German Society of Hematology and Oncology

Berlin, Germany

German Society of Hematology and Oncology

Berlin, Germany
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Herold T.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Herold T.,Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research | Herold T.,German Cancer Research Center | Metzeler K.H.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | And 47 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2014

In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), isolated trisomy 13 (AML+13) is a rare chromosomal abnormality whoseprognostic relevance is poorly characterized. Weanalyzed the clinical course of 34 AML+13 patients enrolled in the German AMLCG-1999 and SAL trials and performed exome sequencing, targeted candidate gene sequencing and gene expression profiling. Relapse-free (RFS) and overall survival (OS) of AML+13 patients were inferior compared to other ELN Intermediate-II patients (n=855) (median RFS, 7.8 vs 14.1 months, P = .006; median OS 9.3 vs. 14.8 months, P = .004). Besides the known high frequency of RUNX1 mutations (75%), we identified mutations in spliceosome components in 88%, including SRSF2 codon 95 mutations in 81%. Recurring mutations were detected in ASXL1 (44%) and BCOR (25%).Two patients carried mutations in CEBPZ, suggesting that CEBPZ is a novel recurrently mutated gene in AML. Gene expression analysis revealed a homogeneous expression profile including upregulation of FOXO1 and FLT3 and downregulation of SPRY2. This is the most comprehensive clinical and biological characterization of AML+13 to date, and reveals a striking clustering of lesions in a few genes, defining AML+13 as a genetically homogeneous subgroup with alterations in a few critical cellular pathways. Clinicaltrials.gov identifiers: AMLCG-1999: NCT00266136; AML96: NCT00180115; AML2003: NCT00180102; and AML60+: NCT00893373. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.


Greif P.A.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Greif P.A.,Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research | Dufour A.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Konstandin N.P.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | And 37 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2012

Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) with biallelic CEBPA gene mutations (biCEPBA) represents a distinct disease entity with a favorable clinical outcome. So far, it is not known whether other genetic alterations cooperate with biCEBPA mutations during leukemogenesis. To identify additional mutations, we performed whole exome sequencing of 5 biCEBPA patients and detected somatic GATA2 zinc finger 1 (ZF1) mutations in 2 of 5 cases. Both GATA2 and CEBPA are transcription factors crucial for hematopoietic development. Inherited or acquired mutations in both genes have been associated with leukemogenesis. Further mutational screening detected novelGATA2 ZF1 mutations in 13 of 33 biCEBPA-positive CN-AML patients (13/33, 39.4%). No GATA2 mutations were found in 38 CN-AML patients with a monoallelic CEBPA mutation and in 89 CN-AML patients with wild-type CEBPA status. The presence of additional GATA2 mutations (n=10) did not significantly influence the clinical outcome of 26 biCEBPA-positive patients. In reporter gene assays, all tested GATA2 ZF1 mutants showed reduced capacity to enhance CEBPA-mediated activation of transcription, suggesting that the GATA2 ZF1 mutations may collaborate with biCEPBA mutations to deregulate target genes during malignant transformation. We thus provide evidence for a genetically distinct subgroup of CN-AML. The German AML cooperative group trials 1999 and 2008 are registered with the identifiers NCT00266136 and NCT01382147 at www.clinicaltrials.gov. © 2012 by The American Society of Hematology.


Greif P.A.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Greif P.A.,Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research | Konstandin N.P.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Konstandin N.P.,Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research | And 22 more authors.
Haematologica | Year: 2012

Background The RUNX1 (AML1) gene is a frequent mutational target in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia. Previous studies suggested that RUNX1 mutations may have pathological and prognostic implications. Design and Methods We screened 93 patients with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia for RUNX1mutations by capillary sequencing of genomic DNA. Mutation status was then correlated with clinical data and gene expression profiles. Results We found that 15 out of 93 (16.1%) patients with cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia had RUNX1 mutations. Seventy-three patients were enrolled in the AMLCG-99 trial and carried ten RUNX1 mutations (13.7%). Among these 73 patients RUNX1 mutations were significantly associated with older age, male sex, absence of NPM1 mutations and presence of MLL-partial tandem duplications. Moreover, RUNX1-mutated patients had a lower complete remission rate (30% versus 73% P=0.01), lower relapse-free survival rate (3-year relapse-free survival 0% versus 30.4%; P=0.002) and lower overall survival rate (3-year overall survival 0% versus 34.4%; P<0.001) than patients with wild-type RUNX1. RUNX1 mutations remained associated with shorter overall survival in a multivariate model including age and the European LeukemiaNet acute myeloid leukemia genetic classification as covariates. Patients with RUNX1 mutations showed a unique gene expression pattern with differential expression of 85 genes. The most prominently up-regulated genes in patients with RUNX1-mutated cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia include lymphoid regulators such as HOP homeobox (HOPX), deoxynucleotidyltransferase (DNTT, terminal) and B-cell linker (BLNK), indicating lineage infidelity. Conclusions Our findings firmly establish that RUNX1 mutations are a marker of poor prognosis and provide insights into the pathogenesis of RUNX1 mutation-positive acute myeloid leukemia. © 2012 Ferrata Storti Foundation.


