Time filter

Source Type

Hugle B.,German Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology | Speth F.,German Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology | Haas J.-P.,German Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology
Pediatric Rheumatology | Year: 2017

Background: Inflammatory bowel disease can develop in the context of some rheumatic diseases in childhood, including juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is frequently associated with other immune-mediated diseases; however, systemic onset JIA (sJIA) has not previously been connected to IBD. Treatment of sJIA has significantly changed in recent years, possibly causing changes in inflammatory patterns. Therefore, data from the German Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Rheumtology from 2010 until 2015 were analyzed by retrospective chart review. Findings: Eighty-two patients with confirmed diagosis of sJIA were found. Of these, three were identified with a diagnosis of IBD confirmed by colonoscopy (two cases of Crohn's disease, one case of ulcerative colitis) 0.8 - 4.3 years after diagnosis. All three were treated with IL-1 antagonists (anakinra in two cases, canakinumab in one case) and were well controlled for sJIA symptoms at time of diagnosis of IBD Conclusions: IBD seems to be a rare, but possible complication of sJIA. Treatment with IL-1 antagonists might be a relevant factor for a switch in the clinical phenotype of the underlying inflammatory process. © 2017 The Author(s).


PubMed | Charité - Medical University of Berlin, Stanford University, RWTH Aachen, Istanbul University and 29 more.
Type: | Journal: Annals of the rheumatic diseases | Year: 2016

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous group of conditions unified by the presence of chronic childhood arthritis without an identifiable cause. Systemic JIA (sJIA) is a rare form of JIA characterised by systemic inflammation. sJIA is distinguished from other forms of JIA by unique clinical features and treatment responses that are similar to autoinflammatory diseases. However, approximately half of children with sJIA develop destructive, long-standing arthritis that appears similar to other forms of JIA. Using genomic approaches, we sought to gain novel insights into the pathophysiology of sJIA and its relationship with other forms of JIA.We performed a genome-wide association study of 770 children with sJIA collected in nine countries by the International Childhood Arthritis Genetics Consortium. Single nucleotide polymorphisms were tested for association with sJIA. Weighted genetic risk scores were used to compare the genetic architecture of sJIA with other JIA subtypes.The major histocompatibility complex locus and a locus on chromosome 1 each showed association with sJIA exceeding the threshold for genome-wide significance, while 23 other novel loci were suggestive of association with sJIA. Using a combination of genetic and statistical approaches, we found no evidence of shared genetic architecture between sJIA and other common JIA subtypes.The lack of shared genetic risk factors between sJIA and other JIA subtypes supports the hypothesis that sJIA is a unique disease process and argues for a different classification framework. Research to improve sJIA therapy should target its unique genetics and specific pathophysiological pathways.


PubMed | University of Tübingen, German Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology, Olgahospital, Prof Hess Childrens Hospital and German Rheumatism Research Center Berlin and Childrens University Hospital Charite
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Arthritis research & therapy | Year: 2016

