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News Article | April 26, 2017
Site: www.PR.com

Mansfield, TX, April 26, 2017 --( Dr. Henderson is certified by the American Board of Family Medicine and is affiliated with CHRISTUS Santa Rosa Hospital – Westover Hills in San Antonio, TX. Dr. Henderson believes that God has always blessed her with a serving spirit which naturally extended into her service in family and geriatric medicine. Dr. Henderson is committed to helping her patients enjoy a healthier lifestyle. She works with each one to discuss ways they can make better choices for their health. Specialty - Family Medicine Education & Residency Mercer University, Medical Center of Central Georgia, Residency in Family Medicine Mercer University, Medical Center of Central Georgia, Fellowship in Geriatric Medicine Mansfield, TX, April 26, 2017 --( PR.com )-- Dr. Rashida Henderson is a caring and diligent family physician based in Mansfield, TX. Dr. Henderson attended Louisiana State University, where she received her medical degree. She completed her residency in family medicine and fellowship in geriatric medicine at Mercer University, Medical Center of Central Georgia. She also holds her master’s degree in cellular and molecular biology from Louisiana Tech University.Dr. Henderson is certified by the American Board of Family Medicine and is affiliated with CHRISTUS Santa Rosa Hospital – Westover Hills in San Antonio, TX. Dr. Henderson believes that God has always blessed her with a serving spirit which naturally extended into her service in family and geriatric medicine.Dr. Henderson is committed to helping her patients enjoy a healthier lifestyle. She works with each one to discuss ways they can make better choices for their health.Specialty - Family MedicineEducation & ResidencyMercer University, Medical Center of Central Georgia, Residency in Family MedicineMercer University, Medical Center of Central Georgia, Fellowship in Geriatric Medicine Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from Mansfield Primary Care Doctors


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Recently published guidelines from the US Preventive Services Task Force highlighted the lack of evidence supporting statin use for primary cardiovascular prevention in older adults, particularly for those older than 75, something the researchers sought to address with the new study. "As the number of older adults in the United States is rapidly increasing, it is more important than ever that we improve our understanding of preventative interventions in aging patients, and the possible side effects and risks that accompany them," says lead author Benjamin Han, MD, MPH, an assistant professor in the Departments of Medicine-Division of Geriatric Medicine and Palliative Care, and Population Health at NYU Langone Medical Center. "Our study argues that the benefits of initiating statins in older patients, particularly those over 75, may not outweigh the risks." Researchers limited their sample to participants 65 years and older with hypertension and without evidence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Half were treated with pravastatin and half received usual care, to measure pravastatin's effect on all-cause mortality, with a secondary interest in cardiovascular outcomes such as coronary heart disease and nonfatal heart attacks. The researchers noted a nonsignificant direction toward increased mortality in adults aged 75 years and older who received pravastatin. David G. Sutin, MD, study co-author and clinical associate professor in the Department of Medicine-Division of Geriatric Medicine and Palliative Care at NYU Langone Medical Center, says the findings could be explained by side effects of statin use. "We know that any negative effect on day-to-day function places older adults at higher risk for functional decline and death," says Sutin. "It's possible that, for these more vulnerable older adults, the muscle pain or fatigue that can come with statins offset the benefit of statins for primary cardiovascular prevention." Han says clinicians need to consider not just cardiovascular results, but also the patient's chronic medical conditions, medications, and everyday function, as they weigh the potential benefits and risk of statin use. "Providers should engage in shared decision-making with their older patients and treatment recommendations should be individualized," he says. The study authors are joining others in the field in a call for more studies that focus on primary cardiovascular prevention in older adults. In addition to Han and Sutin, other researchers involved in this study were Caroline S. Blaum, MD, the Diane and Arthur Belfer Professor of Geriatric Medicine, director of the Division of Geriatrics & Palliative Care, and professor in the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone Medical Center; Jeff Williamson from Wake Forest School of Medicine; and Barry Davis, Linda Piller, Hannah Pervin, and Sara Pressel from the Coordinating Center for Clinical Trials at University of Texas School of Public Health. This study was supported by contracts NO1-HC-35130 and HHSN268201100036C with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. The ALLHAT investigators acknowledge study medications contributed by Pfizer Inc, AstraZeneca, and Bristol-Myers Squibb and financial support provided by Pfizer Inc. Han is supported by New York University Clinical and Translational Science Award grant KL2 TR001446 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences. Sutin and Blaum are partially supported by The Stroke Foundation, Inc, Sarasota, Florida. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/starting-statins-in-older-patients-not-effective-as-preventive-care-300460953.html


