Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology

Baltimore, MD, United States

Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology

Baltimore, MD, United States
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PHILADELPHIA - New biomarkers identified by a research team in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania could help predict which Parkinson's disease patients will suffer significant cognitive deficits within the first three years of their diagnosis. The results of the analysis from the international Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) are published this week in the open-access journal PLoS ONE. "The results of this study improve our understanding of the changes in brain function that occur with initial cognitive changes in early Parkinson's disease," said Daniel Weintraub, MD, a professor of Psychiatry and lead author. "This could eventually lead to improved clinical care and development of therapies to treat this symptom." Dr. Weintraub led the team that analyzed data and samples from 423 newly diagnosed and untreated Parkinson's disease patients who showed no signs of dementia at the time of their enrollment in PPMI, a landmark observational study launched in 2010 and sponsored by The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research. Three years after enrollment, between 15 and 38 percent of these participants had developed cognitive impairment. The authors assessed brain scans, genetic tests and analyses of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and found cognitive decline correlated with several biomarkers: changes in the dopamine system, global brain atrophy, particular genetic mutations, and markers of Alzheimer's disease. This is the first investigation to find each of these biomarkers, a mix of baseline and longitudinal biomarkers, contributes independently to cognitive decline in early Parkinson's disease. These results may improve the ability of clinicians to predict future cognitive performance in Parkinson's disease patients -- an important part of patient education and clinical management -- and may guide efforts to develop new cognition-enhancing treatments for Parkinson's disease. Other Penn co-investigators include Leslie Shaw, PhD, a professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine; John Trojanowski, MD, PhD, professor of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology; and Lama Chahine, MD, an assistant professor of Neurology. In this study, researchers found an association between cognitive decline and (i) dopamine deficiency and (ii) decreased brain volume or thickness observed in brain scans; (iii) lower levels in CSF of beta-amyloid protein, a marker of Alzheimer's disease, and (iv) single nucleotide polymorphisms in the genes COMT and BDNF, which previously had been associated with cognitive impairment. This cohort of PPMI participants are mostly male, white and highly educated, limiting the application of these findings to other groups. Nonetheless, future validation of these biomarkers could help with clinical trial design for early therapies that may improve cognitive outcomes. Longer follow-up of this cohort will also reveal whether the identified risks are important in later-onset or more advanced cognitive dysfunction in Parkinson's disease. As many as one million Americans and more than five million people worldwide are living with Parkinson's disease. An additional 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with Parkinson's disease each year, and this number does not reflect the thousands of cases that go undetected. The Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative is a public-private partnership funded by The Michael J. Fox Foundation and 20 industry partners. This analysis was also funded in part by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, part of the National Institutes for Health (P50 NS053488). Penn Medicine is one of the world's leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (founded in 1765 as the nation's first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which together form a $6.7 billion enterprise. The Perelman School of Medicine has been ranked among the top five medical schools in the United States for the past 20 years, according to U.S. News & World Report's survey of research-oriented medical schools. The School is consistently among the nation's top recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with $392 million awarded in the 2016 fiscal year. The University of Pennsylvania Health System's patient care facilities include: The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Penn Presbyterian Medical Center -- which are recognized as one of the nation's top "Honor Roll" hospitals by U.S. News & World Report -- Chester County Hospital; Lancaster General Health; Penn Wissahickon Hospice; and Pennsylvania Hospital -- the nation's first hospital, founded in 1751. Additional affiliated inpatient care facilities and services throughout the Philadelphia region include Good Shepherd Penn Partners, a partnership between Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Network and Penn Medicine. Penn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. In fiscal year 2016, Penn Medicine provided $393 million to benefit our community.


Kamdar B.B.,Divisions of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine | Krumm S.K.,Johns Hopkins University | Walston J.D.,Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology | Hager D.N.,Divisions of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine | And 2 more authors.
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society | Year: 2011

Delirium is an important syndrome affecting inpatients in various hospital settings. This article focuses on multidisciplinary and interdepartmental collaboration to advance efforts in delirium clinical care and research. The Johns Hopkins Delirium Consortium, which includes members from the disciplines of nursing, medicine, rehabilitation therapy, psychology, and pharmacy within the departments and divisions of anesthesiology, geriatrics, oncology, orthopedic surgery, psychiatry, critical care medicine, and physical medicine and rehabilitation at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, is one model of such collaboration. This article describes the process involved in developing functional collaboration around delirium and highlights projects, opportunities, and challenges resulting from them. © 2011, Copyright the Authors.


