invention also concerns plants having modulated expression of a nucleic acid encoding a POI polypeptide, which plants have one or more enhanced yield-related traits compared with control plants. The invention also provides constructs useful in performing the methods of the invention.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: LCE-20-2014 | Award Amount: 4.30M | Year: 2015

Following the EC SET-Plan Education and Training Roadmap, the concept of this proposal is to develop a joint PhD programme between universities and research centres, on the topic of Thermal Energy Storage (TES). The goal of INPATH-TES is to create a network of universities and research institutes to implement a joint PhD programme on TES technologies. The final result of such a network is to educate professionals on these technologies for the European research and industry institutions. The consortium includes 14 universities that will implement the joint PhD programme, two research institutions (AIT and PROMES-CNRS), three companies and two SME (Arcelik, Abengoa Solar NT, KIC InnoEnergy, UFP and LAIF), that will cooperate in defining the programme and in its implementation and deployment. The specific objectives of the project will lead to the qualification of professionals for the European research and industry institutions, bringing Europe to continue being leaders in these technologies. The partners in the proposal will be the core of a future larger network of excellent R&D institutions, and industries for co-funding and industrial placement, sharing infrastructure capacities, and enhancing mobility of students. The overall approach of the project involves a work plan divided in six work packages, being either coordination or support activities. Coordination activities: WP1 Management and coordination; WP3 Developing, maintaining and updating a PhD programme in TES; and WP4 Implementation of the PhD programme in TES. Support activities: WP2 External communication and dissemination; WP5 Stakeholder involvement and extension of partnerships; and WP6 Framework for monitoring and evaluation of INPATH-TES as well as IPR and regulatory issues.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: FCT-05-2014 | Award Amount: 5.45M | Year: 2015

The threat of synthetic drugs is one of the most significant current drug problems worldwide. Amphetamine-Type Stimulants (ATS) are the second most widely used drugs. Since 1990, ATS manufacturing has been reported from more than 70 countries worldwide and the figure keeps rising. In 2008, 80 % of the amphetamine production facilities dismantled worldwide were located in Europe (UNODC, 2010) (EMCCDA, 2011). Organised Crime Groups are involved in ATS large-scale production (Europol, 2007) (EMCDDA, 2009). Since 2011, the wide availability of pre-precursors (like APAAN) significantly lowered the price of the controlled precursor BMK and caused severe environmental problems, taking the problem to a greater dimension. The aim of this project is to design, develop and test a prototype of a system for legal recording, retrieving and monitoring operations of ATS and ATS precursor laboratories in urban areas. The sensor system will be installed within the sewage system and will track waste associated to ATS production. Criminal investigators and forensic specialists will use the system in case of: 1. initial general suspicion of ATS production in a certain area, for locating laboratories by monitoring the sewage system for long time periods; 2. strong suspicions that in a well confined area ATS is being produced, for collecting material for forensic analysis and potential use in court, and for aiding in the planning of LEA raid operations. The Mole prototype will contain the following features: a) miniaturized system for 200mm sewage pipes, b) robust housing taking into account sewage system environment, c) minimized power consumption, d) enhanced operation time supported by energy harvesting, e) high-specificity electro-chemical sensors, f) integrated micro-tanks for sample storage, and g) secure GSM and radio communications for remote monitoring. Analysis of privacy law, data protection and social acceptance will be carried on at different stages.


Patent
Ghent University and Semiconductor Components Industries LLC | Date: 2014-03-07

In one embodiment, a method of forming a circuit to control an electrical machine may include, configuring the circuit to obtain voltage and current information of the voltage over and current in one or more stator coils; configuring the circuit to determine a stator current vector and a stator voltage vector; configuring the circuit to determine an amplitude and phase of a fundamental vector of the stator voltage vector and stator current vector; and configuring the circuit to determine a fundamental vector of a back-EMF.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: ENV.2010.1.2.3-1 | Award Amount: 2.62M | Year: 2011

The BROWSE proposal is focussed directly and precisely on all the requirements of the call text. Specifically, it will: - Review, improve and extend the models currently used in the risk assessment of plant protection products (PPPs) to evaluate the exposure of operators, workers, residents and bystanders. - Use the new and improved exposure models to contribute to the implementation of Regulation 1107/2009 on authorisation of PPPs, replacing Directive 91/414/EC. - Use the new and improved exposure models to contribute to the implementation of the Thematic Strategy on the Sustainable Use of Pesticides. - Involve all relevant stakeholders and end-users and take full account of relevant gender issues in developing the exposure models and policy tools. The workplan is aligned with these key objectives. In addition, several key cross-cutting themes are established to ensure their consistent and integrated treatment throughout the project. These are: exposure scenarios, volatilisation, transfer coefficients, statistical modelling and calibration, and data management. Key stakeholder groups will be represented on the project Advisory Panel as well as participating directly via consultations and workshops, and in surveys to obtain new data on practices and sociobehavioural and gender factors influencing exposure. Models for key exposure scenarios covering different regions of the EU will be developed in order of priority based on consultation with stakeholders, implemented as user-friendly software, and tested with end-users. Project outputs will be delivered through established networks with end-users in EU and national authorities, national training organisations, the pesticide industry, and relevant trade unions and NGOs. The consortium is superbly equipped to address the project objectives, including international leading experts on every aspect and long experience in both the science and the regulatory aspects of exposure assessment.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 3.55M | Year: 2011

SANITAS will create the next generation of integrated Urban Water System (UWS) management professionals by providing a unique Europewide training platform in the technical and complementary skills they will require. This is needed since in the near future climate change will bring dramatic regional variations in excessive surplus and deficiency in water supply and unpredictable variations in water quality placing unprecedented demands on European UWSs. SANITAS is acutely aware of many unmet needs regarding deficiencies in manpower and application of innovation to the field. The partners have realized the need to draw on their Complementary skills, to innovate at all levels and create a critical mass of excellence that will drive the innovation required to comprehensively address the fundamental rethinking of water use management that climate change demands. They have also realized that the scale of the problems to be faced in future will require new approaches to cooperation between academia, industry and policy makers that transcend traditional barriers to the creation and uptake of innovation and enabling technologies. By drawing on expert participation from academia, industry, water authorities and policy specialists, SANITAS will critically examine and develop the cutting edge skills required to meet the future UWS management challenges that Europe faces. SANITAS introduces novel methodologies that will provide direct training to researchers in Intellectual Asset Management, patent application filing and how to write successful reports for policy makers. Over and above regional impact, SANITAS will serve as a source for regional UWS infrastructure integration and policy formulation worldwide. By doing so, SANITAS will support the responsibility and opportunity Europe has to take the lead in technical innovation and policy formulation that the world needs in facing critical challenges of water quality and supply and energy requirements of wastewater management.


The Feel4Diabetes project addresses HCO5-2014: Global Alliance for Chronic Diseases: prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this project is to develop, implement and evaluate a community-based intervention aiming to create a more supportive social and physical environment to promote lifestyle and behaviour change to prevent type 2 diabetes among families from low and middle income countries and from vulnerable groups in high income countries in Europe. Methods: The PRECEDE-PROCEED Model will provide the theoretical framework for the development, implementation and evaluation of the Feel4Diabetes intervention. The framework has two phases, namely the PRECEDE and PROCEED phase. During the PRECEDE phase, the target population as well as behaviours related to type 2 diabetes and their determinants will be identified. Existing research programs and guidelines for type 2 diabetes prevention, policies, legislation, local infrastructure and human resources will also be recorded. Based on the knowledge gained from this phase, a low-cost and applicable in low-resource settings community-based intervention programme will be developed, with the active engagement of local stakeholders, providing access to the existing infrastructure and human resources wherever feasible. During the PROCEED phase, the intervention will be implemented and its process, impact, outcome, cost-effectiveness and scalability will be evaluated. The results of the intervention will be disseminated, aiming to embed it into policy and practice. Consortium: The Feel4Diabetes multidisciplinary consortium incorporates the necessary expertise on diabetes prevention, behaviours, nutrition, physical activity, policy and health economics. It consists of 10 partners from 7 universities, 1 research institute, 1 advocacy group and a small-medium enterprise, representing European low-middle income, high income and under socioeconomic crisis countries.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-ITN-2008 | Award Amount: 4.31M | Year: 2009

The MULTIMOD Training Network will have duration of 48 months and will bring together 8 academic research groups with 5 industrial partners from 8 European countries to undertake innovative research and scientific research training in Multi-Scale Computational Modeling of Chemical and Biochemical Systems. The network will provide unique cross- and multi-disciplinary training opportunities for 19 ESRs (each for 3 years) with background in chemistry, chemical engineering, physics, biology and applied mathematics. The MULTIMOD training network will address the objectives of a) equipping young researchers at the start of their careers with the knowledge and skills required for Europes knowledge-based economy and society and b) overcoming the fragmentation that exists across the European chemical/biochemical research sector. MULTIMOD will intend to raise the efficiency of the chemical/biochemical research sector and improve Europes attractiveness for researchers by (a) concentrating on advances in process modeling and simulation and (b) offering decisive training and transfer of knowledge opportunities. The operation and scope of the training network will be in accordance with the objective identified in the SusChem report Vision for 2025 and Beyond as the urgent need to train the next generation of individuals able to work across the boundaries of chemistry, biology, chemical and biochemical engineering.


More than half a million people live in Europe on chronic renal replacement therapy by hemodialysis (HD). This number increases annually at a constant rate of 8%. The Achilles heel of HD is the vascular access (VA) used to connect patient circulation to the artificial kidney. The current recommendation for VA is the native arteriovenous fistula (AVF), surgically created in the forearm. VA dysfunction is the major cause of morbidity and hospitalisation in HD patients, and the major limitation of HD treatment. Short- and long-term AVF dysfunction includes non-maturation (inadequate increase in blood flow after surgery), stenosis due to intimal hyperplasia, and ultimately thrombotic occlusion. Steal syndrome and cardiac failure are also common complications of AVF creation. Prediction and prevention of VA dysfunction are still open clinical challenges with more than 90,000 procedures/year in Europe for revision or reoperation. Despite the magnitude of the clinical problem, there has been a paucity of novel therapeutic interventions in this field due to complex mechanisms responsible for AVF complications, which are closely related to both the sudden and sustained hemodynamic changes involved in AVF creation.\nThe ARCH project will develop image-based patient-specific computational modelling tools to simulate hemodynamic changes induced by AVF surgery and long-term vascular and cardiac adaptation. The modelling tools will be designed and experimentally validated to predict AVF function for improvement of surgical planning and AVF management, and will be provided to clinical end users by a distributed IT infrastructure. Verification of model prediction of AVF maturation, patency, onset of steal syndrome and cardiac overload will be performed on the basis of prospective observational studies in HD patients. The basic tools and data produced in the context of the project will be made available under open-source licenses and shared in the context of the VPH initiative.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: INFRADEV-03-2016-2017 | Award Amount: 2.72M | Year: 2017

Europe has a long and rich tradition as a centre for the arts and humanities. However, the digital transformation poses challenges to the arts and humanities research landscape all over the world. Responding to these challenges the Digital Research Infrastructure for Arts and Humanities (DARIAH) was launched as a pan-European network and research infrastructure. After expansion and consolidation, which involved DARIAHs inscription on the ESFRI roadmap, DARIAH became a European Research Infrastructure Consortium (ERIC) in August 2014. The DESIR project sets out to strengthen the sustainability of DARIAH and firmly establish it as a long-term leader and partner within arts and humanities communities. By DESIRs definition, sustainability is an evolving 6-dimensional process, divided into the following challenges: Dissemination: DESIR will organise a series dissemination events, including workshops in the US and Australia, to promote DARIAH tools and services and initiative collaborations. Growth: DESIR sets out to prepare the ground for establishing DARIAH membership in six new countries: the UK, Finland, Spain, Switzerland, Czech Republic and Israel. Technology: DESIR will widen the DARIAH research infrastructure in three areas, vital for DARIAHs long-term sustainability: entity-based search, scholarly content management, visualization and text analytic services. Robustness: DESIR will make DARIAHs organizational structure and governance fit for the future and develop a detailed business plan and marketing strategy. Trust: DESIR will measure the acceptance of DARIAH, especially in new communities, and define mechanisms to support trust and confidence in DARIAH. Education: Through training and teaching DESIR will promote the use of DARIAH tools and services. The DESIR consortium is composed of core DARIAH members, representatives from potential new DARIAH members and external technical experts. It is balanced between the different European regions.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2011-ITN | Award Amount: 3.80M | Year: 2012