In a new study, researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University are demonstrating that gait, or motion testing, while simultaneously performing a cognitively demanding task can be an effective predictor of progression to dementia and eventually help with earlier diagnosis. To date, there is no definitive way for health care professionals to forecast the onset of dementia in a patient with memory complaints. Dr. Manuel Montero-Odasso, a Lawson scientist, geriatrician at St. Joseph's Health Care London, and associate professor in the Division of Geriatric Medicine at Western University's Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, is leading the "Gait and Brain Study." His team is assessing up to 150 seniors with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a slight decline of memory and other mental functions which is considered a pre-dementia syndrome, in order to detect an early predictor of cognitive and mobility decline and progression to dementia. "Finding methods to detect dementia early is vital to our ability to slow or halt the progression of the disease," says Dr. Montero-Odasso. The study, funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, followed participants for six years and included bi-annual visits. Researchers asked participants to walk while simultaneously performing a cognitively demanding task, such as counting backwards or naming animals. Those individuals with MCI that slow down more than 20 per cent while performing a cognitively demanding task are at a higher risk of progressing to dementia. "While walking has long been considered an automatic motor task, emerging evidence suggests cognitive function plays a key role in the control of walking, avoidance of obstacles and maintenance of navigation," says Dr. Montero-Odasso. "We believe that gait, as a complex brain-motor task, provides a golden window of opportunity to see brain function." The "gait cost," or speed at which participants completed a single task (walking) versus a dual-task, was higher in those MCI individuals with worse episodic memory and who struggle with executive functions such as attention keeping and time management. "Our results reveal a 'motor signature' of cognitive impairment that can be used to predict dementia," adds Dr. Montero-Odasso. "It is conceivable that we will be able to diagnose Alzheimer's disease and other dementias before people even have significant memory loss. Our hope is to combine these methods with promising new medications to slow or halt the progression of MCI to dementia." The study, "Association of Dual-Task Gait with Incident Dementia in Mild Cognitive Impairment", was published in the journal, JAMA Neurology.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

In a new study, researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University are demonstrating that gait, or motion testing, while simultaneously performing a cognitively demanding task can be an effective predictor of progression to dementia and eventually help with earlier diagnosis. To date, there is no definitive way for health care professionals to forecast the onset of dementia in a patient with memory complaints. Dr. Manuel Montero-Odasso, a Lawson scientist, geriatrician at St. Joseph's Health Care London, and associate professor in the Division of Geriatric Medicine at Western University's Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, is leading the "Gait and Brain Study." His team is assessing up to 150 seniors with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a slight decline of memory and other mental functions which is considered a pre-dementia syndrome, in order to detect an early predictor of cognitive and mobility decline and progression to dementia. "Finding methods to detect dementia early is vital to our ability to slow or halt the progression of the disease," says Dr. Montero-Odasso. The study, funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, followed participants for six years and included bi-annual visits. Researchers asked participants to walk while simultaneously performing a cognitively demanding task, such as counting backwards or naming animals. Those individuals with MCI that slow down more than 20 per cent while performing a cognitively demanding task are at a higher risk of progressing to dementia. "While walking has long been considered an automatic motor task, emerging evidence suggests cognitive function plays a key role in the control of walking, avoidance of obstacles and maintenance of navigation," says Dr. Montero-Odasso. "We believe that gait, as a complex brain-motor task, provides a golden window of opportunity to see brain function." The "gait cost," or speed at which participants completed a single task (walking) versus a dual-task, was higher in those MCI individuals with worse episodic memory and who struggle with executive functions such as attention keeping and time management. "Our results reveal a 'motor signature' of cognitive impairment that can be used to predict dementia," adds Dr. Montero-Odasso. "It is conceivable that we will be able to diagnose Alzheimer's disease and other dementias before people even have significant memory loss. Our hope is to combine these methods with promising new medications to slow or halt the progression of MCI to dementia."


