The Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research Ltd

Tel Aviv, Israel

The Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research Ltd

Tel Aviv, Israel
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PubMed | The Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research Ltd and Barzilai Medical Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of evidence-based complementary & alternative medicine | Year: 2016

This study compared responses to an in-person clown visit and a humorous film following in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer. Intervention was a 10-minute clown visit (n = 101) or 10-minute humorous video clip (n = 99). Demographic and fertility-related data and preintervention anxiety scores were collected. Participants completed an Evaluation of Intervention form postintervention. There were no group differences on demographic or fertility-related data or anxiety scores. Findings indicate while participants viewed the intervention positively, the clown visit offered a higher degree of satisfaction in more patients than did the film. Median evaluation scores were significantly higher for the clown visit, specifically reducing anxiety level and being more distracting. Both groups reported that the exposure made the clinic experience more pleasant and did not bother them, and most would recommend incorporating the intervention in routine treatment. However, free-text comments clearly expressed greater enthusiasm to the in-person clown intervention than to the film.


Blumstein T.,The Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research Ltd | Benyamini Y.,Tel Aviv University | Boyko V.,The Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research Ltd | Lerner-Geva L.,The Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research Ltd. | Lerner-Geva L.,Tel Aviv University
Women and Health | Year: 2016

The current investigation aimed to assess levels of knowledge about risk factors for heart disease among midlife Israeli women, and to evaluate the relationship of knowledge to personal risk factors and vulnerability to heart disease. Face-to-face interviews with women aged 45–64 years were conducted during 2004–2006 within three population groups: long-term Jewish residents (LTR), immigrants from the former Soviet Union, and Arab women. The survey instrument included six knowledge statements relating to: the risk after menopause, family history, elevated cholesterol level, diabetes, obesity, and warning signs of a heart attack. The findings showed wide disparities in knowledge by educational level and between immigrants and LTR, after taking into account personal risk factors and education. Personal risk factors were not significantly related to the knowledge items, except for personal history of cardiovascular disease, which was associated with knowledge about “warning signs of a heart attack” and “family history.” Women who perceived themselves as more vulnerable to heart disease were more likely to identify several risk factors correctly. These findings stress the need to increase knowledge about heart disease, especially among less educated and minority women, and to emphasize the risk of patients’ personal status by health providers. © 2016 Taylor & Francis.


PubMed | Tel Aviv University, The Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research Ltd . and The Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research Ltd.
Type: Evaluation Studies | Journal: Women & health | Year: 2016

The current investigation aimed to assess levels of knowledge about risk factors for heart disease among midlife Israeli women, and to evaluate the relationship of knowledge to personal risk factors and vulnerability to heart disease. Face-to-face interviews with women aged 45-64 years were conducted during 2004-2006 within three population groups: long-term Jewish residents (LTR), immigrants from the former Soviet Union, and Arab women. The survey instrument included six knowledge statements relating to: the risk after menopause, family history, elevated cholesterol level, diabetes, obesity, and warning signs of a heart attack. The findings showed wide disparities in knowledge by educational level and between immigrants and LTR, after taking into account personal risk factors and education. Personal risk factors were not significantly related to the knowledge items, except for personal history of cardiovascular disease, which was associated with knowledge about warning signs of a heart attack and family history. Women who perceived themselves as more vulnerable to heart disease were more likely to identify several risk factors correctly. These findings stress the need to increase knowledge about heart disease, especially among less educated and minority women, and to emphasize the risk of patients personal status by health providers.


PubMed | Tel Aviv University and The Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research Ltd.
Type: | Journal: International journal of health services : planning, administration, evaluation | Year: 2016

The study aimed to examine differences in medication use among midlife women from different cultural origins and to identify socio-demographic, health, and lifestyle characteristics associated with prescribed and non-prescribed medication use. Face-to-face interviews with women aged 45-64 years were conducted during 2004-2006 within three population groups: long-term Jewish residents (LTJR), immigrants from the former Soviet Union after 1989, and Arab women. The survey instrument included current use of medications and way of purchasing (with/without prescription). The level of prescribed and non-prescribed medication use was categorized as taking none, taking 1-2, and taking 3 or more medications. The rates of medication use were 59.5% for prescribed medication and 47% for non-prescribed medications. Differences between the minority groups and LTJR were observed mainly for cardiovascular, vitamins, supplements, and hormonal medications. The analyses showed significantly lower use of prescribed medications among immigrants and of non-prescribed medications among Arab women after taking into account health and socioeconomic indicators. Increased use of prescribed and non-prescribed medications was associated with worse health status and older age. Education was associated with increased use of non-prescribed medications. The disparities in pharmaceutical care may be linked to barriers in access to health care and to cultural preferences among minorities.


PubMed | The Gertner Institute for Epidemiology and Health Policy Research Ltd
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Menopause (New York, N.Y.) | Year: 2012

The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and correlates of depressive symptoms among Israeli midlife women from different cultural origins and to identify sociodemographic, lifestyle, psychosocial, health, and menopause status characteristics that could explain cultural differences in depressive symptoms.Data were collected for the Womens Health in Midlife National Study in Israel, in which women aged 45 to 64 years were randomly selected according to age and ethnic/origin group strata: long-term Jewish residents (n = 540), immigrants from the former Soviet Union (n = 151), and Arab women (n = 123). The survey instrument included a short form of the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale dichotomized according to a <10/10 cutpoint.The crude prevalence of depressive symptoms was 17%, 39%, and 46% for long-term residents, immigrants, and Arabs, respectively. Among women aged 45 to 54 years, 46% were postmenopausal. After adjustment for sociodemographics, health and menopause status, and lifestyle and psychosocial characteristics, immigrants and Arab women were at a significantly higher risk of depressive symptoms as compared with native-born/long-term Jewish residents (odds ratio, 2.97 and 2.79, respectively). Perimenopause status, numbers of medical symptoms, being unmarried, and negative attitude to aging were positively associated with depressive symptoms, whereas social support and perceived control were associated with lower odds of depressive symptoms. These associations differed across cultural groups when analysis was stratified by study group.Our findings demonstrate that the high level of depressive symptoms among Israeli women is related to cultural/minority status. The high risk for depressive symptoms in these minority groups calls for intervention policy to improve their mental health.

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