Porz am Rhein, Germany

German Sport University Cologne

www.dshs-koeln.de
Porz am Rhein, Germany

German Sport University Cologne is a sport university in Cologne, Germany. It is the largest sports university in Europe with more than 5,000 students. The DSHS, in Cologne called SpoHo, is located in the Cologne district Müngersdorf, adjacent to the facilities of the major sports in Cologne, such as the RheinEnergieStadion. Wikipedia.

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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: HEALTH.2013.3.3-1 | Award Amount: 6.59M | Year: 2013

This project focuses on the systematic promotion and facilitation of active mobility (AM) (i.e. walking and cycling including the combination with public transport use) as an innovative approach to integrate physical activity (PA) into individuals everyday lives. In contrast to sports or exercise, AM requires less time and motivation, since AM provides both convenience as a mode of transport, and a healthy lifestyle. As such it has potential to reach parts of the population which have not been receptive to the appeals and benefits of sports and exercise. The objectives of the project are the following: The project will review the literature on AM and identify innovative measures and systematic initiatives to promote AM as well as traffic safety interventions. A longitudinal study will be conducted to evaluate the ongoing AM initiatives combined with traffic safety interventions to better understand correlates of AM and their effects on overall PA, injury risk and exposure to air pollution. An improved user-friendly tool for more comprehensive health impact assessment (HIA) of AM will be developed. The tool will be applied to AM behavior observed in the case study cities and allow the assessment of health and economic impacts of measures. The project will also produce a compendium of good practices of AM promotion aimed at decision makers, implementing authorities, businesses, civil society organizations and end users. Findings and progress reports will be communicated to diverse target audiences, including policy makers, practitioners, researchers and end-users, through a number of media, i.e. reports, journals, brochures, web-content, workshops and presentations.


Memmert D.,German Sport University Cologne
Journal of Sports Sciences | Year: 2011

Recent evidence from neuroscience suggests that creativity is developed early in life and that the greatest improvements in creativity can be expected during this time. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the creative development of children depending on their level of expertise and attention processes. Moreover, the significance of general and specific attention components and special training effects in the development of specific and non-specific creative thinking remain unclear. Thus, skilled (team handball) and non-skilled children (n=120) aged 7, 10, and 13 completed two divergent thinking tasks (specific/non-specific) and two attention tasks (specific/non-specific) in a cross-sectional design. It is evident that general and sport-specific creativity have similar paths of development. Skilled players with high attention scores performed better than skilled players with low attention scores, in accordance with specific creative thinking abilities. In contrast, and in accordance with general creative thinking abilities, non-skilled players with less attentional skills outperformed non-skilled players. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.


Thevis M.,German Sport University Cologne
Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology | Year: 2010

Due to its versatile nature and its corresponding anabolic and anticatabolic properties, insulin has been prohibited in sports since 1999. Numerous studies concerning its impact on glycogen formation, protein biosynthesis, and inhibition of protein breakdown have illustrated its importance for healthy humans and diabetics as well as elite athletes. Various reports described the misuse of insulin to improve performance and muscle strength, and synthetic analogs were the subject of several studies describing the beneficial effects of biotechnologically modified insulins. Rapid- or long-acting insulins were developed to enhance the injection-to-onset profile as well as the controllability of administered insulin, where the slightest alterations in primary amino acid sequences allowed the inhibition of noncovalent aggregation of insulin monomers (rapid-acting analogs) or promoted microprecipitation of insulin variants upon subcutaneous application (long-acting analogs). Information on the metabolic fate and renal elimination of insulins has been rather limited, and detection assays for doping control purposes were primarily established using the intact compounds as target analytes in plasma and urine specimens. However, recent studies revealed the presence of urinary metabolites that have been implemented in confirmation methods of sports drug testing procedures. So far, no screening tool is available providing fast and reliable information on possible insulin misuse; only sophisticated procedures including immunoaffinity purification followed by liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry have enabled the unambiguous detection of synthetic insulins in doping control blood or urine samples. © 2009 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Thevis M.,German Sport University Cologne
Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology | Year: 2010