Traffic noise pollution in urban areas is a major environmental problem within the European Union. Creating an acceptable acoustic outdoor environment is a big challenge of high need. Creating as well as preserving environments, which are supportive for health and well-being in a sustainable manner is an even bigger but unavoidable task. In order to succeed, specialists are required with a broad research competence covering areas such as acoustic prediction methods, noise control and soundscaping, but also aspects of city and traffic planning. However, specialists equipped with such a competence spectrum are hardly found. Therefore, the goal of SONORUS is to close this gap and bring together universities, enterprises and public organizations that aim to offer training to ESRs in an arena of trans-disciplinary research. The training is designed around real-life urban test sites that are characterized by a poor acoustic environment due to noise from road, rail or air traffic. These test sites are provided by three major European cities (Berlin, Rome and Antwerp). To these test sites, the ESRs will apply their knowledge and skills gained from individual acoustics related research projects, in-depth courses on acoustics as well as on different aspects of spatial planning. The ESRs will, in teams, design a long-term plan for the development of the acoustic environment on the test sites. This activity will also give the opportunity to train complementary skills such as communication and outreach skills. From SONORUS a new generation of researchers will emerge with the profile adapted to the supra-disciplinary approach needed to reverse the negative trend of a deteriorating acoustic outdoor environment in urban areas. SONORUS has been designed with the intension that these researchers will be best prepared to further develop and above all to apply the new integrated concepts into practical urban planning processes and their effective coordination.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-EJD | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-EJD | Award Amount: 3.86M | Year: 2016

Our aim is to create, in Europe, an innovative and ambitious multidisciplinary intersectoral joint doctoral training programme, dedicated to Methods in Research on Research (MIROR) in the field of clinical research. Research on Research, is an emerging new scientific discipline that aims to reduce waste in research and increase research value. Waste in research represents tens of billions of Euros spent each year on studies that are redundant, flawed in their design, never published or poorly reported. The public is the main victim of this waste and reducing waste and increasing value of research represents a major societal challenge. Our proposal involving 15 early-stage researchers, aims to 1) prepare students for envisioning the future challenges in clinical research and find innovative solutions to face them, 2) train students to go well beyond the state-of-the-art in their research, 3) help students think differently, taking advantage of the multidisciplinary expertise and intercultural diversity of the network, 4) teach students how to move from research to action and convert knowledge and idea into a product, and 5) help students develop skills to match the public and private sector needs and create new professional opportunities. MIROR will bring together 7 world-class research teams in various disciplines (computer sciences, applied mathematics, biostatistics, bioinformatics, clinical epidemiology, psychology, social sciences and translational medicine) from 6 different European countries; 6 non-academic partners involved in diverse sectors, and 4 major academic partners. We will tackle several steps of a clinical research project (planning, conduct, reporting and the peer-review); various study designs (observational studies, randomised trials, systematic reviews); various study questions (therapeutic, diagnostic, and prognostic evaluation) using various methods (meta-epidemiologic studies, qualitative studies, experimental studies, simulations etc).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2010.1.2-02 | Award Amount: 7.75M | Year: 2011

Organic and low-input dairy farming systems are increasingly noted as delivering multifunctional benefits to the agricultural industry and society but technical and economic constraints prevent widespread adoption. SOLID will deliver an innovative toolbox of novel methodologies that will contribute to the competitiveness of the dairy industry and increase the effectiveness with which these benefits are delivered. SOLID facilitates the use of breeds and feeding strategies to maintain productivity, improve animal health and welfare while meeting the market requirement for high quality milk. A multidisciplinary team comprising academic and stakeholder (SME) partners from across Europe, encompassing dairy cows and goats, will identify and apply novel strategies at the farm level and throughout the supply chain. Innovative science and models, combined with a participatory approach, will tackle practical issues, and assess competitive sustainability and integration across a range of scales and geographical contexts. Proteomics combined with genotyping and calorimetry will be used to characterise and quantify dairy cow and goat breed adaptation to organic and low-input systems. Given the reliance of such systems on forage, SOLID will develop novel and sustainable feed resources and design a decision-support model to optimise the management of on-farm forage supply. Life cycle assessment tools will assess environmental sustainability of grassland-based multifunctional dairy systems. Analysis of the supply chain from fork to farm will quantify the acceptability of new strategies and enhance collaboration. An integrated assessment tool and socio-economic modelling will assess innovations on farms and along supply chains, and will predict the impact of more widespread adoption of low-input practises. Effective knowledge dissemination and exchange activities will target key stakeholder groups ensuring exploitation of outputs at animal, farm, region, sector and European levels.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: KBBE.2010.2.1-01 | Award Amount: 11.58M | Year: 2012

Nutrition-related diseases caused a loss of over 56 million years of healthy life of European citizens in 2000. I.Family will make a significant contribution to reduce this burden by studying the interplay and impact of the main drivers of dietary behaviour and food choice. It will take advantage of the unique opportunity to follow-up the large IDEFICS childrens cohort to not only provide added value by maintaining the existing cohort but also, exceptionally, assess the dynamic nature of causal factors over time and during transition into adolescence. The projects acronym indicates its focus on the individual and its family. By re-assessing children and their parents I.Family will compare families who developed or maintained a healthy diet with those whose diet developed in an unfavourable direction to study the impact of biological, behavioural, social and environmental factors on dietary behaviour over time. Focus will be on the family environment, socio-behavioural and genetic factors determining familial aggregation. Subgroups with contrasting dietary profiles will undergo an enhanced protocol including measurement of brain activation, expression of genes related to food choice, biological and genetic basis for taste thresholds, role of sleep, sedentary time, physical activity and impact of the built environment. I.Family will also link health outcomes like body composition and cardio-metabolic markers to diet and interacting factors to determine their prognostic value. Thus I.Family provides strength of methodology, breadth of coverage and depth of investigation across the ecological model. Guided by research on ethical implications I.Family will be deriving effective communication strategies to empower European consumers to induce behaviour changes, supported by novel web-based, interactive personalised feedback on dietary behaviour. By building on existing success I.Family will take the research on dietary behaviour to the next level in a short time frame.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2008-4.0-2 | Award Amount: 12.21M | Year: 2009

The project addresses from one site the most critical and costly step to produce liquid fuel from natural gas using conventional routes, e.g. the stage of syngas production, and from the other side explores alternative routes to convert natural gas to liquid transportable products. The general objective is to explore novel and innovative (precompetitive) routes for transformation of natural gas to liquid products, particularly suited for remote areas to facilitate the transport. The aim is an integrated multi-disciplinary approach to develop in a long term vision the next-stage catalysts and related precompetitive technologies for gas to liquid conversion, in fully consistence with the indications of the call. For this reason, we have excluded to consider as part of the project catalytic technologies, such as FT synthesis and hydrocracking. In addition, we have excluded to investigate coal to liquid, both due to environmental impact of the use of coal, and to focus R&D. We have thus focused the project on three cluster lines: 1. new, not conventional routes for catalytic syngas formation from natural gas which include steps of separation by membrane and eventual reuse of byproducts; 2. direct catalytic conversion of methane to methanol/DME; 3. direct catalytic conversion of methane to aromatics under non-oxidative conditions followed by upgrading of the products by alkylation with ethane/propane.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2011.3.1.9-1 | Award Amount: 2.66M | Year: 2012

The agriculture sector is vital for food, feed and bio-fuel production, but at the same time it is a major cause of environmental pollution and natural resource depletion. Sustainable solutions are demanded that will enable agriculture to produce more with less: become more productive and less harmful to the environment and human health. ECO-ZEO aims at the development of a new pool of Green crop protection products delivering a wide range of beneficial effects including reduced water consumption, increased crop yield, lower chemical input, crop protection and tolerance to abiotic stress and healthier conditions to workers in agriculture and agrochemical sectors. The ECO-ZEO products will rely on the innovative application of Zeolite 4A to the surface of leaves and fruits, adapted strategies for sustainable crop protection (such as chromatic masking, behavior interference and biocontrol), novel use of sustainable active ingredients and pigments, andnew configurations of additives for enhanced performance of the coating. The developed crop protection solutions will be lab- and field trialed for four crops: apple, tomato, table grape and orange. The best performing solutions will be validated through demonstration with European farmers. Sustainability, eco-efficiency and Life-cycle analyses will be performed throughout the project. Achieving both environmental and economic sustainability is one of the main added values of ECO-ZEO. ECO-ZEO will be achieved by means of a new innovation process in agricultural green products based on the alliance of Academia, Agro-Biotech SMEs and Industry. Firm plans for the full-scale exploitation of the developed products and technology will ensure this alliance will translate into market presence. The participation of SMEs is further enhanced by the allocation of 39% of EC Contribution to SMEs.


Patent
Basf, Vib Vzw and Ghent University | Date: 2013-12-04

The present invention relates generally to the field of molecular biology and concerns a method for improving various economically important growth characteristics in plants. More specifically, the present invention concerns inter alia a method for modifying growth characteristics in plants by modulating expression in a plant of a nucleic acid encoding a HUB1 (Histone Monoubiquitination 1) polypeptide or encoding another protein useful in the methods of the present invention. The modified growth characteristics comprise a modification of light regulated phenotypes, such as modified circadian clock and/or circadian clock responses, or modified plant architecture.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2010.2.4.5-2 | Award Amount: 7.86M | Year: 2010

Chronic inflammatory diseases associated with allergy, including asthma and rhinitis, constitute a major and continuously growing public health concern for Europe. However, the causative factors and mechanisms converting a physiological inflammatory reaction to a chronic response triggering allergic disease remain elusive. Viral infections, particularly those caused by human rhinoviruses (RV) are the most frequent triggers of acute asthma exacerbations. RV infections have more recently been associated with asthma initiation; there is evidence suggesting that such infections may also contribute to respiratory allergy persistence. The strategic aims of PreDicta are to evaluate the hypothesis that repeated infections reprogram the immune system towards a persistent inflammatory pattern leading to respiratory allergies by (i) dissecting the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the lack of resolution of inflammation in the context of a human disease, (ii) identifying specific infectious agents and underlying altered host-pathogen interactions, and develop relevant prognostic and therapeutic strategies. PreDicta follows three interconnected workflows: models, mechanisms and translational output. Models include a longitudinal cohort in children, mouse models of repeated virus infection, primary epithelial cultures from patients, viral-bacterial interaction models, and models of epithelial-T-cell-dendritic cell interactions. These will be used to look into disease persistence, inflammation patterns, dysbiosis, immune regulation and resolution of inflammation. Translational outputs include prognostic use of subtype-specific antiviral antibodies, DNAZymes for therapeutic use and delivery technologies targeted to the bronchial epithelium. This interdisciplinary Consortium with strong track record, unique resources and strong translational focus, aims to produce new knowledge and technologies that can rapidly and effectively reach clinical care.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SPA.2013.2.1-01 | Award Amount: 2.75M | Year: 2014

The European Space Agency has invested heavily in two cornerstone missions: Herschel and Planck. These space observatories provide us with an unprecedented opportunity to study, at far infrared wavelengths, the cold Universe beyond our Galaxy. As these missions come to an end (2013) they will leave a huge legacy data set that we intend to exploit by utilising the complimentary expert skills of researchers at six sites across Europe. To maximise our spatial resolution and sensitivity to cosmic dust our intention is to analyse in detail 3045 local galaxies (v<3000 km/s) selected via their near infrared luminosity (stellar mass). This data provides us with an opportunity to study cosmic dust in galaxies to answer fundamental questions about: the origin of the chemical elements, physical processes in the interstellar medium (ISM), its effects on the emitted stellar radiation, its relation to star formation and the cosmic far infrared background. In the course of our work we will develop tools and computer models that will help us relate observed cosmic dust emission to the physical properties of the dust (chemical composition, size distribution, temperature), the origins of dust (evolved stars, super novae, growth in the ISM) and the processes that destroy it (high energy collisions and shock heated gas). To help us interpret the data we will use our own, world leading, Monte Carlo photon tracing radiative transfer model of galaxies and our state-of-the-art model of dust physical properties. To carry out this research we will need to combine the Herschel/Planck data with that from many other recently compiled databases that contain observations of our sample galaxies at other wavelengths, thus creating the definitive legacy database - DustPedia.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.1.4 | Award Amount: 8.45M | Year: 2012

Cyber-physical networks based on embedded systems are part of our society and gain spread and importance. Next generations of aircrafts and cars will be tightly interconnected with each other, with the Internet and other infrastructures. The same holds for many industries and areas of our life. Ubiquitous, highly critical systems go online and create a domain of mixed criticalities, where security and safety requirements of different levels mix. Today, state of the art technology does not provide trustworthiness for such interconnection and mix.\n\nThe projects cornerstone is MILS (Multiple Independent Levels of Security), a high-assurance security architecture that supports the coexistence of untrusted and trusted components, based on verifiable separation mechanisms and controlled information flow.\nFor the first time in Europe, EURO-MILS does a complete Common Criteria security evaluation of a MILS system to its highest levels of assurance, including formal verification engineering. Hardware dependencies are addressed from the beginning by prototype development on two hardware platforms in automotive and avionics.\nEURO-MILS is strongly market oriented, is carried out in pan-European context, and has an advisory board with government IT security authorities (BSI-Germany and ANSSI-France). In addition, the methodology gained from this high-assurance certification and investigating MILS business, legal, and social acceptance benefit not only the MILS domain but all high-assurance security certifications in Europe.\nThe project brings together eight leading industrial companies, a research company, two research oriented SMEs, and three universities from five European countries to form a complete chain stretching from basic research, via applied research, up to end-user oriented service providers. EURO-MILS is expected to put Europe into a strong position with regards both to high-assurance Common Criteria certification and MILS systems.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH-2007-2.4.2-2 | Award Amount: 14.92M | Year: 2008