PubMed | University of Auckland, Universitatsklinikum Dresden, University of Marburg, Institute of Biostatistics and Clinical Research and and 4 more.
Type: Clinical Trial | Journal: Blood | Year: 2014

In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), isolated trisomy 13 (AML+13) is a rare chromosomal abnormality whose prognostic relevance is poorly characterized. We analyzed the clinical course of 34 AML+13 patients enrolled in the German AMLCG-1999 and SAL trials and performed exome sequencing, targeted candidate gene sequencing and gene expression profiling. Relapse-free (RFS) and overall survival (OS) of AML+13 patients were inferior compared to other ELN Intermediate-II patients (n=855) (median RFS, 7.8 vs 14.1 months, P = .006; median OS 9.3 vs. 14.8 months, P = .004). Besides the known high frequency of RUNX1 mutations (75%), we identified mutations in spliceosome components in 88%, including SRSF2 codon 95 mutations in 81%. Recurring mutations were detected in ASXL1 (44%) and BCOR (25%). Two patients carried mutations in CEBPZ, suggesting that CEBPZ is a novel recurrently mutated gene in AML. Gene expression analysis revealed a homogeneous expression profile including upregulation of FOXO1 and FLT3 and downregulation of SPRY2. This is the most comprehensive clinical and biological characterization of AML+13 to date, and reveals a striking clustering of lesions in a few genes, defining AML+13 as a genetically homogeneous subgroup with alterations in a few critical cellular pathways. Clinicaltrials.gov identifiers: AMLCG-1999: NCT00266136; AML96: NCT00180115; AML2003: NCT00180102; and AML60+: NCT00893373.


Pastore F.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Pastore F.,German Cancer Research Center | Kling D.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Hoster E.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | And 12 more authors.
Journal of Hematology and Oncology | Year: 2014

Background: The aim of this study was to analyze the long-term survival of AML patients with CEBPA mutations. Patients and methods: We investigated 88 AML patients with a median age of 61 years and (1) cytogenetically normal AML (CN-AML), (2) monoallelic (moCEBPA) or biallelic (biCEBPA) CEBPA mutation, and (3) intensive induction treatment. 60/88 patients have been described previously with a shorter follow-up. Results: Median follow-up time was 9.8 years (95% CI: 9.4-10.1 years) compared to 3.2 and 5.2 years in our former analyses. Patients with biCEBPA mutations survived significantly longer compared to those with moCEBPA (median overall survival (OS) 9.6 years vs. 1.7 years, p = 0.008). Patients ≤ 60 years and biCEBPA mutations showed a favorable prognosis with a 10-year OS rate of 81%. Both, bi- and mo CEBPA-mutated groups had a low early death (d60) rate of 7% and 9%, respectively. Complete remission (CR) rates for bi CEBPA- and moCEBPA-mutated patients were 82% vs. 70% (p = 0.17). biCEBPA-mutated patients showed a longer relapse free survival (RFS) (median RFS 9.4 years vs. 1.5 years, p = 0.021) and a lower cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) compared to moCEBPA-mutated patients. These differences in OS and RFS were confirmed after adjustment for known clinical and molecular prognostic factors. Conclusions: In this long-term observation we confirmed the favorable prognostic outcome of patients with biCEBPA mutations compared to moCEBPA-mutated CN-AML. The high probability of OS (81%) in younger patients is helpful to guide intensity of postremission therapy. © 2014 Pastore et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Hubmann M.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Kohnke T.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Hoster E.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Schneider S.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | And 14 more authors.
Haematologica | Year: 2014