Treatment response, remission rates and compliance in patients with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (polyJIA) treated with adalimumab, etanercept, or tocilizumab were analyzed in clinical practice.Data collected in the German BIKER registry were analyzed in patients with polyJIA who started treatment with approved biologics, adalimumab, etanercept or tocilizumab, from 2011 to 2015. Baseline patient characteristics, treatment response, safety and drug survival were compared.Two hundred thirty-six patient started adalimumab, 419 etanercept and 74 tocilizumab, with differences in baseline patient characteristics. Baseline Juvenile Disease Activity Score (JADAS)10 (mean SD) in the adalimumab/etanercept/tocilizumab cohorts was 12.1+/-7.6, 13.8 7.1 and 15.1 7.4, respectively (adalimumab vs etanercept, p=0.01), and Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ)-disability index scores was 0.43 0.58, 0.59 0.6 and 0.63 0.55, respectively (adalimumab vs etanercept, p<0.001). Uveitis history was more frequent in the adalimumab cohort (OR 5.73; p<0.001). Balanced patients samples were obtained by a generalized propensity score to adjust for baseline differences. Pediatric ACR30/50/70/90 criterion improvement after 3 months treatment was achieved by 68%/60%/42%/24% in the etanercept cohort, 67%/59%/43%/27% in the adalimumab cohort and 61%/52%/35%/26% in the tocilizumab cohort. At 24 months, JADAS minimal disease activity was achieved in 52.4%/61.3%/52.4% and JADAS remission in 27.9%/34.8%/27.9% patients in the adalimumab/etanercept/tocilizumab cohorts, respectively. Etanercept was used in 95.5% of patients as a first biologic, adalimumab in 50.8% and tocilizumab in 20.2%. There were no important differences in efficacy between first-line and second-line use of biologics. In total 60.4%/49.4%/31.1% patients discontinued adalimumab/etanercept/tocilizumab, respectively (HR for adalimumab 1.67; p<0.001; HR for tocilizumab 0.35; p=0.001). Drug survival rates did not differ significantly in patients on biologic monotherapy compared with combination therapy with methotrexate. Over 4 years observation under etanercept/adalimumab/tocilizumab, 996/386/103 adverse events, and 148/119/26 serious adverse events, respectively, were reported.In clinical practice, etanercept is most frequently used as first-line biologic. Adalimumab/etanercept/tocilizumab showed comparable efficacy toward polyJIA. Overall, tolerance was acceptable. Interestingly, compliance was highest with tocilizumab and lowest with adalimumab. This study provides the first indication for the comparison of different biologic agents in polyarticular JIA based on observational study data with all their weaknesses and demonstrates the need for well-controlled head-to-head studies for confirmation.


Klotsche J.,a Leibniz Institute | Klotsche J.,Charité - Medical University of Berlin | Niewerth M.,a Leibniz Institute | Haas J.-P.,German Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology | And 6 more authors.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases | Year: 2015

Importance Published evidence on the long-term safety of etanercept (ETA) and adalimumab (ADA) in patients with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA) is still limited. Objectives To investigate the rates of serious adverse events (SAE) and of events of special interest (ESI) under ETA and ADA treatment. Design, setting and participants Patients with pJIA were prospectively observed in the national JIA biological register, Biologika in der Kinderrheumatologie, and its follow-up register, Juvenile arthritis Methotrexate/Biologics long-term Observation. Main outcomes and measures We calculated the relative risks of SAE and ESI for ETA and ADA compared with methotrexate (MTX). Results Among the 1414 patients treated with ETA (n=1414; 4461 exposure years (EY)) and ADA (n=320; 493 EY), significantly more SAE, infections and medically important infections were observed (ETA: 4.5, 5.7, 0.9; ADA: 4.7, 11.4, 0.4 per 100 EY) compared with those treated with MTX alone (n=1455; 2.907 EY; 2.6, 5.5, 0.5 per 100 EY). The risk for malignancies was not significantly increased for ETA and ADA compared with MTX (0.09, 0.27 and 0.07/100 person-years). Patients under ETA monotherapy developed more frequently incident inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and incident uveitis (0.5 and 0.8/100 EY) than patients treated by ETA in combination with MTX (0.1 and 0.2/100 EY) or MTX alone (0.03 and 0.1/100 EY). Conclusions and relevance Our data confirm the acceptable long-term tolerability of ETA and ADA in pJIA. However, whether the onset of IBD and uveitis during ETA monotherapy is a paradoxical effect or an inadequate response to therapy remains unclear and requires further investigation in this growing cohort. © 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd & European League Against Rheumatism.


PubMed | University Utrecht, Children's Healthcare Of Atlanta, Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children, Toxicology and Therapeutic Innovation and 13 more.
Type: | Journal: Annals of the rheumatic diseases | Year: 2016