Fighting Aneurysmal Diseases (FAD) is a public health in EU, because of the ageing population. In the absence of intervention, aneurysms evolve towards rupture and death. The translational objectives of the project are to accelerate the acquisition of knowledge, and to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic tools for FAD in humans. The project innovates by integrating two different localizations differing in their initial etiologies but similar in their evolution. FAD will be built by pooling existing and new clinical & biological databases in EU. Tissue and cell banks will be constituted. The deliverables will be the standardization of clinical and biological procedures and the recording of all the material available in the consortium. These databases will provide a basis for genetic studies. Pathophysiology of aneurysms will be explored through human tissue and experimental models in transgenic animals, focusing on the role of proteases and their source within diseased tissues. Human databases, genetic & pathophysiological concepts will provide basis for the development of new diagnostic tools: genetic screening, identification of new surrogate markers, validation of candidate markers and discovery of new ones by proteomic approaches; and functional imaging, visualizing in situ various biological activities. These new molecules/cells of interest will be targeted in preclinical therapeutic approaches, using animal models, and by developing clinical trials. The objective of FAD will be achieved through the organization of a consortium, grouping 15 partners, integrating numerous medical and scientific disciplines. The consortium includes academic partners from 10 different EU countries, a Turkish research team, and 3 industrial partners. The acquired scientific and technological knowledges will be disseminated through training sessions, participation in European meetings, communication toward industry, and direct relationships with patient associations.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-ITN-2008 | Award Amount: 3.46M | Year: 2009

Medical imaging (MI) is at the heart of many of todays improved diagnostic and treatment technologies. Computer-based solutions are vastly more capable of both quantitative measurement of the medical condition and the pre-processing tasks of filtering, sharpening, and focusing image detail. Bio-inspired and Soft Computing (BC, SC) techniques have been successfully applied in each of the fundamental steps of medical image processing and analysis (e.g. restoration, segmentation, registration or tracking). The natural partnership of humans and intelligent systems and machines in MI is to provide the clinician with powerful tools to take better decisions regarding diagnostic and treatment. The main goal of the network is to create a training programme where the enrolled early-stage researchers (ESRs) will be exposed to a wide variety of SC and BC techniques, as well as to the challenge of applying them to different situations and problems within the different MI stages. A personalised, exhaustive and complementary programme will consist of: i) a personalised research plan based on individual research projects; ii) local and network-wide specific training courses, both in face-to-face and virtual modalities; iii) the networks complementary skills courses, workshops and final conference; and iv) the international research stays among the different partners. The collaboration of experts from the area of MI with those working on BC and SC applications to computer vision will generate new and viable methods and solutions from the combined ideas of these communities. The presence of both research and technical partners in the network, including hospitals and companies, will provide the appropriate framework for application domain focused research. The trained ESRs will acquire a strong background for the development of intelligent systems based on BC-SC providing flexible application-oriented solutions to current MI problems in the clinical and research field.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: HEALTH.2010.3.4-1 | Award Amount: 4.26M | Year: 2011

Multiple reports have documented the important deficit in human resources in health (HRH) in Africa. The causes are multiple and relate to a combination of underproduction, internal mal-distribution and inappropriate task allocation, working conditions and brain drain. The HURAPRIM-project will develop innovative interventions and policies and address the HRH crisis. The objectives of the projects are to analyze the actual situation of HRH in Africa, to understand the complexity of the causes for the actual shortages in primary health care, to test interventions, strategies and policies that may improve the situation and to maximise networking and synergies. In order to achieve these goals, the project will assess the scope of the deficit in human resources and analyse the process of recruitment, undergraduate and postgraduate training, professional retention and unemployment and this for a variety of primary health care workers. The known complexity of the problem will prevent us from applying a one size fits all-approach. Therefore, the project consortium brings together three experienced and committed European partners and five African partners, representing different parts of Africa and specific situations in HRH. The designed interventions will be tested out through case-studies in these partner countries. The interventions will target different levels (capacity building, recruitment and retention, task differentiation and cooperation with informal sector/traditional healers), will addresses (in various degrees of importance) aspects at the micro-, meso and macro-levels and will be designed with involvement of all stakeholders, political authorities, NGOs and especially the local population. The frame of reference for the analysis will look at relevance, equity, quality, efficiency, acceptability, sustainability, participation and feasibility. Acceptance by policy makers, in close cooperation with stakeholders and of the local communities will be a main focu


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-01b-2014 | Award Amount: 9.31M | Year: 2015

Helminth and ectoparasitic infections of ruminants and poultry have a huge impact on the biological efficiency of these vital food sources. Indiscriminate antiparasitic use has led to drug resistance across the globe. The main alternative to the dwindling supply of antiparasitics is vaccines. Here, in the PARAGONE project, findings from previous EU and other-funded projects on parasite vaccine development will be exploited to take a number of promising prototypes towards commercialisation. Partners from the Europe, China, Uruguay, SMEs and pharma, will directly move forward prototypes against the ruminant helminths Fasciola hepatica, Cooperia spp., Ostertagia ostertagi, Teladorsagia circumcincta and Haemonchus contortus and, the ectoparasitic mites, Psoroptes ovis (ruminants) and Dermanyssus gallinae (poultry). They will utilise novel adjuvants or delivery systems to maximise efficacy of some of the prototypes. Moreover, immunology studies will focus on pathogens that have previously proved problematic, often because they release immunosuppressive molecules that must be overcome for vaccines to work or because recombinant vaccines have failed to elicit protection observed with native prototypes. State-of-the-art technologies will be used to interrogate host/parasite interactions to define key signatures of protection that can be used to inform delivery systems that will enhance immunity, while other studies will define polymorphism in current vaccine candidates to ensure derived prototypes will be fit-for-purpose across geographic scales. Fundamental, is engagement of the scientists with pharma and other stakeholders (farmers, veterinarians, regulators) via many dissemination activities that will be used to obtain feedback on how the vaccines can be best deployed in the field. The output will be at least two prototypes to the point of uptake by pharma, government or philanthropic agencies, and a clear pathway to commercialisation for all prototypes studied.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP-SICA | Phase: ENV.2011.1.1.5-1 | Award Amount: 4.76M | Year: 2011

AMAZALERT will enable raising the alert about critical feedbacks between climate, society, land-use change, vegetation change, water availability and policies in Amazonia. We will: 1) analyze and improve coupled models of global climate and Amazon, land use, vegetation and socio-economic drivers to quantify anthropogenic and climate induced land-use and land cover change and non-linear, irreversible feedbacks among these components 2) assess the role of regional and global policies and societal responses in the Amazon region for altering the trajectory of land-use change in the face of climate change and other anthropogenic factors and finally 3) propose i) an Early Warning System for detecting any imminent irreversible loss of Amazon ecosystem services, ii) policy response strategies to prevent such loss. We first prioritise the functions of Amazonia and threats to these. We then will analyse uncertainties in biogeochemistry, land cover (vegetation), land-use change and regional hydrology , as well as nonlinear responses and feedbacks using existing and new simulations from state of the art models in which land surface is coupled to global climate. The way in which policies and possible future response strategies of policy makers, trade and economy will affect land-use change will be modelled. This will lead to (A) understanding the impact on and effectiveness of a range of international and regional policy options, including REDD\; and (B) identification of both biophysical and socio-economic indicators of irreversible change. AMAZALERT integrates the multidisciplinary knowledge and research of world-renowned, highly influential climate, land cover, land use change scientists and also policy analysts from 14 European and South-American institutions that have been collaborating for 10 to 30 years. Thus, this project can achieve maximum impact on EU (2020 climate goals), international and South-American strategies, including REDD


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SSH-2007-1.2-03 | Award Amount: 1.86M | Year: 2008

The aim of the VICO project is to assess the impact of Venture Capital and Private Equity (VC/PE) financing on the economic performance of European innovative entrepreneurial ventures as they are reflected by their innovation output, employment, growth, and competitiveness, and the role VC/PE investors play in helping these firms bridge their resource and competence gap beyond the provision of financing. Particular attention will be devoted to the institutional variety of VC/PE investors in Europe. We will consider factors affecting both the demand for and the supply of VC/PE financing, at micro and macro level. In particular, we will analyze how the effects of VC/PE financing on the economic performance of portfolio companies are moderated by i) the characteristics of the investor, ii) the characteristics of invested firms, and iii) the characteristics of the business and institutional environment in which firms operate. In addition, we will examine specific open issues that play a crucial role for the development of the VC/PE sector in Europe, namely: i) the design of a mix of multi-level policy schemes targeting seed and pre-seed capital; ii) exit mechanisms for VC/PE investors; and iii) the European integration of the VC/PE sector and the internationalization of VC/PE investors. The project will benefit from a unique combination of qualitative (survey analyses and case studies) and quantitative empirical methodologies. As to these latter, the project will build and use a micro¯o cross-country panel type dataset with a rather long longitudinal dimension and wide coverage of EU countries so as to overcome some of the key weaknesses of the extant empirical literature. The consortium is a blend of well known scientists from different disciplines (i.e. finance, innovation economics, entrepreneurship, management, policy science). Several of them have already collaborated in EU promoted research projects (such as the VCFUN project promoted by the PRIME NoE).


The requirement for sustainable food production is a global issue to which the EU contributes as a major livestock producer. It is critical to improve animal production efficiency while sustaining environmentally friendly milk production. More profitable dairy production requires increased milk yield, cow health, longevity and fertility; reduced environmental footprint and optimised use of inputs. These are multifactorial problems to achieve. GplusE aims to identify the genotypes controlling biological variation in the important phenotypes of dairy cows, to appreciate how these are influenced by environmental and management factors and thus allow more informed and accurate use of genomic selection. GplusE will link new genomic data in dairy cows to a comprehensive array of phenotypic information going well beyond those existing traits recorded by dairy breeding organisations. It will develop systems that will focus herd and cow management on key time points in production that have a major influence on the rest of the productive cycle including efficiency, environment, physiological status, health, fertility and welfare. This will significantly advance the science, efficiency and management practices in dairy production well beyond the current state-of-the art. The major bioinformatics element of the proposal will illuminate the bovine genome and ensure a reverse flow of information to annotate human and other mammalian genomes; it will ensure training of animal scientists (PhDs & Postdocs) to a high skill level in the use of bioinformatics. The end result of this project will be a comprehensive, integrated identification of genomic-phenotypic associations relevant to dairy production. This information will be translated into benefits for animal breeding and management that will considerably improve sustainable dairy production. It will provide basic biological information into the mechanisms by which genotype, environment and their interaction influence performance.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ENV.2013.6.3-2 | Award Amount: 5.50M | Year: 2013

European pigs and cows jointly produce about 1.27 billion tonnes of manure per year, a largely unexploited resource of organic carbon and nutrients, and therefore an exquisite mining opportunity. ManureEcoMine proposes an integrated approach to the treatment and reuse of animal husbandry waste in nitrate vulnerable and sensitive areas and beyond, by applying the eco-innovative principles of sustainability, resource recovery and energy efficiency. Technologies of proven efficacy in the wastewater treatment field will be combined in several process configurations to demonstrate their technological and environmental potential at pilot scale for cow and pig manure. Anaerobic digestion (mesophilic/thermophilic), ammonia stripping, struvite precipitation and partial nitritation/anammox will be key technologies. To render the cradle-to-cradle approach complete, the fertilizer and potential trace contaminants effects of recovered nutrients on plant growth and soil health and emissions will established, and safety will be managed. Life cycle analyses will determine the sustainability of the concept as such, and identify the most environmentally friendly technology and most effective and safe reuse strategy. Finally, the boundaries of economic viability will be determined.