The central role of testosterone in the development of male characteristics, as well as its beneficial effects on physical performance and muscle growth, has led to the search for synthetic alternatives with improved pharmacological profiles. Hundreds of steroidal analogs have been prepared with a superior oral bioavailability, which should also possess reduced undesirable effects. However, only a few entered the pharmaceutical market due to severe toxicological incidences that were mainly attributed to the lack of tissue selectivity. Prominent representatives of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are for instance methyltestosterone, metandienone and stanozolol, which are discussed as model compounds with regard to general pharmacological aspects of synthetic AAS. Recently, nonsteroidal alternatives to AAS have been developed that selectively activate the androgen receptor in either muscle tissue or bones. These so-called selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are currently undergoing late clinical trials (IIb) and will be prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency from January 2008. Their entirely synthetic structures are barely related to steroids, but particular functional groups allow for the tissue-selective activation or inhibition of androgen receptors and, thus, the stimulation of muscle growth without the risk of severe undesirable effects commonly observed in steroid replacement therapies. Hence, these compounds possess a high potential for misuse in sports and will be the subject of future doping control assays. © 2009 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


This article reviews seemingly conflicting behavioral data about sensorimotor adaptation. Some earlier studies assert that one common mechanism exists for multiple distortions, and others that multiple mechanisms exist for one given distortion. Some but not others report that adaptation is direction-selective. Some submit that adaptation transfers across effectors, and others that a single effector can adapt to multiple distortions. A model is proposed to account for all these findings. It stipulates that adaptive mechanisms respond to multiple distortions, consist of directionally tuned special-purpose modules, can be switched in dependence on contextual cues, and are connected to practiced movement types with a higher weight than to unpracticed ones. © 2013 Bock.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.5.4 | Award Amount: 5.79M | Year: 2011

A demographic transformation is underway with a significant rise in the proportion of people aged 65 and older expected over the coming decades. It is therefore crucial to invest in research aimed at dealing with health challenges of an ageing population.\nFalls represent a major age-related health challenge facing our society, with about one third of older community-living people falling at least once a year. Falls in older people can markedly change ones health trajectory, have debilitating and isolating consequences and can trigger a downward spiral of disability which can lead to institutionalization and premature death. Falls and fractures account for over half of all injury-related health care costs and have a major impact not only on older people, but also their carers, health services and the community. This impact will grow substantially in the near future due to the increased proportion of older people in the population. The prevention of falls and mobility-related disability among older people is an urgent public health challenge in Europe and internationally.\nDespite robust evidence and availability of best-practice clinical guidelines to support interventions for preventing falls in older people, implementation of preventive measures remains low, mainly due to the accompanied high cost in both time and resources of the recommended individualized approach. Novel methods for delivery of quality healthcare are required to increase effectiveness of management while containing costs and using scarce human resources to maximum effect. Technology-based solutions have potential to reduce costs while maintaining individualized high quality healthcare. Fall prediction and prevention is a field of research where technology can be used to facilitate healthy ageing, well-being and independent living, but similar paradigms could potentially be used in other areas of geriatric medicine.\nThe primary aim of the iStoppFalls project and its consortium partners is to develop and evaluate innovative home-based technologies to assist in preventing falls, and thus to improve quality of life of older adults living at home. iStoppFalls will develop unobtrusive technological solutions for continuous monitoring and prevention of fall risk factors that are required to coach people in tailored individualized prevention programs, including exercise and education. The emphasis is not on laboratory research but on active implementation of successful fall prevention strategies in peoples own home.\nA coordinated, active and multidisciplinary team is central to this project to face challenges related to the development of these technology-based solutions. iStoppFalls will involve representatives of world-leading technology and research experts from both university and industry partners in Europe and Australia. The program will strengthen collaboration between research and technology which will contribute to European excellence and competitiveness and will produce new insights.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-EF-CAR | Phase: MSCA-IF-2015-EF | Award Amount: 159.46K | Year: 2016