(PRLEAP.COM) March 1, 2017 - Louisville, KY - Louisville orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine physician Dr. Stacie Grossfeld of Orthopaedic Specialists PLLC collaborated with U of L medical school residents Drs. Steve Brown and Brent Bohlig to help facilitate their poster submissions to the 2017 American Medical Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting. The poster submissions were based on real-life case studies with two of Dr. Grossfeld's patients.This year's Annual Meeting held by the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine is being held in San Diego, CA. The two day session, which runs through the weekend of May 12th, is the 26th annual meeting held by the AMSSM. This year's theme focuses on Medicine in Motion which applies directly to sports medicine – a focal point for both resident doctors and practicing physicians. Dr. Grossfeld , a double board certified orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine physician with a private medical practice in Louisville, Kentucky, enjoyed the opportunity to serve as mentor and advisor to Dr. Bohlig and Dr. Brown during their research and work on the poster submissions accepted at the 2017 AMSSM meetings.Abstracts are carefully selected through a very strict peer review process. The fact that this research was chosen among many qualified submissions underscores the fact that perhaps contrary to popular belief, even in private practice settings there are patients with interesting and unusual pathology that is noteworthy enough to be presented at a national meeting. Describing her involvement, Dr. Grossfeld explains: "I especially enjoyed this unique opportunity to work with medical residents in multiple medical fields."Dr. Brent Bohlig is currently completing his residency through the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation . He is focusing on working in a family-centered family practice serving families and the elderly. Dr. Bohlig's 2017 abstract submission focuses on proximal leg pain with activity in the avid distance runner.In his submission, Dr. Bohlig found that his 63-year-old patient who is an avid long distance runner started to experience pain during training. After cutting back on her training regimen and seeing no resolve in the sharp pain in her left anterior superior iliac spine, the patient sought medical attention. Dr. Bohlig, after many tests and examinations, determined that the patient had a stress fracture in her iliac crest which is incredibly rare in the field of Sports Medicine. Dr. Stacie Grossfeld and colleague, Dr. Jennifer Thomas, assisted Dr. Bohlig on his case, examinations, and diagnoses.Dr. Steve Brown is currently studying in the Department of Family and Geriatric Medicine at University of Louisville School of Medicine. After completing his residency in Family Medicine, Dr. Brown plans to pursue a fellowship in Sports Medicine. Dr. Brown's abstract submission is titled: "Pushing Through The Pain: Hip Pain in an Older Adult." This submission aligns nicely with his current medical school focus on geriatric study. By incorporating the thought of using exercise and activity to combat pain, his submission also compliments the 2017 AMSSM Annual Meeting's focus on Medicine in Motion.The American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM) fosters professional relationships among sports medicine physicians in an effort to further the discipline of sports medicine through education, research, advocacy, and patient care, as per their mission statement.According to the AMSSM Annual Meeting webpage, "The focus of this two-session course is to prepare sports medicine fellowship faculty to successfully implement the AMSSM recommended sports ultrasound curriculum. Each of the body region stations will cover both diagnostic scan checklist and injection setup/target acquisition for the respective body region. Needle tracking skills will be practiced at the phantom stations."Dr. Stacie L. Grossfeld is a graduate of the University Of Louisville School of Medicine. She served her internship and residency at the University of Minnesota, and completed a fellowship in Sports Medicine at the Fowler- Kennedy Sports Medicine Center. Dr. Grossfeld works as an orthopedic surgeon at Orthopaedic Specialists in Louisville, Kentucky. She is also an Assistant Clinical Professor at the University of Louisville.Along with her medical practice, her involvement with the University of Louisville, and her work as a mentor to many aspiring physicians, Dr. Grossfeld also enjoys serving on the Board of Directors for the Louisville Sports Commission and the YMCA at Norton Commons. She frequently serves as an event doctor for area sporting events including the Derby City Cyclocross racing every November, and she's an avid athlete, enjoying regular spin classes, cycling with her family, skiing (both downhill and Nordic) and competing in tennis (at the 4.5 USTA level).Dr. Grossfeld specializes in a variety of common injuries including: shoulder injuries , knee injuries, hip pain, foot and ankle injuries, elbow and wrist injuries, and more. If you or someone you love has an orthopedic or sports-related medical injury, contact Orthopaedic Specialists to schedule an appointment by calling 502-212-2663 . You can also learn more about Dr. Grossfeld online by visiting her practice website: www.louisvillebones.com