News Article | December 1, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

LAKE ELMO, Minn., Dec. 01, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Joseph G. Ouslander, M.D., has been named Senior Medical Advisor for Pathway Health, a leading post-acute care professional services organization and the exclusive training, education, management and consulting services company for the implementation of INTERACT™ 4.0. He will work closely with Pathway Health’s senior leadership team and clients as they implement quality initiatives to support value-based care. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/5462581c-144d-41f3-ae07-2b8624f418bc “I look forward to supporting Pathway Health’s expert consultants as they assist post-acute care organizations fully implement INTERACT™ 4.0 and improve quality of care,” said Joseph G. Ouslander. Among Dr. Ouslander’s many achievements and contributions in the field of geriatric medicine and care is the creation and dissemination of INTERACT® (Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers), a quality improvement program that assists long-term care facilities and programs in improving care, and reducing unnecessary hospitalizations and their related complications and costs. Dr. Ouslander, an internationally recognized geriatrician, is Professor and Senior Associate Dean and Professor, Geriatric Programs, Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine, Florida Atlantic University (FAU) and Professor (Courtesy) at the Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing at FAU in Boca Raton, Florida. He is a graduate of Johns Hopkins University and the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine. Dr. Ouslander received the prestigious 2012 Nascher/Manning Award from the American Geriatrics Society for his distinguished career and life-long achievements in clinical geriatrics. Dr. Ouslander has published more than 200 original articles and book chapters and is a co-author of two popular textbooks, Essentials of Clinical Geriatrics and Medical Care in the Nursing Home, and an editor of a major textbook in geriatrics, Principles of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology. He has been a visiting professor at numerous universities in the United States and throughout the world. “We are pleased to have created a stronger relationship with Dr. Ouslander. His knowledge and expertise in health care is a great additional to our company and will help forge our path in the new era of health care reform,” said Pathway Health Chief Executive Officer Peter B. Schuna. “As we continue to grow INTERACT™ 4.0 with training, education and INTERACT licensing agreements throughout the post-acute continuum, Dr. Ouslander’s deep knowledge of INTERACT and geriatric medicine will positively impact our clients as they implement measures to reduce hospital readmission rates and improve overall efficiencies.” To learn more about how to effectively implement INTERACT 4.0 or becoming a strategic partner, contact Peter Schuna at 877-777-5463. About Pathway Health Pathway Health is a professional management, consulting, interim management, executive search and education services organization, serving clients across the post-acute care continuum. Pathway Health holds the exclusive, global training license with Florida Atlantic University and provides high-quality training, education and consulting services to the post-acute providers using the Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers (INTERACT™4.0) Quality Improvement Program (QIP). Since 1997, Pathway Health has been keeping a pulse on industry clinical, regulatory, quality and reimbursement trends to keep clients on the path to success. With over 150 experienced professionals, we engage and employ leading clinical and operational experts to assist our clients in achieving the next level of performance. For more information, call 877-777-5463 or visit www.pathwayhealth.com.


News Article | November 15, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

November 15, 2016 - New York, NY - Linda P. Fried, Dean and DeLamar Professor at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, will receive the 2016 Inserm International Prize, a scientific honor presented annually by the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research [Inserm], France's equivalent of the U.S. National Institutes of Health. The Prize will be presented along with five other Inserm awards at a December 8 ceremony held at Collège de France in Paris. "Throughout my career, my interest in the science of healthy aging has been guided by a belief that science and society, working in concert, can optimize our innate capacity for good health," Fried said. "I am grateful to Inserm for this honor and for the light it will shine on this body of scientific breakthroughs. My collaborators and I believe that such science can be the basis for the opportunities of our now-longer lives. Science offers enormous potential to build health for older people around the world and create the foundations to benefit all of us. Worldwide, the number of people aged 65 or older will almost triple by 2050, climbing from about 524 million in 2010 to nearly 1.5 billion. Fried, who has actively collaborated with global leaders to help realize the potential of large older populations, recently led an international summit on aging and health in Shanghai. The most populous nation on earth will be home to as many as 330 million people over age 60 by 2050. In designing the summit, Fried included representation from global academia, government, and private industry, all of which will be called upon to meet the demands of this demographic transformation. . John W. Rowe, Julius B. Richmond Professor of Health Policy and Aging Health Policy and Management at Columbia, suggested Inserm's selection marks a milestone for those within public health who study aging. "The importance of the Inserm Prize relates to its truly international scope and its focus not on a particular discovery but on a scholar's systematic body of work in an important area," he said. "Recognition of Linda Fried's research has special significance as it shows that research on aging, long neglected, has come of age." A highly regarded figure in international public health, Fried has dedicated her career to interventions that equip societies to transition to a world in which greater longevity benefits people of all ages. Her research creating the science of frailty, defining frailty as a clinical syndrome and illuminating its causes, consequences and the potential for preventing it has had great impact. Fried's scientific discoveries have transformed science as well as medical care and public health globally, and catalyzed greater interest in helping older populations thrive. Fried was cited by publisher Thompson Reuters in 2014 as among the top one percent of influential scientific minds of the prior decade. She is also the designer and co-founder of Experience Corps, a program that places senior volunteers in public schools in cities in the United States and around the world. Serving in both tutoring and mentoring roles, Experience Corps' older volunteers help enrich students' academic achievements while bolstering their own health through continued activity and community interaction. In a randomized, controlled trial, Fried successfully demonstrated Experience Corps' success preventing physical disability and cognitive decline among older adults, while raising child literacy. Before coming to Columbia in 2008 Fried founded the Johns Hopkins Center on Aging and Health, directed the Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology, and held joint appointments at Hopkins' schools of medicine, nursing, and public health. Prior winners of the International Prize include Chen Zhu, China's former Minister of Health, Nora Volkow, Director of the National Institutes of Drug Abuse, and Harvey Alter, whose work led to the discovery of hepatitis-C. Last year, the Prize was awarded to Peter Piot, who is currently Director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. The 2008 winner, Tomas Lindahl, former Director of Clare Hall Laboratories at Cancer Research in the United Kingdom, went on to win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2015. Founded in 1922, Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health pursues an agenda of research, education, and service to address the critical and complex public health issues affecting New Yorkers, the nation and the world. The Mailman School is the third largest recipient of NIH grants among schools of public health. Its over 450 multi-disciplinary faculty members work in more than 100 countries around the world, addressing such issues as preventing infectious and chronic diseases, environmental health, maternal and child health, health policy, climate change & health, and public health preparedness. It is a leader in public health education with over 1,300 graduate students from more than 40 nations pursuing a variety of master's and doctoral degree programs. The Mailman School is also home to numerous world-renowned research centers including ICAP (formerly the International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment Programs) and the Center for Infection and Immunity. For more information, please visit http://www. .

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