Objective The ToyBox proposal addresses KBBE-2009-2-1-03 - Behavioural models for prevention of obesity, with a particular focus on children. It will primary aim to influence childrens behaviours and prevent obesity in early childhood. Strategy The proposal will identify key behaviours related to early childhood obesity and their determinants and evaluate behavioural models and educational strategies. Based on the obtained insights at a local level, a multidisciplinary team will develop and implement a school based family involved intervention programme that could be applied on a European scale. Process, impact, outcome and cost-effectiveness evaluation will be conducted to support decision making for European Public Health Policy. Methods The combined use of Precede-Proceed Model and Intervention Mapping will provide the framework for the development, implementation and evaluation of the ToyBox intervention. To achieve this, the project will be subdivided into 10 WPs. This carefully planned stepwise approach will include systematic reviews, secondary analyses of existing data sets, focus group research and school policies overview. Consortium The ToyBox project consortium spans the necessary multidisciplinary variety of experts such as public health experts, epidemiologists, nutritionists, physical activity experts, pedagogists, psychologists, behavioural scientists, nutritionists, paediatricians, early childhood psychologists, health economists, totalling 15 partners, from 10 countries. The consortium, consists of 11 universities, 1 research institute, 2 advocacy groups and an SME representing all regions of Europe. The consortium has ample experience in conducting and coordinating multi-centre international research as well as undertaking dissemination activities to all relevant stakeholders.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2013-ITN | Award Amount: 3.87M | Year: 2013

The growth of advanced composites in construction in recent years has been spectacular, doubling in size in the last 10 years. This expansion has been largely due to the use of Fibre Reinforced Polymer reinforcement in structural applications and, although the current economic climate has seen a slowdown of the general construction market, the demand of composite products within the European construction market is estimated to grow and reach 3.1 billion by 2013. The on-going requirement for more durable structures and more efficient rehabilitation solutions is the key driving force behind the introduction of FRPs in the construction industry as reinforcing or strengthening material for concrete and masonry structures. In Europe alone, the annual cost of repair and maintenance of the infrastructure is estimated to be about 50% of the construction budget. Composite materials are readily used in a large number of applications and yet, a set of accepted design guidelines does not exist and most construction professionals are unaware of what composites are and rely on specialists who often use their own standards and guidelines. Moreover, little interaction exists between academia and industry and practical applications are time and again a reflection of a design approach instructed by conservative guidelines, which hinder innovation. The aim of the Network is to train researchers in the use of advanced composites for construction so as to develop and maintain a critical mass of research groups that will address the main scientific challenges in the field, enable the development of advanced material standards and design guidelines, co-ordinate European research, and offer a link between academia and industry. The Network will strengthen the European Research Area on composite reinforcements and will contribute to increase the competitiveness of the European construction industry worldwide.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-SA | Phase: KBBE.2010.4-03 | Award Amount: 1.21M | Year: 2011

The project objective is to establish a LAC-UE platform bringing together regional and continental organizations involved in research funding and implementation, as well as other relevant stakeholders from the public and private sector and the civil society, in an effort to generate relevant information for the design and implementation of specific plans and projects, included the needed R&D and set the basis for the establishments of an enabling policy and institutional environment, as well as, for the development and consolidation of the KBBE in both the regions. To achieve this aim the project activities are oriented to generate information relevant to KBBE related issues in LAC, to help establish a strategic reflection and analysis on KBBE opportunities and limitations in the region, to stimulate KBBE related research and development ALC-UE cooperation, and to insert the KBBE theme in ALC policy agendas. The proposed structure to implement these activities include (i) a partner consortium of ALC and EU organizations directly involved in different aspects of R&D and implementation of KBBE concepts in both regions, which will assume the projects operational responsibilities, with the French CIRAD as consortium coordinator, and (ii) a broader array of stakeholders (institutions public and private playing key roles in different aspects of the KBBE: R&D, policy advice, advocacy, key sectors representation, etc.) which will participate as platform members in accordance to their interests and areas of expertise. This platform will constitute the cornerstone of the project and will be convened regularly during the project to analyze information and options, identify possible scenarios and R&D and policy agendas, and institutional and other issues that could emerge as the discussion evolves. (iii) strategic and macro guidance of the project will be the responsibility of a Steering Committee integrated by people from ALC and UE with recognized experience and expe


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP.2011.3.2-1 | Award Amount: 5.58M | Year: 2012

In response to world-wide changes in the chemical/biopharmaceutical industry, new market requirements for specific end-use product properties as well as to stricter energy, safety and environmental constraints a revolutionary approach is needed regarding equipment design, plant operation and new production paradigms that will result in better products and processes. Process intensification (PI) is the key technological pathway to drastically improve the sustainability of the chemical and biopharmaceutical processes by replacing the existing, inefficient plant equipment with new, intensified operations. PI comprises the development of novel equipment and production methods that can bring dramatic improvements in manufacturing and processing and lead to safer, cleaner, smaller and cheaper production routes. PI is expected to open up the way for the production of new products, unblock the potential for plant operation under less stable conditions and reform entire business models to foster just-in-time or distributed production. In a series of recent publications and roadmaps, PI has been identified as the path for sustainable development. The OPTICO project aims at overcoming the present limitations on implementing PI by establishing a new methodological design approach for sustainable, intensified chemical/biopharmaceutical plant design and operation through a flexible, integrated multi-scale modeling framework coupled with advanced process analytics tools and modern optimization/control techniques. It is envisaged that, within a 3 year time frame, the proposed work will enable the innovative process design and promote a substantial improvement in chemical/biopharmaceutical plant efficiency by reducing energy consumption, operating costs, handled volumes and generated wastes as well as by improving the process efficiency and safety.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME | Phase: SME-1 | Award Amount: 1.50M | Year: 2011

The present project, ALL4REST, is focused on the development of comfort-improved rest systems, using non-obstrusive technologies that promote deeper, more restorative sleep and prevent nocturnal awakenings. The successful solutions will reduce awakenings and/or reduce time to sleep after an awakening and reduce sleep onset latency. Within the global comfort improvement, physical and thermal parameters will be investigated, establishing quantitative and qualitative evaluation of comfort and sleep quality system. To achieve it, use of biomaterials and research of new ones, eco-friendly technologies and processes in fabrics destined to rest will allow the development of new products focused on obtaining an improved rest system.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: EE-10-2014 | Award Amount: 1.37M | Year: 2015

At present, energy conservation campaigns provide households with a general awareness but do not provoke large scale behavior changes. The main goal of the STEP_BY_STEP is to maximize the number of households in a given area that significantly change their behaviour at home. Desired behaviour change includes reduced electricity consumption and the investment in energy efficient products and/or high quality renewable energy products. Communication strategies involving direct contact are typically more effective on behavioural change than mass media campaigns. Thus, a system will be put into place to make individual door-to-door contact with 80% of the households in a given area. Contrary to traditional door-to-door canvassing, often seen as a one-shot deal, our project solicits targeted households regularly through email or by phone and accompanies them over a 20 month period towards the adoption of energy-saving practices. To reduce the attitude-behaviour gap, our system uses proven communication techniques that push towards action. Households are regularly encouraged to try new ecological gestures adapted to their level of motivation. Feedback is given and social norms are used. Community-based social marketing strategies will be used to encourage energy-related investment decisions. Households likely to take individual investment decisions will be motivated to take such decisions benefiting from economies of scale and facilitated by other households experience. Institutional partners will launch their energy saving interventions amongst 9000 households in 4 European areas that represent diverse populations and communities. French SME E3D will provide a behavioral strategy along with a web based system for behavioral change developed within a research project. Partnered laboratories will analyze household energy saving behavior patterns based on profiles and will define the environmental and economic impact of the project. Power Link will ensure the dissemination.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2007.1.1 | Award Amount: 5.05M | Year: 2008

Thin client solutions (i.e. processing delegated primarily to a remote server) have been extremely successful in wired LAN settings, because of cost reductions, inherent data security and privacy, more efficient use of resources, and ubiquitous data and service access.\n\nDespite the successes in the wired scenario, solutions able to also perform well in a wireless wide area network, still do not exist because of the differences of characteristics in the network and devices. The ambition of MobiThin STREP project is to focus on extending existing wired thin client solutions to wireless mobile devices.\n\nIntelligent distribution of demanding services and all existing legacy applications to mobile devices over state-of-the-art telecommunications network, is a important rationale behind several research initiatives. Major blockers for this efficient high quality service delivery are concerned with the inherent characteristics of the wireless medium, as well with the resource constraints typical for wireless terminals (energy consumption and input-output mechanisms). MobiThin takes this challenge, pursuing thin client based solutions, optimized for wireless wide area networks.\n\nMobiThin driven by a strong consortium focused on thin client computing - will develop an end-to-end solution, and address all important blockers for the wide adoption of wireless thin client computing paradigm. These include architecture and technology issues (wireless medium optimization, dedicated video codec and user pattern research, software/middleware, performance and energy saving oriented solutions), as well as economic ones (business roles and models). In addition to making scientific and technological progress, the project will demonstrate an integrated prototype for the wireless thin client.\n\nCombined with the existing wired technologies the MobiThin impact is to:\no run your applications EVERYWHERE\no CONNECT mobile and wireless workers\no use every DEVICE on every network


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-TP | Phase: KBBE.2012.3.5-01 | Award Amount: 12.44M | Year: 2013

KillSpill delivers innovative (bio)technologies, which can be integrated to the real sequences of state-of-the-art actions used currently to cleanup oil spills. The catalogue of KillSpill products & technologies is based on a review of technology & knowledge gaps in approaches of oil spill disasters and brings appropriate tools for 1st response, follow-up, and longer-term actions, specifically tailored to the versatility of oil spills. KillSpill develops chemicals & biochemicals to be used for 1st response actions to disperse/emulsify oil and materials enabling the containment and sorption of oil, preparing the field for the follow-up actions. KillSpill develops (Bio)technologies aiming at intensified biodegradation processes by bioaugmentation/biostimulation as follow-up and longer term actions in aerobic/slight anoxic compartments. KillSpill develops (bio)technologies adapted for the remediation of anoxic/anaerobic fresh & chronically polluted sediments. KillSpill compiles knowledge on dispersion/sorption and biodegradation processes to produce multifunctional products, which are suited for follow-up and longer term actions. The multifunctional products address the necessity for integrated bioremediation (bioavailability, metabolic requirements, etc.) and are efficient along the whole redox gradient from surface water to sediments. The products/technologies are field-tested in open sea oil spills and large mesocosms to unravel the champions products & technologies. The (bio)tools are benchmarked with existing solutions using cutting-edge analytics, biosensors, and omics and checked for eco-efficiency to merit green label. KillSpill consortium is multidisciplinary and gathers 33 partners from 12 EU and EU-associated countries and USA; 18 research & academic institutions, 14 SMEs, and 1 association of oil spill companies work together with the support of a high level advisory board to cover the whole chain of oil spill (bio)remediation.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: ICT-25-2015 | Award Amount: 3.44M | Year: 2015

New computing paradigms are required to feed the next revolution in Information Technology. Machines need to be invented that can learn, but also handle vast amount of data. In order to achieve this goal and still reduce the energy footprint of Information and Communication Technology, fundamental hardware innovations must be done. A physical implementation natively supporting new computing methods is required. Most of the time, CMOS is used to emulate e.g. neuronal behavior, and is intrinsically limited in power efficiency and speed. Reservoir computing (RC) is one of the concepts that has proven its efficiency to perform tasks where traditional approaches fail. It is also one of the rare concepts of an efficient hardware realization of cognitive computing into a specific, silicon-based technology. Small RC systems have been demonstrated using optical fibers and bulk components. In 2014, optical RC networks based integrated photonic circuits were demonstrated. The PHRESCO project aims to bring photonic reservoir computing to the next level of maturity. A new RC chip will be co-designed, including innovative electronic and photonic component that will enable major breakthrough in the field. We will i) Scale optical RC systems up to 60 nodes ii) build an all-optical chip based on the unique electro-optical properties of new materials iii) Implement new learning algorithms to exploit the capabilities of the RC chip. The hardware integration of beyond state-of-the-art components with novel system and algorithm design will pave the way towards a new era of optical, cognitive systems capable of handling huge amount of data at ultra-low power consumption.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: WASTE-6b-2015 | Award Amount: 5.09M | Year: 2016

A shift towards a more circular economy is crucial to achieve more sustainable and inclusive growth. Our objective is to provide local and regional authorities with an innovative transdisciplinary open source geodesign decision support environment (GDSE) developed and implemented in living labs in six metropolitan areas. The GDSE allows creating integrated, place-based eco-innovative spatial development strategies aiming at a quantitative reduction of waste flows in the strategic interface of peri-urban areas. These strategies will promote the use of waste as a resource, thus support the on-going initiatives of the EC towards establishing a strong circular economy. The identification of such eco-innovative strategies will be based on the integration of life cycle thinking and geodesign to operationalise urban metabolism. Our approach differs from previous UM as we introduce a reversed material flow accounting to collect data accurate and detailed enough for the design of a variety of solutions to place-based challenges. The developed impact and decision models allow quantification and validation of alternative solution paths and therefore promote sustainable urban development built on near-field synergies between the built and natural environments. This will be achieved by quantifying and tracking essential resource flows, mapping and quantification of negative and positive effects of present and future resource flows, and the determination of a set of indicators to inform decision makers concerning the optimization of (re-)use of resources. The GDSE will be open source. With a budget of 5 million, REPAiR funds a consortium rich in experience in waste and resource management, spatial decision support, territorial governance, spatial planning and urban design, and has deep knowledge of the 6 case study areas. REPAiR is supported by a user board, of key stakeholders for the development of CE as well as local authorities, who are heavily involved in the GDSE testing.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: WASTE-7-2015 | Award Amount: 7.65M | Year: 2016