Monitoring minimal residual disease is an important way to identify patients with acute myeloid leukemia at high risk of relapse. In this study we investigated the prognostic potential of minimal residual disease monitoring by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of NPM1 mutations in patients treated in the AMLCG 1999, 2004 and 2008 trials. Minimal residual disease was monitored - in aplasia, after induction therapy, after consolidation therapy, and during follow-up - in 588 samples from 158 patients positive for NPM1 mutations A, B and D (with a sensitivity of 10-6). One hundred and twenty-seven patients (80.4%) achieved complete remission after induction therapy and, of these, 56 patients (44.1%) relapsed. At each checkpoint, minimal residual disease cut-offs were calculated. After induction therapy a cut-off NPM1 mutation ratio of 0.01 was associated with a high hazard ratio of 4.26 and the highest sensitivity of 76% for the prediction of relapse. This was reflected in a cumulative incidence of relapse after 2 years of 77.8% for patients with ratios above the cut-off versus 26.4% for those with ratios below the cut-off. In the favorable subgroup according to European LeukemiaNet, the cut-off after induction therapy also separated the cohort into two prognostic groups with a cumulative incidence of relapse of 76% versus 6% after 2 years. Our data demonstrate that in addition to pre-therapeutic factors, the course of minimal residual disease in an individual is an important prognostic factor and could be included in clinical trials for the guidance of post-remission therapy. The trials from which data were obtained were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (#NCT01382147, #NCT00266136) and at the European Leukemia Trial Registry (#LN_AMLINT2004_230). © 2014 Ferrata Storti Foundation.


PubMed | Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, German Cancer Research Center, German Society of Hematology and Oncology, Krankenhaus Barmherzige Bruder and University of Munster
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2014

NPM1 mutations represent frequent genetic alterations in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) associated with a favorable prognosis. Different types of NPM1 mutations have been described. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the relevance of different NPM1 mutation types with regard to clinical outcome. Our analyses were based on 349 NPM1-mutated AML patients treated in the AMLCG99 trial. Complete remission rates, overall survival and relapse-free survival were not significantly different between patients with NPM1 type A or rare type mutations. The NPM1 mutation type does not seem to play a role in risk stratification of cytogenetically normal AML.


PubMed | University of Auckland, Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research, Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, German Society of Hematology and Oncology and 2 more.
Type: Clinical Trial | Journal: Haematologica | Year: 2014

Monitoring minimal residual disease is an important way to identify patients with acute myeloid leukemia at high risk of relapse. In this study we investigated the prognostic potential of minimal residual disease monitoring by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of NPM1 mutations in patients treated in the AMLCG 1999, 2004 and 2008 trials. Minimal residual disease was monitored - in aplasia, after induction therapy, after consolidation therapy, and during follow-up - in 588 samples from 158 patients positive for NPM1 mutations A, B and D (with a sensitivity of 10(-6)). One hundred and twenty-seven patients (80.4%) achieved complete remission after induction therapy and, of these, 56 patients (44.1%) relapsed. At each checkpoint, minimal residual disease cut-offs were calculated. After induction therapy a cut-off NPM1 mutation ratio of 0.01 was associated with a high hazard ratio of 4.26 and the highest sensitivity of 76% for the prediction of relapse. This was reflected in a cumulative incidence of relapse after 2 years of 77.8% for patients with ratios above the cut-off versus 26.4% for those with ratios below the cut-off. In the favorable subgroup according to European LeukemiaNet, the cut-off after induction therapy also separated the cohort into two prognostic groups with a cumulative incidence of relapse of 76% versus 6% after 2 years. Our data demonstrate that in addition to pre-therapeutic factors, the course of minimal residual disease in an individual is an important prognostic factor and could be included in clinical trials for the guidance of post-remission therapy. The trials from which data were obtained were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (#NCT01382147, #NCT00266136) and at the European Leukemia Trial Registry (#LN_AMLINT2004_230).


Schneider F.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Hoster E.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Unterhalt M.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Schneider S.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | And 19 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2012

The impact of a FLT3-internal tandem duplication (FLT3ITD) on prognosis of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is dependent on the ratio of mutated to wild-type allele. In 648 normal karyotype (NK) AML patients, we found a significant independent effect of the quantitative FLT3ITD mRNA level - measured as (FLT3ITD/wtFLT3)/(FLT3ITD/wtFLT3 + 1) - on outcome. Moreover, this effect was clearly seen in 329 patients with a mutated NPM1 gene (NPM1 +), but not in 319 patients without a NPM1 mutation (wtNPM1). In a multivariate Cox regression model, the quantitative FLT3ITD mRNA level showed an independent prognostic impact on overall survival (OS) and relapse-free survival (RFS) only in the NPM1 + subgroup (OS: hazard ratio, 5.9; [95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.1-11.2]; RFS: hazard ratio, 7.5 [95% CI: 3.4-16.5]). The FLT3ITD mRNA level contributes to relapse risk stratification and might help to guide postremission therapy in NPM1-mutated AML. © 2012 by The American Society of Hematology.

Loading German Society of Hematology and Oncology collaborators
Loading German Society of Hematology and Oncology collaborators