News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

INDIANAPOLIS -- The Aging Brain Care Medical Home, a novel brain-focused population health management program implemented in the homes of older adults, lowered depression severity by more than 50 percent over six months according to a new study from the Regenstrief Institute, Indiana University Center for Aging Research, IU Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science, and Eskenazi Health. The ABC Medical Home program utilizes a trained and scalable workforce of care coordinator assistants with at least high school educations as the core of interdisciplinary care team of nurses, social workers, and physicians responsible for meeting the complex biopsychosocial brain-care needs of older adults. "Response to Depression Treatment in the Aging Brain Care Medical Home Model" is published online in Clinical Interventions in Aging, a peer-reviewed open access journal. The implementation study provides strong evidence of the sustained effectiveness of the ABC Medical Home program at inducing depression remission employing a workforce that develops long-term relationships with the patients through home visits and telephone contacts. The more than 50 percent decrease in depression symptoms occurred in individuals with high levels of these symptoms. While women experienced improvement sooner than men, there was no gender difference in symptom diminution at the end of six months. In older adults with low levels of depression, depression scores remained low over time indicating that the care model prevented depression symptoms from recurring. Michael LaMantia, M.D., MPH, first author of the new study, offers the following analogy to explain the different responses of older adults with high levels of depressive symptoms and those with low levels. "If you have people who are driving a car at 60 miles per hour, these drivers have a lot of room to decelerate over time because they are going at a high speed; similarly there is significant room for symptom decease in those with high symptom levels; but for those with low depressive symptom levels, like those drivers traveling 5 or 10 miles per hour, there isn't a whole lot of decline possible. Keeping them from accelerating is the goal." "The heart of the ABC Medical Home model is collaborative care. We are working in conjunction with the primary care physicians to provide these patients the level of care that they need," said Dr. LaMantia, a former Regenstrief Institute and IU Center for Aging Research investigator who recently became Section Head of Geriatric Medicine and associate professor of medicine at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. Depressive symptoms included feeling hopeless, feeling bad about oneself, or having difficulty concentrating. Severity was measured in the 773 study participants utilizing the Patient Health Questionnaire 9. The PHQ-9 was co-developed in 1999 by Regenstrief Institute research scientist and IU School of Medicine professor of medicine Kurt Kroenke, M.D., to screen primary care patients for depression. It is an easy to administer, validated means of quantifying the patient's symptoms that Dr. Kroenke has called "a blood pressure cuff for depression." The ABC Medical Home program is centered at Eskenazi Health, an academic, urban, public hospital, at 10 community health centers located in Indianapolis, and in the homes of patients who receive medical care at these facilities. "Previously, we were able to reduce depression severity using an expensive and unscalable work force of registered nurses, advanced nurse practitioners, or master degree social workers. This study accomplished similar outcomes with a much more scalable and cost effective work force," said Regenstrief Institute and IU Center for Aging Research investigator Malaz Boustani, MD, MPH, chief innovation and implementation officer of the IU Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science, and founding director of the Sandra Eskenazi Center for Brain Care Innovation. "Such a cost-effective work force can facilitate the dissemination and implementation of the ABC Medical Home care by healthcare systems and physician practices nationwide to meet the needs of the nation's growing population of older adults." Co-authors of the new study in addition to Dr. LaMantia and Dr. Boustani are Debra Litzelman, MA, M.D., of the Regenstrief Institute and IU School of Medicine; Sujuan Gao, Ph.D., Mary Guerriero Austrom, Ph.D., and Ann Cottingham, M.A., M.A.R., of the IU School of Medicine; Anthony J. Perkins, M.S., of the IU Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science and the Indiana Clinical and Translation Sciences Institute; Cathy Alder, J.D., MSW, of Eskenazi Health; and Dustin D. French, Ph.D., of Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University and Veterans Affairs Health Services Research and Development Service. This work was supported by grant 1C1CMS331000-01-00 from the Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The contents of the published study are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services or any of its agencies.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