Continuing population and consumption growth are driving global food demand, with agricultural activity increasing to keep pace. Europe has a major agricultural waste problem, generating some 700 million tonnes of waste annually. There is an urgent need and huge opportunity to address the efficient use of agricultural wastes, co-products and by-products (AWCB) towards delivering sustainable value chains in the farming and processing sectors. As such, AgroCycle will convert low value agricultural waste into highly valuable products, achieving a 10% increase in waste recycling and valorisation by 2020. This will be achieved by developing a detailed and holistic understanding of the waste streams and piloting a key number of waste utilisation/valorisation pathways. It will bring technologies and systems from ~TRL4 to ~TRL7 within the 3 years of the project. A post-project commercialisation plan will bring commercially promising technologies/systems to TRL8 and TRL9, ensuring AgroCycle will have an enduring impact by achieving sustainable use of AWCB both inside and outside the agricultural sector, leading to the realisation of a Circular Economy. AgroCycle addresses wastes from several agricultural sectors: wine, olive oil, horticulture, fruit, grassland, swine, dairy and poultry. The AgroCycle consortium is a large (25) multi-national group (including China) comprising the necessary and relevant multi-actors (i.e. researchers; companies in the technical, manufacturing, advisory, retail sectors (Large and SMEs); lead users; end users; and trade/producer associations) for achieving the projects ambitions goals. Farmings unique regional (rural) location means that AgroCycle will help reduce the EUs Innovation Divide and address the Regional Smart Specialisation Strategies for each partner country: impact will be Regional with National and International dimensions. The presence of three partners from China ensures international synergies and a global impact.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: NMP-24-2015 | Award Amount: 9.80M | Year: 2016

The REvivED water project will establish electrodialysis (ED) as the new standard providing a source of safe, affordable, and cost-competitive drinking water, using less than half the energy required by state-of-the-art Reverse Osmosis (RO) plants. The innovations of the project constitute a technology platform with a very wide field of potential applications. All components and systems have reached at least TRL4 and will be further developed reaching at least TRL7. The main focus of the project will be on the following applications: 1. A simplified ED system that can be used for brackish water desalination (8 pilots in developing countries) or for tap-water softening (2 pilots in Germany and the Netherlands). 2. A multistage ED system for industrial-scale seawater desalination, which will be demonstrated to reach energy consumption as low as 1.5 kWh/m3 (1 pilot in the Netherlands). 3. Combinations of the multistage ED system with the latest salinity gradient power systems (Reverse ElectroDialysis - RED), which can further reduce energy consumption for seawater desalination to the region of 1 kWh/m3 (1 pilot in the Netherlands). 4. The versatile nature of the developed innovations will be demonstrated by testing their combinations with Reverse Osmosis (RO) systems (1 pilot in Spain). This will allow initial market introduction, without the need to replace the extensive RO infrastructure. The pilot systems in developing countries will be located in critical areas where the project partner PHAESUN has local offices in Africa (Eritrea, Ivory Coast, Somalia, Djibouti and Ethiopia), Asia (Dubai, and India) and Latin America (Panama). The consortium brings together leading partners covering the whole value chain and ensuring exploitation of the results. It is clearly industry driven, and it gives European industry the chance to take the lead of the ED revival and face the competition from the US that is also actively pursuing this important growth market.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: NMP-19-2015 | Award Amount: 7.97M | Year: 2016

The main goal of the LORCENIS project is to develop long reinforced concrete for energy infrastructures with lifetime extended up to a 100% under extreme operating conditions. The concept is based on an optimal combination of novel technologies involving customized methodologies for cost-efficient operation. 4 scenarios of severe operating conditions are considered: 1. Concrete infrastructure in deep sea, arctic and subarctic zones: Offshore windmills, gravity based structures, bridge piles and harbours 2. Concrete and mortar under mechanical fatigue in offshore windmills and sea structures 3. Concrete structures in concentrated solar power plants exposed to high temperature thermal fatigue 4. Concrete cooling towers subjected to acid attack The goal will be realized through the development of multifunctional strategies integrated in concrete formulations and advanced stable bulk concretes from optimized binder technologies. A multi-scale show case will be realized towards service-life prediction of reinforced concretes in extreme environments to link several model approaches and launch innovation for new software tools. The durability of sustainable advanced reinforced concrete structures developed will be proven and validated within LORCENIS under severe operating conditions based on the TRL scale, starting from a proof of concept (TRL 3) to technology validation (TRL 5). LORCENIS is a well-balanced consortium of multidisciplinary experts from 9 universities and research institutes and 7 industries whose 2 are SMEs from 8 countries who will contribute to training by exchange of personnel and joint actions with other European projects and increase the competitiveness and sustainability of European industry by bringing innovative materials and new methods closer to the marked and permitting the establishment of energy infrastructures in areas with harsh climate and environmental conditions at acceptable costs.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SC5-11e-2015 | Award Amount: 7.91M | Year: 2016

METGROW\ will address and solve bottlenecks in the European raw materials supply by developing innovative metallurgical technologies for unlocking the use of potential domestic raw materials. The METGROW\ consortium has received an EIP RM Commitment status. The consortium is supported by internationally respected research institutes and universities. Many of the partners (9) are members of EIT KIC Raw Materials consortium as well. The value chain and business models for metal recovery from low grade ores and wastes are carefully looked after. Within this project, both primary and secondary materials are studied as potential metal resources. Economically important nickel-cobalt deposits and low grade polymetallic wastes, iron containing sludges (goethite, jarosite etc.) which are currently not yet being exploited due to technical bottlenecks, are in focus. Concurrently, METGROW\ targets innovative hydrometallurgical processes to extract important metals including Ni, Cu, Zn, Co, In, Ga, Ge from low grade ores in a cost-effective way. In addition a toolbox for metallurgical system is created in the project using new methods and combinations. The unused potential of metal containing fine grained industrial residues are evaluated, while hybrid and flexible hydrometallurgical processes and treatment methods of fines are developed for both materials. Training and education of new professionals are facilitated within the METGROW\ project. The knowledge of raw materials and sustainable technologies will attract new talents in the field who can flexibly change fields from treatment of secondary to primary resources, which also smoothens the economic ups and downs in the primary sector.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.93M | Year: 2015

The aim of the project Euro-Sequences is to establish a multidisciplinary training network on the emerging topic of sequence-controlled polymers. It has been shown during the last 5 years that such polymers open up unprecedented options for the future of manmade materials. Indeed, similarly to biopolymers such as DNA and proteins, synthetic sequence-controlled polymers contain precisely engineered chain-microstructures that allow a fine control over their molecular, nanoscopic and macroscopic properties. For instance, these new types of polymers are relevant for applications in molecular data storage, catalysis, and nanomedicine. However, this field of research is young and therefore, fundamental and applied research is still mandatory. Thus, it seems timely and appropriate to federate top-European researchers working on that topic. The proposed network is composed of 7 academic partners and 2 companies and connects researchers with complementary expertise in areas such as organic chemistry, polymer synthesis, supramolecular chemistry, physico-chemistry and materials science. This multidisciplinary network will focus on different scientific aspects. A first important objective will be the development of facile and rapid chemical methods for writing molecular information on polymers. In addition, analytical techniques that allow characterization and sequencing of polymers will be studied. The folding and self-assembly of sequence-controlled polymers will be also examined in order to understand the correlation between controlled primary structure and higher levels of organization. Eventually, a crucial aim of this project will be the conception of new types of plastics materials. This network will be a unique scientific environment for training PhDs. The students will conduct their research in top-European laboratories and will receive a complete training, including lectures and summer schools, on polymer chemistry, supramolecular chemistry and biomaterials.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EINFRA-9-2015 | Award Amount: 7.64M | Year: 2015

OpenDreamKit will deliver a flexible toolkit enabling research groups to set up Virtual Research Environments, customised to meet the varied needs of research projects in pure mathematics and applications and supporting the full research life-cycle from exploration, through proof and publication, to archival and sharing of data and code. OpenDreamKit will be built out of a sustainable ecosystem of community-developed open software, databases, and services, including popular tools such as LinBox, MPIR, Sage(sagemath.org), GAP, PariGP, LMFDB, and Singular. We will extend the Jupyter Notebook environment to provide a flexible UI. By improving and unifying existing building blocks, OpenDreamKit will maximise both sustainability and impact, with beneficiaries extending to scientific computing, physics, chemistry, biology and more and including researchers, teachers, and industrial practitioners. We will define a novel component-based VRE architecture and the adapt existing mathematical software, databases, and UI components to work well within it on varied platforms. Interfaces to standard HPC and grid services will be built in. Our architecture will be informed by recent research into the sociology of mathematical collaboration, so as to properly support actual research practice. The ease of set up, adaptability and global impact will be demonstrated in a variety of demonstrator VREs. We will ourselves study the social challenges associated with large-scale open source code development and of publications based on executable documents, to ensure sustainability. OpenDreamKit will be conducted by a Europe-wide demand-steered collaboration, including leading mathematicians, computational researchers, and software developers long track record of delivering innovative open source software solutions for their respective communities. All produced code and tools will be open source.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-EJD | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-EJD | Award Amount: 3.72M | Year: 2016

In many cases energy, water and resources contained in wastewater may have significant value if recovered. Therefore, the EU is currently confronted with a paradigm shift from wastewater treatment to resource recovery. To facilitate this shift, the SuPER-W European Joint Doctorate programme trains early-stage researchers (ESRs) in developing technologies for water, energy, nutrient and metal reuse, and bioproduction from (waste)water. The ESRs obtain knowledge and skills needed to turn environmental problems into economic opportunities. SuPER-W focuses not only on technology development through research, but the ESRs are also trained in translating research into policy, creative problem-solving, identification of bottlenecks for effective implementation of resource recovery technologies, development of business cases and urban/industrial ecosystems, and assessment of sustainability and the role of public perception and policy in innovation. Furthermore, they acquire a set of commercial, entrepreneurial and managerial skills that prepare them as future leaders. All ESRs are supervised by at least 2 promoters from 2 universities and co-supervised by a researcher from a non-academic partner organisation. Moreover, they conduct an internship in the non-academic sector in the first and last project year, contributing to more effective dissemination and exploitation of their research results. To organise the training, SuPER-W brings together leading researchers from 5 renowned universities and 12 associated non-academic partner organisations, including industrial partners involved in technology development, SMEs focused on consultancy/engineering, a service provider, a government agency, and professional network organisations. ESRs who successfully defend the PhD thesis and finish the doctoral training programme receive a double or joint PhD degree, jointly awarded by the universities of his/her promoters, as well as a joint doctoral training certificate of SuPER-W.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SPIRE-04-2016 | Award Amount: 6.88M | Year: 2016

The objective of the project IMPROOF is to drastically improve the energy efficiency of steam cracking furnaces by at least 20%, in a cost effective way, while simultaneously reducing emissions of greenhouse gasses and NOx per ton ethylene produced by at least 25%. One important way to reduce the energy input in steam cracking furnaces is to reduce coke formation on the reactor wall. The use of either advanced coil materials, combined with 3D reactor designs, improved process control, and more uniform heat transfer will increase run lengths, reducing simultaneously CO2 emissions and the lifetime of the furnaces. Biogas and bio-oil will be used as alternative fuels because they are considered renewable, and hence, decrease net CO2 production. Application of high emissivity coatings on the external surface of the radiant coils will further substantially improve the energy consumption. Less firing is required to reach the same process temperatures in the radiant coils. This will reduce fuel gas consumption and CO2 emissions by 10 to 15%. IMPROOF will demonstrate the advantage of combining all these technological innovations with an anticipated increase of the time on stream with a factor 3. To select the correct technologies for sustainable implementation in complex plant-wide and industrial data-intensive process systems, all the technology will be implanted in real-plant conditions at TRL6 in DOW. The strongly industrial oriented consortium is composed of 7 industrial partners, including 2 SME completed by 2 RTO and 2 university. This partnership shows a clear and strong path to the industrial and economical world with the involvement of all actors of the furnaces business. The financial resources mobilized by the partners represent a total grant of 6 878 401,25 with a global effort of 538 person.month.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: EE-04-2016-2017 | Award Amount: 4.26M | Year: 2016

