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Schirmer L.,TU Munich | Worthington V.,National Hospital for Neurology | Solloch U.,German Bone Marrow Center | Loleit V.,TU Munich | And 15 more authors.
Journal of Neurology | Year: 2016

Few regional and seasonal Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) clusters have been reported so far. It is unknown whether patients suffering from sporadic GBS differ from GBS clusters with respect to clinical and paraclinical parameters, HLA association and antibody response to glycosphingolipids and Campylobacter jejuni (Cj). We examined 40 consecutive patients with GBS from the greater Munich area in Germany with 14 of those admitted within a period of 3 months in fall 2010 defining a cluster of GBS. Sequencing-based HLA typing of the HLA genes DRB1, DQB1, and DPB1 was performed, and ELISA for anti-glycosphingolipid antibodies was carried out. Clinical and paraclinical findings (Cj seroreactivity, cerebrospinal fluid parameters, and electrophysiology) were obtained and analyzed. GBS cluster patients were characterized by a more severe clinical phenotype with more patients requiring mechanical ventilation and higher frequencies of autoantibodies against sulfatide, GalC and certain ganglioside epitopes (54 %) as compared to sporadic GBS cases (13 %, p = 0.017). Cj seropositivity tended to be higher within GBS cluster patients (69 %) as compared to sporadic cases (46 %, p = 0.155). We noted higher frequencies of HLA class II allele DQB1*05:01 in the cluster cohort (23 %) as compared to sporadic GBS patients (3 %, p = 0.019). Cluster of severe GBS was defined by higher frequencies of autoantibodies against glycosphingolipids. HLA class II allele DQB1*05:01 might contribute to clinical worsening in the cluster patients. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg


Lange V.,DKMS Life Science Laboratory | Bohme I.,DKMS Life Science Laboratory | Hofmann J.,German Bone Marrow Center | Lang K.,DKMS Life Science Laboratory | And 14 more authors.
BMC Genomics | Year: 2014

Background: A close match of the HLA alleles between donor and recipient is an important prerequisite for successful unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To increase the chances of finding an unrelated donor, registries recruit many hundred thousands of volunteers each year. Many registries with limited resources have had to find a trade-off between cost and resolution and extent of typing for newly recruited donors in the past. Therefore, we have taken advantage of recent improvements in NGS to develop a workflow for low-cost, high-resolution HLA typing.Results: We have established a straightforward three-step workflow for high-throughput HLA typing: Exons 2 and 3 of HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DQB1 and -DPB1 are amplified by PCR on Fluidigm Access Array microfluidic chips. Illumina sequencing adapters and sample specific tags are directly incorporated during PCR. Upon pooling and cleanup, 384 samples are sequenced in a single Illumina MiSeq run. We developed " neXtype" for streamlined data analysis and HLA allele assignment. The workflow was validated with 1140 samples typed at 6 loci. All neXtype results were concordant with the Sanger sequences, demonstrating error-free typing of more than 6000 HLA loci. Current capacity in routine operation is 12,000 samples per week.Conclusions: The workflow presented proved to be a cost-efficient alternative to Sanger sequencing for high-throughput HLA typing. Despite the focus on cost efficiency, resolution exceeds the current standards of Sanger typing for donor registration. © 2014 Lange et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


PubMed | National Hospital for Neurology, TU Munich, DKMS Life Science Laboratory, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry and German Bone Marrow Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of neurology | Year: 2016

Few regional and seasonal Guillain-Barr syndrome (GBS) clusters have been reported so far. It is unknown whether patients suffering from sporadic GBS differ from GBS clusters with respect to clinical and paraclinical parameters, HLA association and antibody response to glycosphingolipids and Campylobacter jejuni (Cj). We examined 40 consecutive patients with GBS from the greater Munich area in Germany with 14 of those admitted within a period of 3months in fall 2010 defining a cluster of GBS. Sequencing-based HLA typing of the HLA genes DRB1, DQB1, and DPB1 was performed, and ELISA for anti-glycosphingolipid antibodies was carried out. Clinical and paraclinical findings (Cj seroreactivity, cerebrospinal fluid parameters, and electrophysiology) were obtained and analyzed. GBS cluster patients were characterized by a more severe clinical phenotype with more patients requiring mechanical ventilation and higher frequencies of autoantibodies against sulfatide, GalC and certain ganglioside epitopes (54%) as compared to sporadic GBS cases (13%, p=0.017). Cj seropositivity tended to be higher within GBS cluster patients (69%) as compared to sporadic cases (46%, p=0.155). We noted higher frequencies of HLA class II allele DQB1*05:01 in the cluster cohort (23%) as compared to sporadic GBS patients (3%, p=0.019). Cluster of severe GBS was defined by higher frequencies of autoantibodies against glycosphingolipids. HLA class II allele DQB1*05:01 might contribute to clinical worsening in the cluster patients.

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