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Wyk M.V.,University of Pretoria | Wingfield B.D.,University of Pretoria | Al-Adawi A.O.,Ghadafan Agriculture Research Station | Rossetto C.J.,Instituto Agronomico IAC | And 3 more authors.
Mycotaxon | Year: 2011

Mangifera indica, a disease known as mango blight, murcha or seca da mangueira in Brazil, is caused by the canker wilt pathogen Ceratocystis fimbriata sensu lato. It is also closely associated with infestation by the non-native wood-boring beetle Hypocryphalus mangiferae (Coleoptera: Scolytinae). The aim of this study was to characterize Ceratocystis isolates obtained from diseased mango trees in Brazil. Identification was based on sequence data from ITS1+5.8S+ITS2 rDNA, part of the Beta-tubulin 1 gene, and part of the Transcription Elongation Factor 1-alpha gene. The Brazilian isolates grouped in two well defined and unique clades within C. fimbriata s.l. These were also distinct from C. manginecans, which causes a similar disease associated with H. mangiferae in Oman and Pakistan. Based on sequence comparisons and morphological characteristics, isolates representing the two phylogenetic clades are described as C. mangicola sp. nov. and C. mangivora sp. nov. © 2011 Publishing Technology. Source


Al Adawi A.O.,University of Pretoria | Al Adawi A.O.,Ghadafan Agriculture Research Station | Barnes I.,University of Pretoria | Khan I.A.,University of Agriculture at Faisalabad | And 3 more authors.
Australasian Plant Pathology | Year: 2014

Ceratocystis manginecans has recently been described from Oman and Pakistan where the fungus causes a serious wilt disease of mango. In both countries, the disease has moved rapidly throughout mango producing areas leading to the mortality of thousands of mango trees. The disease is associated with the infestation of the wood-boring beetle Hypocryphalus mangiferae that consistently carries C. manginecans. The aim of this study was to consider the population structure of C. manginecans isolated from Oman and Pakistan using microsatellite markers and amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). Population genetic analysis of C. manginecans isolates from diseased mango tissue and bark beetles associated with the disease in Oman and Pakistan, showed no genetic diversity. The apparently clonal nature of the population suggests strongly that C. manginecans was introduced into these countries as a single event or from another clonal source. © 2014 Australasian Plant Pathology Society Inc. Source


Al Adawi A.O.,Ghadafan Agriculture Research Station | Al Sadi B.A.,Ghadafan Agriculture Research Station | Al Jabri M.H.,Ghadafan Agriculture Research Station | Barnes I.,University of Pretoria | And 3 more authors.
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2013

Ceratocystis manginecans has been reported to cause a serious wilt disease of mango in Oman and Pakistan. To identify plants resistant to this disease, 30 mango cultivars were artificially inoculated with isolates of C. manginecans in three trials. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences (P < 0.0001) in lesion lengths among mango cultivars. Similarly, there were significant differences in the aggressiveness of the isolates used for inoculations. However, in trials where more than one isolate was used, there was no significant isolate x cultivar interaction suggesting that isolates do not affect the ranking of cultivars as susceptible or resistant. Cultivar 'Pairi' and local mango cultivars had the longest lesions and were ranked as highly susceptible. In contrast, cultivars 'Hindi Besennara', 'Sherokerzam', 'Mulgoa', 'Baneshan', 'Rose' and 'Alumpur Baneshan', had the smallest lesions and are considered as relatively resistant against C. manginecans. The inoculation results are concurrent with the incidence of wilt of these cultivars under field conditions. © ISHS 2013. Source


Al Adawi A.O.,University of Pretoria | Al Adawi A.O.,Ghadafan Agriculture Research Station | Al Jabri R.M.,Ghadafan Agriculture Research Station | Deadman M.L.,Sultan Qaboos University | And 3 more authors.
European Journal of Plant Pathology | Year: 2013

In Oman, the bark beetle Hypocryphalus mangiferae is closely associated with trees affected by mango sudden decline disease caused by Ceratocystis manginecans. Although it has previously been assumed that this beetle plays a role in the dispersal of the pathogen, this has not been established experimentally. The aim of this study was to determine whether H. mangiferae vectors C. manginecans from infected to healthy mango trees. A survey conducted in northern Al Batinah region of Oman revealed that H. mangiferae was closely associated with mango sudden decline disease symptoms and it was found on trees in the early stages of the disease. Healthy, 2-year-old mango seedlings were exposed to H. mangiferae collected from diseased mango trees. Seedlings were infested by the bark beetles and after 6 weeks, typical mango sudden decline disease symptoms were observed. Ceratocystis manginecans was isolated from the wilted mango seedlings while uncolonized control seedlings remained healthy. The results show that H. mangiferae vectors C. manginecans in Oman and is, therefore, an important factor in the epidemiology of this disease. © 2012 KNPV. Source


Al Adawi A.O.,University of Pretoria | Al Adawi A.O.,Ghadafan Agriculture Research Station | Barnes I.,University of Pretoria | Khan I.A.,University of Agriculture at Faisalabad | And 5 more authors.
Australasian Plant Pathology | Year: 2013

A serious wilt disease has recently been found on Prosopis cineraria (Ghaf) in Oman and on Dalbergia sissoo (Shisham) in Pakistan. Disease symptoms on both these native, leguminous hosts include vascular discolouration and partial or complete wilt of affected trees. A species of Ceratocystis was consistently isolated from symptomatic material. Morphological comparisons and analyses of DNA sequence data of the ITS, β-tubulin, and EF 1-α gene regions showed that the Ceratocystis isolates obtained from both tree species represent C. manginecans. This is the same pathogen that is causing the devastating mango sudden decline disease in Oman and Pakistan. This is also the same pathogen that has been reported causing a wilting disease on Acacia mangium in Indonesia. Cross inoculation with C. manginecans isolates from P. cineraria, D. sissoo and mango showed that the fungus can cause disease on all three trees. © 2013 Australasian Plant Pathology Society Inc. Source

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