The MPC-: GT project brought together a transdisciplinary team of SMEs, large industry and research institutes, experienced in research and application of design and control systems in the combined building and energy world. Based on prior research, supported by (joint) EU and national projects, and practical experience the bottlenecks where identified that prevent at this moment a real breakthrough of geothermal heat pumps (GEO-HP) combined with thermally activated building systems (TABS) - GEOTABS. Solutions, which need to be implemented in an integrated way, were identified and sufficient proof of concept was gathered to join forces in a RIA. The innovative concepts aim at increasing the share of low valued (low-grade) energy sources by means of using low exergy systems on the one hand and aim at upgrading low/moderate temperature resources on the other hand. The overall solution consists of an optimal integration of GEOTABS and secondary supply and emission systems. To allow for an optimal use of both the GEOTABS and the secondary system, a split will be made between a so-called base load that will be provided by the GEOTABS and the remaining energy needs that should be supplied by the secondary system. A generic rule, eliminating case-by-case simulation work, will be developed. The second part of the proposed solution aims at a white box approach for Model Predictive Control (MPC) to generate a controller model with precomputed model inputs such as disturbances and HVAC thermal power to avoid case by case development. Research is needed to assess the overall performance and robustness of such an approach towards uncertainties. As such, the MPC-: GT consortium believes to have identified an integrated solution that will provide a near optimal design strategy for the MPC GEOTABS concept using optimal control integrated design. The solution will support the industry, especially the SME members, to expand their activities and strengthen their competitiveness.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: NFRP-09-2015 | Award Amount: 11.99M | Year: 2015

The Strategic Research Agenda of the EU Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technical platform requires new large infrastructures for its successful deployment. MYRRHA has been identified as a long term supporting research facility for all ESNII systems and as such put in the high-priority list of ESFRI. The goal of MYRTE is to perform the necessary research in order to demonstrate the feasibility of transmutation of high-level waste at industrial scale through the development of the MYRRHA research facility. Within MYRRHA as a large research facility, the demonstration of the technological performance of transmutation will be combined with the use for the production of radio-isotopes and as a material testing for nuclear fission and fusion applications. Numerical studies and experimental facilities are foreseen to reach this goal. Besides coordination, international collaboration and dissemination activities, the MYRTE proposal contains 5 technical work packages. The first and largest work-package is devoted to the realisation of the injector part of the MYRRHA accelerator to demonstrate the feasibility and required reliability of this non-semi-conducting part of the accelerator. The second work-package addresses the main outstanding technical issues in thermal hydraulics by numerical simulations and experimental validation. Pool thermal hydraulics and thermal hydraulics of the fuel assembly will be the focus of this WP. In the WP on LBE Chemistry, the evaporation from LBE, capture and deposition of Po and fission products will be studied in detail to complement the safety report. A small dedicated WP on experimental reactor physics is also foreseen to allow carrying out the necessary supplementary experiments at the GUINEVERE-facility to address the questions of the safety authorities. In a last WP, advanced studies on Americium-bearing oxide fuel are carried out to demonstrate the capability of developing minor actinide fuel for transmutation.


Patent
Basf, Vib Vzw and Ghent University | Date: 2011-08-31

The present invention relates generally to the field of molecular biology and concerns a method for enhancing various economically important yield-related traits in plants. More specifically, the present invention concerns a method for enhancing yield-related traits in plants by modulating expression in a plant of a nucleic acid encoding an POI (Protein Of Interest) polypeptide. The present invention also concerns plants having modulated expression of a nucleic acid encoding an POI polypeptide, which plants have enhanced yield-related traits relative to control plants. The invention also provides hitherto unknown POI-encoding nucleic acids, and constructs comprising the same, useful in performing the methods of the invention.


Patent
Basf, Ghent University and Vib Vzw | Date: 2015-05-27

The present invention relates generally to the field of molecular biology and concerns a method for improving various economically important growth characteristics in plants. More specifically, the present invention concerns inter alia a method for modifying growth characteristics in plants by modulating expression in a plant of a nucleic acid encoding a HUB1 (Histone Monoubiquitination 1) polypeptide or encoding another protein useful in the methods of the present invention. The modified growth characteristics comprise a modification of light regulated phenotypes, such as modified circadian clock and/or circadian clock responses, or modified plant architecture.


Ginhoux F.,Shanghai JiaoTong University | Guilliams M.,Inflammation Research Center | Guilliams M.,Ghent University
Immunity | Year: 2016

Defining the origins and developmental pathways of tissue-resident macrophages should help refine our understanding of the role of these cells in various disease settings and enable the design of novel macrophage-targeted therapies. In recent years the long-held belief that macrophage populations in the adult are continuously replenished by monocytes from the bone marrow (BM) has been overturned with the advent of new techniques to dissect cellular ontogeny. The new paradigm suggests that several tissue-resident macrophage populations are seeded during waves of embryonic hematopoiesis and self-maintain independently of BM contribution during adulthood. However, the exact nature of the embryonic progenitors that give rise to adult tissue-resident macrophages is still debated, and the mechanisms enabling macrophage population maintenance in the adult are undefined. Here, we review the emergence of these concepts and discuss current controversies and future directions in macrophage biology. © 2016 Elsevier Inc.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: NMP-2010-3.4-1 | Award Amount: 7.82M | Year: 2011

The goal of 3D-LightTrans project is to provide groundbreaking, highly flexible and adaptable low-cost technologies for manufacturing of 3D textile reinforced plastic composites (in the following referred to as textile reinforced plastics or TRP), including innovative approaches for the individual processes and its integration in complete manufacturing chains, which will enable to shift them from its current position in cost intensive, small series niche markets, to broadly extended mass product applications, not only in transportation, but also in other key sectors, like health and leisure. To fulfil this goal, 3D-LightTrans manufacturing chains will based on hybrid yarn incorporating thermoplastic matrix material, processed to deep draped multilayer textiles and multifunctional 3D-textile constructions, which will be fixed to dry pre-forms and finally, processed into composites by thermoforming. By integrating these new, innovative process steps with full automation in -nowadays mostly manually performed- complex handling operations, it will be possible to obtain a fully automated and highly adaptable manufacturing chain. 3D-LightTrans will open the way to a totally new concept for the design, manufacturing and application of composites for low-cost mass products in a wide range of sectors. The Consortium brings together multidisciplinary research teams involving five industrial stakeholders from machine tools and machine automation (P-D Glasseiden, Van de Wiele, Lindauer Dornier, Coatema) and several OEM active in the field of processing of flexible materials and composite manufacturing, including Federal Mogul, among others, as well as from the application sector (FIAT and Bentley), and extensive expertise from well known research specialists in the area of materials, production research and technical textiles in particular, like AIT, TU-Dresden and University of Ghent.


Epilog, a spin-off from imec and Ghent University, is launching its platform that improves epilepsy diagnosis through an automated service that accurately and efficiently analyzes large amounts of EEG-data. The new platform enables doctors to make well-informed patient treatment decisions. Proven in clinical trials and welcomed by the physician community, interest in Epilog has grown internationally, and to-date, the solution is being tested in seven hospitals within Europe. Epilepsy, a condition characterized by uncontrolled brain activity, is a complex pathology that occurs in many different forms. The screening and treatment of epilepsy is a difficult and time-consuming process. Moreover, about one third of the patients suffer from so-called pharmaco-resistant epilepsy, meaning that they cannot be treated with medication. Brain surgery is currently the best treatment for these patients, however, hospitals are faced with long waiting lists and limited resources that result in treatment delays of up to a year or more. "The electroencephalogram, or EEG, is one of the cornerstone techniques to diagnose epilepsy," stated Gregor Strobbe, co-founder of Epilog. "Unfortunately, the interpretation of EEG data is a labor-intensive and subjective process. Epilog's technology can automatically detect epileptic phenomena in the EEG recordings and localize their origin in the patient's brain. The doctor can use this information to make the most well-informed treatment decision, such as medication or brain surgery." Using the Epilog service is easy: Epilog receives the EEG-data of the patient, analyzes the data and provides a standardized report with the results. The platform architecture is entirely cloud-based, allowing time-efficient detection and 3-D visualization of the epileptic phenomena. Furthermore, the Epilog services are user-friendly and overcome the need for hospitals to invest in technical know-how and computation power. To-date, 75 test cases have been offered to Epilog and the results have been very promising. In a retrospective study it has been shown that Epilog's technology achieves a sensitivity of 86% to localize the epileptic focus in the patient's brain. "The reliablity of our results stems from more than 10 years of research in optimizing EEG analysis methods at Ghent University," explained Pieter van Mierlo, co-founder of Epilog. "Thanks to our close collaboration with Ghent University Hospital, we have gained a multitude of insight. Currently, physicians are testing our solution in hospitals across Europe and we anticipate being a key technology that supports their treatment of epilepsy patients." With the financial support and guidance of investors Walter Mastelinck, founder and CEO of Transics, and Patrick Keereman, CEO of Molecubes, Epilog has now started commercializing its software. CE and FDA labeling is also in progress, to allow introduction into the international epilepsy market. "Epilog is at the precipice of a new generation of technologies that improve neurological disease diagnosis," commented Vincent Keeremen, co-founder of Epilog. "Our intention is to use our platform to tackle other applications in neurology. Early detection of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, or the prediction of the efficacy of neurological medication may be feasible and therefore, advance treatment."


News Article | November 27, 2016
Site: www.gizmag.com

Global efforts to extract energy from sewage in forms such as heat, biogas and even electricity may get a boost thanks to the work of a team of biochemists and microbiologists from Ghent University in Belgium, who are collaborating on a pilot project with DC Water in Washington DC. Sewage from bathrooms and kitchens is a potential energy source because it contains various organic substances suspended in wastewater. If we want sewage treatment to be truly self-sustaining, the trick will be to find an efficient way to separate the organic matter from the wastewater – that way the wastewater can be recycled, and the organic matter can be used to generate bioenergy. Currently, the overall principle of most sewage treatment plants revolves around optimizing the way microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi and protozoans feed on the organic contaminants in wastewater. As the microorganisms eat the organic matter, they form particles that clump together and settle at the bottom of a tank, allowing a relatively clear liquid to be separated from the solids and further purified. This often includes a step called "contact stabilization," which involves using two aeration tanks to ensure the microorganisms are as active as possible before introducing them to the next batch of effluent needing treatment. At the moment, the overall sewage treatment process recovers around 20 to 30 percent of the organic matter within the sewage mix. Dr Francis Meerburg, a researcher on the Belgian project, said their aim was to improve the way bacteria captures organic material. "We periodically starve the bacteria, in a kind of 'fasting regimen'," explains Professor Nico Boon. "Afterwards, wastewater is briefly brought into contact with the starved bacteria which are gluttonous and gobble up the organic matter without ingesting all of it. This enables us to harvest the undigested materials for the production of energy and high-quality products. We [then] starve the rest of the bacteria, so they can purify fresh sewage again." This new method can recover more than 55 percent of the organic matter from the sewage, which is a big improvement over current rates of 20 to 30 percent. According to the team's calculations, this amount should provide enough energy to completely treat sewage without the need for external electricity sources. "We're not going to solve climate change with our process, but every bit helps," Vlaeminck says. "For comparison: in our region of six million people (in Flanders), the energy usage of our sewage treatment municipality, Aquafin, corresponds to the residential electricity use of more than 690,000 people (more than 10 percent of the population). This gives an idea on the energy saving potential and impact, if all sewage treatment would be energy neutral." As a clear sign that there's a strong appetite for more efficient, affordable and sustainable processes in wastewater treatment, the team's work has gone directly from the lab to a large-scale application in the USA's capital city. The researchers are currently collaborating with DC Water (the District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority) to implement the new process on a part of the plant's full-scale water treatment installation. The next step is to evaluate how well the process can help achieve more efficient wastewater treatment on a large scale.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.techrepublic.com