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is the most common debilitating disease in young adults worldwide. Diagnosed in over 2.3 million people, this neuro-immunological disease is most prevalent in Europe and North America, with over 120,000 diagnosed cases in Germany alone. Great strides have been made in developing medications that slow disease progression, however, the daily symptomatology of MS remains largely untreated. This research proposes investigations of (1) an instrument for objectively measuring MS fatigue and (2) a therapeutic methodology for MS fatigue and disability. Despite great individual variation in MS symptomatology, MS fatigue verges on characteristic, reported by 80% of patients. However, there is currently no standardized means of evaluating or treating MS fatigue. Movement Behavior Analysis and Scales Test (i.e., BAST) tests and pre- and post-test vital signs of 40 persons with MS will be compared to that of 40 neurotypical matched controls. If the BAST is shown to reliably measure MS fatigue, then a testing and rating system for large-scale clinical use will be developed. To test the ability of the BAST to measure changes in MS fatigue and categorize physical disability, a long-term controlled study of the impact of hippotherapy (i.e., therapeutic horseback riding) will be undertaken in 24 individuals with MS. The standardized BAST will afford a robust analysis of movement ability and disability, enabling measurement of symptoms including gait, balance, spasticity, and fatigue. To achieve project objectives while facilitating ample mentorship, this project brings together the movement research facilities and faculty of the German Sport University Cologne (including mentor Dr. Hedda Lausberg, creator of the BAST), researchers and hippotherapists at the Gold-Kraemer Foundation Center for Physical Activity and Sport, and an internship at the University of Cologne Department of Neurology and Center for Palliative Medicine.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: PHC-21-2015 | Award Amount: 5.17M | Year: 2016

Background We propose a holistic view of interrelated frailties: cognitive decline, physical frailty, depression and anxiety, social isolation and poor sleep quality, which are a major burden to older adults and social and health care systems. Early detection and intervention are crucial in sustaining active and healthy ageing (AHA) and slowing or reversing further decline. Aims and Relevance The main aim of my-AHA is to reduce frailty risk by improving physical activity and cognitive function, psychological state, social resources, nutrition, sleep and overall well-being. It will empower older citizens to better manage their own health, resulting in healthcare cost savings. my-AHA will use state-of-the-art analytical concepts to provide new ways of health monitoring and disease prevention through individualized profiling and personalized recommendations, feedback and support. Approach An ICT-based platform will detect defined risks in the frailty domains early and accurately via non-stigmatising embedded sensors and data readily available in the daily living environment of older adults. When risk is detected, my-AHA will provide targeted ICT-based interventions with a scientific evidence base of efficacy, including vetted offerings from established providers of medical and AHA support. These interventions will follow an integrated approach to motivate users to participate in exercise, cognitively stimulating games and social networking to achieve long-term behavioural change, sustained by continued end user engagement with my-AHA. Scale and Sustainability The proposed platform provides numerous incentives to engage diverse stakeholders, constituting a sustainable ecosystem with empowered end users and reliable standardised interfaces for solutions providers, which will be ready for larger scale deployment at project end. The ultimate aim is to deliver significant innovation in the area of AHA by cooperation with European health care organizations, SMEs, NGOs.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: ICT-2011.5.4 | Award Amount: 4.59M | Year: 2012

Healthy independent living is a major challenge for the ageing European population. Promotion of stimulating physical activity and prevention of falls are two key factors. Smart ICT offers unique proactive opportunities to support older people in their own homes. The FARSEEING project aims to provide groundbreaking results for health promotion, fall prevention and technical development. Falls in older persons are common, often leading to institutionalisation and loss of independence. FARSEEING aims to promote better prediction, prevention and support of older persons, by long-term analysis of behavioural and physiological data collected using Smartphones, wearable and environmental sensors: leading to self-adaptive responses. FARSEEING aims to build the worlds largest fall repository. This will include samples of both high functioning community-dwelling elders and high-risk groups of fallers. The architecture of the database will facilitate collection, analysis and processing of data related to falls, daily activity and physiological factors. The inclusion of a longstanding cohort study ensures a representative population sample, which is urgently needed to translate technological advance into real world service provision. Telemedicine service models using open technological platforms, independent of sensor systems, will be developed for detection of falls and exchange of information between the older person, family, caregivers and health-care personnel. Novel exercise regimens will be developed that increase adaptability and stimulate motor learning, and cognitive and emotional well being. The exercise model will focus on capacity to manage a complex challenging environment. User acceptability is central to FARSEEING. Psychological and gerontological expertise is a core activity, including ethical, privacy and e-inclusion dimensions. Data protection will be paramount to build and validate realistic business models and service provision.


Patent
German Sport University Cologne and German Aerospace Center | Date: 2012-09-11

A lower-leg orthosis includes a splint for immobilizing the muscles of the lower leg. The splint comprises a lower-leg cuff and of a foot rest connected to the lower-leg cuff. A foot device is arranged under the foot rest, and the foot rest is supported on the ground via this foot device. The foot device has a ground contact surface and an elastic energy reservoir, which is arranged between the foot rest and the ground contact surface. Torques can be transferred from the foot rest surface to the ground contact surface via the foot device.

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