February 2017 – Older adults are more likely to experience pain than the general population but they may be less likely to be treated for it. The most common reason that pain in elders is under treated is that it is under reported. According to Elizabeth Landsverk, MD, founder of ElderConsult Geriatric Medicine, many elders consider pain a natural consequence of aging – something they just have to live with – and don't report it to their doctors. “Untreated chronic pain puts a great deal of stress on the body and on the individual's emotional health as well,” she says. “It can lead to depression, anxiety, reduced mobility and strength, and loss of appetite and sleep.” Chronic pain in elders can be caused by a wide range of factors. It is most frequently associated with musculoskeletal disorders such as arthritis and degenerative spine disorders but may also be linked to conditions such as cancer, shingles, circulatory problems, and fibromyalgia, or may result from damage to nerves or the central nervous system. “The first step for an elder suffering persistent pain is to have a doctor determine the source of the pain,” says Dr. Landsverk. “It is important to see a doctor who is familiar with pain assessment and treatment in elders, since the approach to pain management is different in older people than in the general population.” For less intense pain, Dr. Landsverk first recommends non-pharmacological steps like ice packs, physical therapy, and exercise. When pain relievers are called for, she recommends the progressive guidelines recommended by the American Geriatric Society. “Pain can be effectively managed in elders and pain relievers are safe for these patients,” she says, “but they must be prescribed cautiously, since older people metabolize medication differently, are more prone to side effects, and may suffer complications from interaction with other medications.” For these reasons, doctors often start their older patients on the lowest possible dose of a pain reliever and increase the dosage only as necessary. The American Geriatric Society classifies pain relievers in four groups: non-opioids, including acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); opioid analgesics; adjuvant drugs; and other medications. “There are many treatment options for older adults suffering from chronic pain,” Dr. Lansverk concludes. “And there are lifestyle factors that can also mitigate its effects. The most important is to stay active – mentally and physically – to the maximum extent possible. It may seem contradictory but studies have shown that activity shifts the patient's focus away from the pain and makes it more bearable. Another important factor is communication between patient and family, caregivers and the medical team. Keeping relationships open and talking honestly about pain helps avoid misunderstandings and prevents the patient from feeling isolated and alone in dealing with the challenge of chronic pain.” Elizabeth Landsverk, MD, is founder of ElderConsult Geriatric Medicine, a house-calls practice in the San Francisco Bay Area that addresses the challenging medical and behavioral issues often facing older patients and their families. Dr. Landsverk is board-certified in internal medicine, geriatric medicine and palliative care and is an adjunct clinical professor at Stanford University Medical School. http://www.elderconsult.com