You've probably seen the adorable story of Derby the dog, who was born disabled but received some incredible 3D printed prosthetic legs that allowed him to run again. The story went viral in late 2014 and, in many ways, changed how the world looked at the potential for 3D printing. After all, when our beloved pups are involved, we begin to take things pretty seriously. Little did the world know that 3D Systems, who made those prosthetics, had another advancement for dogs in the works. The 3D printing company partnered with Rita Leibinger Medical to create and print metal orthopedic knee implants to fix a very common, but difficult problem of injuries in dogs' hind leg ligaments, often caused by trauma, degeneration, or genetics. "With this implant we experienced faster, more successful surgery and a faster recovery period," Rita Leibinger, owner and founder of Rita Leibinger Medical, said in a press release. To date, 3D Systems has made more than 10,000 of the implants, allowing the dogs to walk about six weeks after surgery, and it has made the process much more efficient for veterinarians as well. The partnership between 3D Systems and Rita Leibinger Medical, which is headquartered in Germany, started in 2012. Peter Mercelis, technology and application developer manager at 3D Systems, said that Rita Leibinger Medical immediately realized the possibilities of 3D printing and started to work on improvement of the classic TTA (Tibial Tuberosity Advancement) implants and procedure to create TTA Rapid Implants 2. By reorganizing the bone force and making the knee more stable, the implant can fix the problem without the vet needing to repair the ligament. The classic TTA surgical procedure involved the use of a large fixation plate, which is now obsolete because of the new developments in this technology. The titanium implant has an open structure that promotes rapid bone ingrowth, as well as less of a risk of infection. The new implants were developed by a small team of engineers from both companies. They went through about four design iterations "to improve the ease of the surgical procedure, the long term bone-ingrowth, and the appearance and the manufacturing costs," Mercelis said. Because 3D printing has such short lead times, those iterations could be done on a short-term basis, and sometimes in parallel. Dr. Yves Samoy, from Ghent University in Belgium, perfected the surgical procedure, and worked with 3D Systems' manufacturing facility in Belgium to scale up the prototyping. Of course, dogs aren't the best at being patient and resting when they need to. So, every time one can get back to full speed after surgery, it's considered a success story. "The dog owners and even the vets are really surprised to see the dogs recover this fast from an orthopedic surgical procedure," Mercelis said. Although much smaller than human healthcare, the animal healthcare market is a multi-billion dollar industry — and implant costs make up a huge portion of that. With 3D printing, the total cost of the procedure is reduced, and even better, it is also less invasive. The TTA Rapid Implants 2 will also be more widely available, and the two companies are working on scaling them down for smaller dogs and cats, too. They are also working on other implants, which will become commercially available soon. "The complex geometries, large size and weight differences of the patients are all in favor of 3D printing technology," Mercelis said. "3D Systems and Rita Leibinger Medical are currently already working on the next success stories, by developing several spinal implants." Because we can all always use more dog videos in our lives, check out 3D Systems' short video showcasing the 10,000 happy dogs that have benefitted from this new implant.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Inspired by the hair of blue tarantulas, researchers from The University of Akron lead a team that made a structural-colored material that shows consistent color from all viewing directions. This finding overturns the conventional wisdom that long-range order photonic structures are always iridescent, opening new potential to mass produce structural colors because highly ordered designs are easy to scale-up and manufacture. Bor-Kai (Bill) Hsiung and his colleagues at UA, Ghent University, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln published their research, which is featured on the cover of the January 2017 journal of Advanced Optical Materials. "Structural colors are more vibrant and durable than the pigments used in most human-made products," explained Hsiung, the lead author of this research and a Biomimicry Fellow in the Integrated Bioscience Ph.D. program at The University of Akron. "They are produced by optical effects when light interacts with nanostructures that are about the same size as the wavelength of light." Think of a peacock, or a butterfly. The problem is that most structural colors are strongly iridescent, changing color when viewed from different angles. It's beautiful out in nature, but not very functional when we're watching television and we move to a new seat." The team first discovered that many vibrant blue tarantulas do not show iridescence even though the spiders use nanostructures to produce those colors. Since the spider's blue color is not iridescent, Hsiung's team suggested that the same process could be applied to make pigment replacements that never fade, as well as to help reduce glare on wide-angle viewing systems in phones, televisions and other devices. As they dug deeper, they found that the hairs of some species of blue tarantulas show a special flower-like shape that they hypothesized reduced the iridescent effect resulting from periodic structures. Then, thanks to the crowdfunding push they received earlier, they were able to test this hypothesis using a series of computer simulations and physical prototypes built using cutting-edge nano-3D printing technology. Their color produced by the 3D printed structures has a viewing angle of 160 degrees, the largest viewing angle of any synthetic structural colors demonstrated. "These structural colorants could be used as pigment replacements - many of which are toxic - in materials such as plastics, metal, textiles and paper, and for producing color for wide-angle viewing systems such as phones and televisions," Hsiung said.


News Article | December 20, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

JUPITER, FL - Dec. 20, 2016 - Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed an efficient process to rapidly discover new "enediyne natural products" from soil microbes that could be further developed into extremely potent anticancer drugs. The study highlights microbial natural products as abundant sources of new drug leads. The researchers' discovery process involves prioritizing the microbes from the TSRI strain collection and focusing on the ones that are genetically predisposed to produce specific families of natural products. The scientists say this process saves time and resources in comparison to the traditional approaches used to identify these rare molecules. The study, led by TSRI Professor Ben Shen, was published today in the journal mBio. Shen and his colleagues uncovered a new family of enediyne natural products, called tiancimycins, (TNMs) which kill selected cancer cells more rapidly and completely in comparison to toxic molecules used in FDA-approved antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs)-- monoclonal antibodies attached to cytotoxic drugs that target only cancer cells. The scientists also discovered several new producers of C-1027, an antitumor antibiotic currently in clinical development, which can produce C-1027 at much higher levels. It has been more than a decade since Shen first reported on the C-1027 enediyne biosynthetic machinery, and he speculated then that the knowledge obtained from studying biosynthesis of C-1027, and other enediynes, could be used for the discovery of novel enediyne natural products. "The enediynes represent one of the most fascinating families of natural products for their extraordinary biological activities," Shen said. "By surveying 3,400 strains from the TSRI collection, we were able to identify 81 strains that harbor genes encoding enediynes. With what we know, we can predict novel structural insights that can be exploited to radically accelerate enediyne-based drug discovery and development." "The work described by the Shen group is an excellent example of what can be achieved by coupling state of the art genomic analyses of potential biosynthetic clusters and modern physicochemical techniques," said David J. Newman, retired chief of the National Cancer Institute's Natural Products Branch. "As a result of their work, the potential number of enediynes has significantly increased." Shen's method of strain prioritization and genome mining means a far more efficient use of resources involved in the discovery process, targeting only those strains that look to produce the most important natural compounds. "This study shows that the potential to rapidly discover new enediyne natural products from a large strain collection is within our reach," said TSRI Research Associate Xiaohui Yan, one of four first authors of the study. "We also show the feasibility of manipulating tiancimycin biosynthesis in vivo, which means that sufficient quantities of these precious natural products can be reliably produced by microbial fermentation for drug development and eventual commercialization." In addition to Shen and Yan, first authors of the study, "Strain Prioritization and Genome Mining for Enediyne Natural Products," include TSRI's Huiming Ge, Tingting Huang and Hindra. Other authors include Dong Yang, Qihui Teng, Ivana Crnovči?, Xiuling Li, Jeffrey D. Rudolf, Jeremy R. Lohman and Christoph Rader of TSRI; Yannick Gansemans and Filip Van Nieuwerburgh of Ghent University, Belgium; Yanwen Duan, Xiangcheng Zhu and Yong Huang of Xiangya International Academy of Translational Medicine, Central South University, China; Li-Xing Zhao and Yi Jiang of Yunnan University, China. The study was supported in part by the Chinese Ministry of Education (111 Project B08034), National High Technology Joint Research Program of China (grant 2011ZX09401-001), National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (grant 2012AA02A705), the National Institutes of Health (grants CA78747 and GM115575), the German Research Foundation and the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation. The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) is one of the world's largest independent, not-for-profit organizations focusing on research in the biomedical sciences. TSRI is internationally recognized for its contributions to science and health, including its role in laying the foundation for new treatments for cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, hemophilia, and other diseases. An institution that evolved from the Scripps Metabolic Clinic founded by philanthropist Ellen Browning Scripps in 1924, the institute now employs more than 2,500 people on its campuses in La Jolla, CA, and Jupiter, FL, where its renowned scientists--including two Nobel laureates and 20 members of the National Academy of Science, Engineering or Medicine--work toward their next discoveries. The institute's graduate program, which awards PhD degrees in biology and chemistry, ranks among the top ten of its kind in the nation. For more information, see http://www. .


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: SFS-16-2015 | Award Amount: 6.92M | Year: 2016

PROMISS (PRevention Of Malnutrition In Senior Subjects in the EU) is a multi-country project aiming to turn the challenge of tackling malnutrition in community-dwelling older persons into an opportunity for healthy ageing for the future. The PROMISS consortium contains worldwide expertise in epidemiology, clinical trials, geriatrics, nutrition, physical activity, microbiomics, as well as in behaviour, consumer, sensory and computer sciences. It builds on strong collaborations with food industry and SMEs to strengthen innovation of the European agri-food sector and their market position. Existing data from scientifically well-established prospective aging cohorts and national nutritional surveys from Europe and third countries will be combined with new data from short- and long-term intervention studies in older persons at risk. Its holistic approach will provide insight in the causality of the links between diet, physical activity, appetite and malnutrition and underlying pathways, thereby providing the necessary evidence to develop optimal, sustainable and evidence-based dietary and physical activity strategies to prevent malnutrition and enhance active and healthy aging. PROMISS will also deliver food concepts and products as well as persuasive technology to support adherence to these strategies. The dietary and physical activity strategies and food products will be specifically developed with older user involvement to meet the needs and fit the preferences of older consumers. In close collaboration with stakeholders, PROMISS will translate these strategies into practical recommendations to guide policy and health professionals at EU- and Member States level. Dissemination and implementation takes place through strong dissemination partners operating on an European level and linked to national networks across Member States. PROMISS promises prevention of malnutrition, additional healthy life years and a strengthening of EUs food industry.


Janssens S.,Ghent University | Tinel A.,Debiopharm SA
Cell Death and Differentiation | Year: 2012

P53-induced protein with a death domain (PIDD) was cloned as a death domain (DD)-containing protein whose expression is induced by p53. It was later described as the core of a molecular platform-activating caspase-2, named the PIDDosome. These first results pointed towards a role for PIDD in apoptosis, in response to DNA damage. Identification of new PIDDosome complexes involved in DNA repair and nuclear factor-κB signaling challenged this early concept. PIDD functions are growing as new complexes and new interaction partners are being discovered, and as additional functions are being revealed. A fascinating feature of PIDD lies within its complex and tight regulation mechanisms, which allow the molecule to fine-tune its different functions: from transcriptional regulation to the expression of different isoforms, and from the interaction with regulatory proteins to an ingenious post-translational cleavage mechanism generating various active fragments with specific functions. Further studies still need to be carried out to provide answers to many unresolved issues and to reconcile conflicting results. This review aims at providing an overview of the current PIDD knowledge status. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited All rights reserved.


Chirinos J.A.,University of Pennsylvania | Segers P.,Ghent University
Hypertension | Year: 2010

The mechanical load imposed by the systemic circulation to the left ventricle is an important determinant of normal and abnormal cardiovascular function. Left ventricular afterload is determined by complex time-varying phenomena, which affect pressure and flow patterns generated by the pumping ventricle. Left ventricular afterload is best described in terms of pressure-flow relations, allowing for quantification of various components of load using simplified biomechanical models of the circulation, with great potential for mechanistic understanding of the role of central hemodynamics in cardiovascular disease and the effects of therapeutic interventions. In the second part of this tutorial, we review analytic methods used to characterize left ventricular afterload, including analyses of central arterial pressure-flow relations and windkessel modeling (pressure-volume relations). Conceptual descriptions of various models and methods are emphasized over mathematical ones. Our review is aimed at helping researchers and clinicians obtain and interpret results from analyses of left ventricular afterload in clinical and epidemiological settings. © 2010 American Heart Association, Inc.


Chirinos J.A.,University of Pennsylvania | Segers P.,Ghent University
Hypertension | Year: 2010

The mechanical load imposed by the systemic circulation to the left ventricle is an important determinant of normal and abnormal cardiovascular function. Left ventricular afterload is determined by complex time-varying phenomena, which affect pressure and flow patterns generated by the pumping ventricle and cannot be expressed as a single numeric measure or described in terms of pressure alone. Left ventricular afterload is best described in terms of pressure-flow relations. High-fidelity arterial applanation tonometry can be used to record time-resolved central pressure noninvasively, whereas contemporary noninvasive imaging techniques, such as Doppler echocardiography and phase-contrast MRI, allow for accurate assessments of aortic flow. Central pressure and flow can be analyzed using simplified biomechanical models to characterize various components of afterload, with great potential for mechanistic understanding of the role of central hemodynamics in cardiovascular disease and the effects of therapeutic interventions. In the first part of this tutorial, we review noninvasive techniques for central pressure and flow measurements and basic concepts of wave conduction and reflection as they relate to the interpretation of central pressure-flow relations. Conceptual descriptions of various models and methods are emphasized over mathematical ones. Our review is aimed at helping researchers and clinicians apply and interpret results obtained from analyses of left ventricular afterload in clinical and epidemiological settings. © 2010 American Heart Association, Inc.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.3.5 | Award Amount: 3.39M | Year: 2011

The NAVOLCHI project explores, develops and demonstrates a novel nano-scale plasmonic chip-to-chip and system-in-package interconnection platform to overcome the bandwidth, foot-print and power consumption limitations of todays electrical and optical interconnect solutions. The technology exploits the ultra-compact dimensions and fast electronic interaction times offered by surface plasmon polaritons to build plasmonic transceivers with a few square-micron footprints and speeds only limited by the RC constants. Key elements developed in this project are monolithically integrated plasmonic lasers, modulators, amplifiers and detectors on a CMOS platform. The transceivers will be interconnected by free space and fiber connect schemes. The plasmonic transceiver concept aims at overcoming the challenges posed by the need for massive parallel interchip communications. Yet, it is more fundamental as the availability of cheap miniturized transmitters and detectors on a single chip will enable new applications in sensing, biomedical testing and many other fields where masses of lasers and detectors are need to e.g. analyze samples. Economically, the suggested technology is a viable approach for a massive monolithic integration of optoelectronic functions on Si substrates as it relies to the most part on the standardized processes offered by the silicon industry. In addition, the design and production cost of plasmonic devices are extremely low and with the dimension 100 times smaller over conventional devices they will require much lower energy to transfer data over short ranges of multi-processor cluster systems. The project is disruptive and challenging but it is clearly within the area of expertise of the consortium. It actually builds on the partners prior art such as demonstration of the first nano-scale plasmonic pillar laser. This project has the potential to create novel high-impact technologies by taking advantage of the manifold possibilities offered by plasmonic effects.