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous group of diseases, comprising seven categories. Genetic data could potentially be used to help redefine JIA categories and improve the current classification system. The human leucocyte antigen (HLA) region is strongly associated with JIA. Fine-mapping of the region was performed to look for similarities and differences in HLA associations between the JIA categories and define correspondences with adult inflammatory arthritides.Dense genotype data from the HLA region, from the Immunochip array for 5043 JIA cases and 14390 controls, were used to impute single-nucleotide polymorphisms, HLA classical alleles and amino acids. Bivariate analysis was performed to investigate genetic correlation between the JIA categories. Conditional analysis was used to identify additional effects within the region. Comparison of the findings with those in adult inflammatory arthritic diseases was performed.We identified category-specific associations and have demonstrated for the first time that rheumatoid factor (RF)-negative polyarticular JIA and oligoarticular JIA are genetically similar in their HLA associations. We also observe that each JIA category potentially has an adult counterpart. The RF-positive polyarthritis association at HLA-DRB1 amino acid at position 13 mirrors the association in adult seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Interestingly, the combined oligoarthritis and RF-negative polyarthritis dataset shares the same association with adult seronegative RA.The findings suggest the value of using genetic data in helping to classify the categories of this heterogeneous disease. Mapping JIA categories to adult counterparts could enable shared knowledge of disease pathogenesis and aetiology and facilitate transition from paediatric to adult services.


PubMed | a Leibniz Institute, German Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology, Charité - Medical University of Berlin, Asklepios Kinderklinik Sankt Augustin GmbH and Professor Hess Childrens Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Annals of the rheumatic diseases | Year: 2016

Published evidence on the long-term safety of etanercept (ETA) and adalimumab (ADA) in patients with polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA) is still limited.To investigate the rates of serious adverse events (SAE) and of events of special interest (ESI) under ETA and ADA treatment.Patients with pJIA were prospectively observed in the national JIA biological register, Biologika in der Kinderrheumatologie, and its follow-up register, Juvenile arthritis Methotrexate/Biologics long-term Observation.We calculated the relative risks of SAE and ESI for ETA and ADA compared with methotrexate (MTX).Among the 1414 patients treated with ETA (n=1414; 4461 exposure years (EY)) and ADA (n=320; 493 EY), significantly more SAE, infections and medically important infections were observed (ETA: 4.5, 5.7, 0.9; ADA: 4.7, 11.4, 0.4 per 100 EY) compared with those treated with MTX alone (n=1455; 2.907 EY; 2.6, 5.5, 0.5 per 100 EY). The risk for malignancies was not significantly increased for ETA and ADA compared with MTX (0.09, 0.27 and 0.07/100 person-years). Patients under ETA monotherapy developed more frequently incident inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and incident uveitis (0.5 and 0.8/100 EY) than patients treated by ETA in combination with MTX (0.1 and 0.2/100 EY) or MTX alone (0.03 and 0.1/100 EY).Our data confirm the acceptable long-term tolerability of ETA and ADA in pJIA. However, whether the onset of IBD and uveitis during ETA monotherapy is a paradoxical effect or an inadequate response to therapy remains unclear and requires further investigation in this growing cohort.


Hu gle B.,German Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology | Hinze C.,German Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology | Hinze C.,University Childrens Hospital Mu nster | Lainka E.,University of Duisburg - Essen | And 2 more authors.
Pediatric Rheumatology | Year: 2014

Background: Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is commonly considered an autoinflammatory disease. However, sJIA patients may develop aggressive arthritis without systemic inflammation later in the disease, resembling an autoimmune phenotype similar to other subtypes of JIA. The objective of this study was to determine whether antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and rheumatoid factor (RF) will develop in patients with sJIA over the course of the disease.Findings: A single center sample of sJIA patients with follow-up of more than one year was obtained. A retrospective chart survey was used to extract demographic and clinical data as well as presence and titers of ANA and RF at diagnosis and during follow-up. 32 patients were included in the study, with a median age of 4.2 years and median follow-up of 6.0 years. 8/32 patients had ANA titers ≥ 1:80 at diagnosis, with 22/32 patients showing rising ANA titers with titers ≥ 1:80 at last follow-up (p =0.001). 10/32 patients had a positive RF at least once during follow-up, compared to 0/32 at diagnosis (p = 0.001). In 5/10 patients, positive RF was documented at least twice, more than twelve weeks apart. Patients treated with TNF antagonists were not significantly more likely to develop positive ANA titers (p = 0.425) or positive RF (p = 0.703).Conclusions: Patients with sJIA developed increased ANA titers and positive RF over the course of the disease, independent of treatment with TNF antagonists. This might point towards an autoimmune, rather than an autoinflammatory phenotype later in the course of sJIA. © 2014 Hu¨gle et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

Loading German Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology collaborators
Loading German Center for Pediatric and Adolescent Rheumatology collaborators