News Article | November 10, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Someone in the United States develops dementia every 66 seconds (1). Alzheimer's disease, which currently afflicts 5.4 million Americans (1), is devastating for those who have the disease and also imposes a crushing emotional and financial burden on their families. With the aging of the population and projections that by 2050 as many as 16 million people will have the disease, Alzheimer's has become the healthcare challenge of our time. “While researchers work to find ways to prevent or slow the progression of the disease, we are also improving our understanding of how to live with Alzheimer's,” says Elizabeth Landsverk, MD, founder of ElderConsult Geriatric Medicine. “By actively managing the disease, we can improve the quality of life for both patients and caregivers. One of the most interesting and innovative programs is one that gives patients and their care partners the opportunity to experience non-riding activities with horses. A recent study, has confirmed that the powerful horse-human connection helps reduce stress, improve confidence, and enhance overall well-being for those affected by early-stage dementia.” According to Dr. Landsverk there have been many attempts to use non-pharmacological approaches to improve well-being in elders and their caregivers. Music has been shown to have a powerful effect. Other interventions have included aroma therapy, tai chi, and socially engaging activities. It has long been known that animals have a great deal to offer and that they have the instinctive ability to help us heal. Horses in particular are herd animals and have relied for centuries on their ability to sense what others around them feel and to utilize the interdependence of the herd to thrive. “Horses' behaviors often reflect the emotions of people they interact with,” says Dr. Landsverk. “Their nonjudgmental, unconditional interactions have been found to be therapeutic for many populations. For people suffering the stress and anxiety of dementia, the connection to horses can lead to deeper contentment and the joy of connection outside the boundaries of “dementia patient” or “caregiver”.” The Connected Horse Project (http://www.connectedhorse.com),the brain child of Nancy Shier Anzelmo, gerontologist, and Paula Hertel, elder care consultant, offers equine-guided workshops that support people affected by early-stage dementia. Trained facilitators lead participants through a variety of activities including observing horses in pastures or stalls, over-the-fence introduction to horses, grooming, leading, and group exercises on how horses teach us to gain awareness, relax and self-regulate our responses. The Equine Guided Support Study was a pilot project undertaken in 2015 as a collaborative effort by the Connected Horse Project, the Stanford Red Barn Leadership Program, and the Stanford School of Medicine. The study recruited and screened patient-caregiver pairs who participated in three-day equine-guided workshops and were tested before and after the workshops for stress, burden, mood/depression, behaviors and social support. The goal was to assess the effectiveness of the human-horse interactions on stress reduction and quality of life indicators. Dr. Landsverk served as medical advisor for the research study. “Having worked with elders, many with dementia, for more than twenty years,” she says, “I was amazed at how powerful the connection with horses proved to be. All the participants showed an improved mood and affect after interacting with the horses and sharing the day outside the confines of their disease role. For both patients and caregivers, the labels, stigma, and distress of their roles were removed and they were able to enjoy a novel, pleasant, experience that touched their deepest emotions.” The results of the study were presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference, the world's largest forum for the dementia research community, in Toronto in July 2016. “With the dramatic growth of the elder population and the associated growth in the number of people with dementia, we must go beyond medicine to find ways to enhance the quality of life for patients and caregivers,” Dr. Landsverk concludes. “Experiencing the nonverbal responses and behaviors of horses, in social groups not confined by the role of the disease helps people achieve clarity, strength, and healing.” 1. Alzheimer's Association – 2016 Facts and Figures, http://www.alz.org/facts/overview.asp Elizabeth Landsverk, MD, is founder of ElderConsult Geriatric Medicine, a house-calls practice in the San Francisco Bay Area that addresses the challenging medical and behavioral issues often facing older patients and their families. Dr. Landsverk is board-certified in internal medicine, geriatric medicine and palliative care and is an adjunct clinical professor at Stanford University Medical School. http://www.elderconsult.com