Patent
Ghent University and Steerable Instruments Bvba | Date: 2012-09-05

The present invention relates to an implantable catheter (100) provided for insertion through a wall (50) of a dural venous sinus (70) in a subject, having a proximal (20) and distal end (30), comprising: a tubular shaft (10) for insertion through the wall (50) of the venous sinus (70) into the sinus (52), provided with a shaft lumen (12) in fluid connection with a proximal port (14) at the proximal end and a distal port (16) at the distal end of the shaft (10), and a stop element (40) disposed on an outer surface of the tubular shaft (10), configured to limit the depth of insertion of the tubular shaft (10) into the sinus.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: NMBP-02-2016 | Award Amount: 7.69M | Year: 2017

The main objective of this proposal is to develop reliable GaN-based power devices and systems for high and medium power electronics targeting industrial and automotive applications and bringing the GaN power devices another step towards the wide usability in the energy saving environment to further tap the full potential which this new material brings along. This proposal addresses two subjects, one of which is medium power (till 10kW) GaN-on-Si based lateral HEMT structures, with special focus on high reliability, which is still a major blocking item to allow wide-spread market adoption. Hence, the impact of the GaN material quality, in combination with the device layout in view of long-term reliability will be addressed. The project aims an in-depth reliability study and qualification strategy development whereby the study of the impact of dislocations and other structural disturbances inside the materials on the long term device reliability will be specifically addressed. In addition, this proposal aims to demonstrate new device concepts with increased robustness and reliability, which will be realized, evaluated and tested thoroughly. This will demonstrate how it is possible to overcome the known limitations of the GaN on Silicon technology, like e.g. the vertical leakage, trapping phenomena and/or breakdown of lateral HEMTs. The current proposal also contains the development of novel device architecture (dual channel, substrate removal, e-mode), as well as the exploration of new material systems (Aluminum Nitride (Al-based) devices) which can also largely contribute to overcome drawbacks of the GaN on Si technology. The applicability of the novel GaN-on-Si concepts in form of an industrial inverter will be demonstrated finally, with the development of an innovative low inductance packaging system for power devices, making full benefits of the fast switching capability of GaN-based power devices.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2007.3.5 | Award Amount: 2.49M | Year: 2008

PHOSFOS (Photonic Skins For Optical Sensing) develops and builds on a new paradigm for optical sensors integrated in an unprecedented manner with opto-electronic and electronic circuitry in flexible and stretchable skins for applications in diverse fields including structural health monitoring, automotive industry, aeronautics and aerospace, robotics, healthcare etc. PHOSFOS intends to develop a technology that provides an answer to essential issues that have so far prevented fibre sensors from penetrating the market, which include packaging, fully-fledged system integration, optical coupling and interfacing, dependable strain transfer and reliability. The project positions itself at the pre-competitive intersection of optical fibre sensing and integrated optics. It aims at developing a flexible and stretchable foil in which all necessary optical sensing elements can be integrated; that if relevant to the application can include optical and electrical powering as well as onboard signal processing and wireless communications; that can be wrapped around irregularly shaped objects; that will allow quasi-distributed sensing. To do so the sensing elements in PHOSFOS will rely on special highly birefringent micro-structured optical fibres (MSF) and polymer optical fibres (POF) with fibre Bragg gratings. The silica fibres will be designed to exhibit almost zero temperature sensitivity whereas POF fibres will be used for their very specific property that their length can be stretched up to 300 % before breaking. The optimal Bragg grating writing technology in these fibres, both silica and POF, will be developed. PHOSFOS will focus on embedding these into the sensing skin and on the optical coupling/interfacing to the peripheral opto-electronics and electronics. PHOSFOS will end with 2 proof-of-concept demonstrators, a first targeting structural health monitoring of civil engineering structures, the second aiming at the automotive industry.


Improving maternal and newborn health requires innovative approaches that maximise opportunities for impact throughout the continuum of care. In the past decade, maternal health services have largely focused on the management of intrapartum complications and on rationalising the package of antenatal services to include emergency obstetric care provided by skilled birth attendants. These interventions have sought to target what are widely considered to be the most common and immediate causes of maternal death. Yet this approach fails to address many underlying morbidities that are instrumental in generating high rates of maternal mortality, such as anaemia and inadequate birth spacing. Also missing is a direct focus on the substantial proportion of maternal deaths in the postpartum. Indeed, as a component of maternal health, postpartum care has been neglected, along with the field of newborn health in Africa. The essential package and optimum structure of postpartum services for women and newborns in Africa remains poorly defined, with missed opportunities for improved care. We thus propose developing a package of interventions targeting newborn health and women in the early postpartum period and throughout the first year after childbirth. This package will be delivered through a combined facility- and community-based approach designed to integrate services and strengthen health systems. It will be implemented in four African countries (Burkina Faso, Kenya, Malawi and Mozambique) by a consortium of five African and three European partners. Intervention design will be preceded and informed by a situational analysis of postpartum policies and practices in the four countries and a feasibility assessment. This will ensure that interventions are amenable to scaling up and appropriately tailored to local contexts. Implementation will be followed by health systems research to evaluate effectiveness and impact, and to identify determinants of healthcare improvements.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2014-ETN | Award Amount: 3.84M | Year: 2015

MUltiSectoral Integrative approaches to CArdiac care MUSICA - is proposed by a team of universities, companies and hospitals from 4 EU countries (Italy, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, Belgium). The main scope of MUSICA is to structure a new trans-sectoral and multidisciplinary network capable of developing research and technology with no barriers between academia, industries and clinicians in the cardiac arena, and of shaping young researchers with a novel and truly multidisciplinary mindset, capable of developing clinical- and business-oriented technology including tools for the advancement of base knowledge. MUSICA activity will impact on the field of cardiac surgery in three ways: i) from a scientific standpoint, new knowledge will be gained regarding the response of tissues to their surgical reshaping, to the implantation of devices and to drugs; ii) from a technological standpoint, new technologies will be developed to improve the design and generation of new clinical solutions, the clinical training, and image-based diagnosis and prognosis; iii) from an educational standpoint, a new paradigm of PhD track will be implemented, which will combine academic research in the field of biomedical engineering with industrial research activities and with on-the-field activity within clinical infrastructures. This novel PhD track will be accessed by 15 Early Stage Researchers (ESRs) recruited in the project by universities (7) and companies (8).


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2011.3.3-2 | Award Amount: 3.80M | Year: 2012

BACKGROUND The prevalence of overweight and obesity in Europe is high and contribute to mortality and the burden of many chronic diseases, especially within groups of lower social-economic status. Obesity is largely determined by modifiable lifestyle dependent risk factors such as reduced physical activity, sedentary behaviour and an unhealthy diet. There is growing evidence that influences on individuals and their lifestyle should not only be addressed in single-level interventions that focus on a distinct individual, social or environmental aspect, but rather in community based multi-level intervention approaches (MIAs) that integrate individual, community, organisational, and societal systems. OBJECTIVES SPOTLIGHT aims to increase and combine knowledge on the wide range of determinants of obesity in a systematic way, and to identify MIAs that are strong in terms of Reach, Efficacy, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance (RE-AIM). A further aim is to identify factors for successful implementation of MIAs into health promotion practice. APPROACH By combining published research and collected cross-European data with expert and target-group perspectives, effective, sustainable and implementable MIAs that counteract obesogenic behaviours in adults will be defined. ACHIEVEMENTS We will provide an evidence-based model for effective MIAs in health promotion practice applicable across Europe, and disseminate our findings by policy makers and the scientific community. We will develop a handbook with evidence- and practice-based instructions as well as practical recommendations for policies and interventions, suggestions and reference to best practice that serve as a major dissemination tool. IMPACT Through systematic dissemination of SPOTLIGHT outcomes, the project supports the development and implementation of effective MIAs by local authorities and public health practitioners in order to prevent obesity, reduce the social gradient, and so prevent the related chronic diseases.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FETPROACT-01-2016 | Award Amount: 10.00M | Year: 2017

The hybrid optomechanical technologies (HOT) consortium will lay the foundation for a new generation of devices, which connect, or indeed contain, several platforms at the nanoscale in a single hybrid system. As hybrid interfaces they will allow to harness the unique advantages of each subsystem within a nano-scale footprint, while as integrated hybrid devices they will enable entirely novel functionalities. A particular focus will be on nano-optomechanical devices that comprise electrical, microwave or optical systems with micro- and nano-mechanical systems. Research in the past decade, in particular by European groups, has shown the significant technological potential that such nano-optomechanical systems can offer, in particular by establishing a new way in which optical, radio-frequency and microwave signals can be interfaced. The present consortium includes leading academic groups and industrial partners to explore the potential of these hybrid-nano-optomechanical systems. It will explore hybrid opto- and electro-mechanical devices operating at the physical limit for conversion, synthesis, processing, sensing and measurement of EM fields, comprising radio, microwave frequencies to the terahertz domain. These spectral domains open realistic applications in the existing application domains of medical (e.g. MRI imaging), security (e.g. Radar and THz monitoring), positioning, timing and navigations (Oscillators) and for future quantum technology. The research aims at specific technological application, with realistic operating conditions and seeks to develop actual system demonstrators. In addition, it will explore how these hybrid transducers can be fabricated within standard CMOS processing, and thereby be made compatible with current manufacturing methods. The HOT devices will thereby impact todays technology and likewise address potential future need for the manipulation of quantum signals.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: NMP-2007-3.4-2 | Award Amount: 5.41M | Year: 2008

Catalysis is a well-established area that is well known for shortening molecular assembly protocols. The beneficial overall environmental impact emerging from catalytic uses is also well understood. Making use of catalysis, we plan to develop a program focusing on a very important reaction in organic and homogeneous catalysis that has not yet reached its potential; Olefin Metathesis. The 2005 Nobel Prize was awarded to three pioneers in this area for their seminal contributions but the areas potential has not yet been achieved. The program involves the de novo design, testing, application and commercialization of novel olefin metathesis catalysts. The proposal makes use of unique European expertise in metathesis. The assembled team is composed of leaders in olefin metathesis from various areas: catalyst design, application specialists in polymer and small molecule synthesis, heterogeneization of homogeneous catalyst, computational experts and industrial catalyst production and sales to end users in the pharmaceutical and bulk chemical industries. This is a true conception to commercialization effort. Economic and social impacts are foreseen as major.


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: FETHPC-1-2014 | Award Amount: 3.99M | Year: 2015

To handle the stringent performance requirements of future exascale High Performance Computing (HPC) applications, HPC systems need ultra-efficient heterogeneous compute nodes. To reduce power and increase performance, such compute nodes will require reconfiguration as an intrinsic feature, so that specific HPC application features can be optimally accelerated at all times, even if they regularly change over time. In the EXTRA project, we create a new and flexible exploration platform for developing reconfigurable architectures, design tools and HPC applications with run-time reconfiguration built-in from the start. The idea is to enable the efficient co-design and joint optimization of architecture, tools, applications, and reconfiguration technology in order to prepare for the necessary HPC hardware nodes of the future. The project EXTRA covers the complete chain from architecture up to the application: More coarse-grain reconfigurable architectures that allow reconfiguration on higher functionality levels and therefore provide much faster reconfiguration than at the bit level. The development of just-in time synthesis tools that are optimized for fast (but still efficient) re-synthesis of application phases to new, specialized implementations through reconfiguration. The optimization of applications that maximally exploit reconfiguration. Suggestions for improvements to reconfigurable technologies to enable the proposed reconfiguration of the architectures. In conclusion, EXTRA focuses on the fundamental building blocks for run-time reconfigurable exascale HPC systems: new reconfigurable architectures with very low reconfiguration overhead, new tools that truly take reconfiguration as a design concept, and applications that are tuned to maximally exploit run-time reconfiguration techniques. Our goal is to provide the European platform for run-time reconfiguration to maintain Europes competitive edge and leadership in run-time reconfigurable computing.

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