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Someone in the United States develops dementia every 66 seconds 1. The diagnosis is devastating for those who have the disease and also imposes a crushing burden on their families. The decision on the best way to care for a loved one with dementia is dependent on many factors, particularly the stage of the illness and of course the family's ability to provide the necessary care. “Sometimes becoming a caregiver occurs without a conscious decision,” says Elizabeth Landsverk, MD, founder of ElderConsult Geriatric Medicine. “In the early stages of dementia, living at home and even living independently are not only possible but desirable in maintaining the patient's sense of self and family members – usually a spouse and/or children – are able to provide the necessary care with minimal disruption to their lives. But the cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia is virtually always progressive and family members have to come to terms with how their roles and relationships will change over time.” In the first stages of care giving, the primary requirement is for basic information: What are the current needs for feeding and hygiene? Medication? Legal and financial matters? What is the best way to communicate? To deal with behavioral issues? How will the disease progress? The patient's primary care physician can provide a great deal of information and can steer the family toward community resources for help with things like transportation, home-delivered meals, and local daycare programs. “When routines have been established for everyday care, attention must be focused on how to ensure the best possible quality of life for the patient, the family, and especially for the primary caregiver,” says Dr. Landsverk. “Here are some tips that will help the patient and prevent care giving responsibilities from becoming overwhelming.” “Providing care for someone with dementia takes a tremendous toll on the physical and emotional health of the primary caregiver,” says Dr. Landsverk. “Caregivers must take care of themselves as well as caring for their loved one. And with the dramatic growth of the elder population and the associated growth in the number of people with dementia, we must go beyond medicine to find ways to enhance the quality of life for patients and caregivers.” Elizabeth Landsverk, MD, is founder of ElderConsult Geriatric Medicine, a house-calls practice in the San Francisco Bay Area that addresses the challenging medical and behavioral issues often facing older patients and their families. Dr. Landsverk is board-certified in internal medicine, geriatric medicine and palliative care and is an adjunct clinical professor at Stanford University Medical School. http://www.elderconsult.com


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

In a 2012 survey, over a quarter (28%) of American adults with chronic conditions reported skipping doses or not filling a prescription because they could not afford to pay for it. Among those who were uninsured or under-insured, rates of cost-related problems getting medications were 30-60%*. At the same time, hospitals, pharmacies, manufacturers and nursing homes dispose of unused medications worth billions of dollars every year, much of which is dumped or burned and ends up in the water we drink and the air we breathe. “The costs of prescription medications have reached crisis levels,” says Elizabeth Landsverk, MD, founder of ElderConsult Geriatric Medicine. “Many people cut back on basics like food and utilities to pay for their prescriptions and many suffer serious declines in their health, increased hospitalizations, and even premature death by taking less medication than directed.” Now, innovative programs are saving lives by bridging the gap between unused pharmaceutical supplies and those in need. State legislatures began taking action on pharmaceutical donation and reuse programs in 1997. These programs create repositories that provide for unused prescription drugs to be donated and re-dispensed to patients. As of mid-2016, 38 states have enacted donation and reuse laws although not all these states have functioning programs. California enacted initial legislation in 2005 and significantly expanded its donation and redistribution law in 2012. In California, as in most states, redistribution does not include controlled substances and donations cannot be made by individual consumers, only by institutions such as hospitals and licensed, skilled nursing facilities. In 2015, the Santa Clara County Public Health Department opened the Better Health Pharmacy in downtown San Jose, the first dedicated drug donation pharmacy in Northern California. “The goal of the Better Health Pharmacy is to improve health by increasing medication access for all and serve patients who cannot afford their medications,” says Dr. Landsverk. “It provides medication without charge to the patient. There is no copay for insured patients and no need to have insurance. All that is needed is a valid prescription from a licensed U.S. physician and an ID. No proof of citizenship, residency, or income is required.” The pharmacy receives unused, unopened, and unexpired medications from licensed healthcare facilities. The drugs most commonly distributed are for asthma, high blood pressure, diabetes and depression. Because of the unpredictable nature of donations and demand, inventory is constantly changing and specific medications may not always be available. Commonly stocked drugs are listed on the pharmacy's web site and patients are advised to phone in advance for an inventory check. “Patients who take less medication than directed are not only risking their health and perhaps even their lives,” says Dr. Landsverk, “they also drive up costs by having more visits to the emergency room and stays in the hospital. This service is not only vitally beneficial for patients but it helps control healthcare costs and prevents the environmental pollution caused by disposing of millions of pills.” Elizabeth Landsverk, MD, is founder of ElderConsult Geriatric Medicine, a house-calls practice in the San Francisco Bay Area that addresses the challenging medical and behavioral issues often facing older patients and their families. Dr. Landsverk is board-certified in internal medicine, geriatric medicine and palliative care and is an adjunct clinical professor at Stanford University Medical School. http://www.elderconsult.com

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