GeoSyndicate Power Pvt. Ltd.

Mumbai, India

GeoSyndicate Power Pvt. Ltd.

Mumbai, India
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Houssein B.,British Petroleum | Chandrasekharam D.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay | Chandrasekharam D.,GeoSyndicate Power Pvt. Ltd. | Chandrasekhar V.,GeoSyndicate Power Pvt. Ltd. | Jalludin M.,British Petroleum
International Journal of Sustainable Energy | Year: 2014

The Republic of Djibouti, occupying an area of 23,180 km2, falls within the arid zone of East Africa and is located above the 'Horn of Africa', adjacent to the Red Sea. This country has several thermal springs and fumaroles distributed over three regions - Lake Assal, Lake Hanle and Lake Abhe. The most characteristic feature of Lake Abhe is the presence of several linear chains of travertine chimneys. The thermal waters are typical of the Na-Cl type near neutral waters rich in CO2. These waters show an oxygen shift, indicating reservoir temperatures>200°C. The chemical signature of the thermal springs and the geology of the Lake Abhe region are very similar to the Tendaho geothermal area of Ethiopia. The geology, temperature gradient and its proximity to Damah Ale volcano make the Lake Abhe region a potential site for geothermal power development. © 2013 © 2013 Taylor & Francis.


Chandrasekharam D.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay | Chandrasekharam D.,GeoSyndicate Power Pvt. Ltd. | Chandrasekhar V.,GeoSyndicate Power Pvt. Ltd.
Transactions - Geothermal Resources Council | Year: 2010

The geothermal systems in Mahanadi Basin, like other geothermal provinces in India, are driven by high heat producing granites. The U, Th and K content of these granites are several orders higher than that found in granites from Central India and the Himalayas. Considering the lithological and structural setting of the region and the geochemical data on the thermal waters and gases it is apparent that the Mahanadi Basin is a potential site for developing both wet and EGS geothermal projects in the future.


Varun C.,GeoSyndicate Power Pvt. Ltd. | Chandrasekharam D.,GeoSyndicate Power Pvt. Ltd. | Chandrasekharam D.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay | Singh H.K.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay | Das S.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay
Transactions - Geothermal Resources Council | Year: 2012

The Unkeshwar thermal springs occurring on the eastern fringes of the Deccan basalt province is chemically distinct from those occurring on the western margin of the province. These springs are very similar to the Godavari rift thermal springs. Although the issuing temperature of the thermal springs is about 47 °C, their chemical signature and the geothermal gradient of the area support a reservoir depth at 2.6 km with the temperature of 156 C. These conditions are similar to that reported for the other thermal springs' sites within the Godavari rift valley.


Chandrasekhar V.,GeoSyndicate Power Pvt. Ltd. | Chandrasekharam D.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay
Transactions - Geothermal Resources Council | Year: 2011

The Himalayan Geothermal Belt extends to a length of about 1500 km from the NW Himalayas to the north-eastern part of India and runs parallel to the Main Boundary Thrust. This belt hosts more than 100 thermal springs with issuing temperatures varying from 57 to 98°C The geothermal systems along the Himalayan Geothermal Belt (HGB) is controlled by the younger granite intrusives which span in age from 1 Ma to 21 Ma. These are the leucogranites that are generated within the crust due to shear heating coupled with radiogenic heat from the radioactive decay of U, Th and K. The chemical constituents in the thermal waters support the involvement of the leucogranites in controlling the circulation of the thermal fluids and also hosting the geothermal reservoirs.


Chandrasekharam D.,King Saud University | Chandrasekharam D.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay | Lashin A.,King Saud University | Lashin A.,Benha University | And 3 more authors.
Environmental Earth Sciences | Year: 2015

The current thermal regime around the red Sea was initiated by a mantle plume beneath Ethiopia, Eretria, Yemen and SW of Saudi Arabia at about 31 Ma before the present. The evolution of the geothermal systems around the Red Sea is coeval to the initial onset of volcanism over the separated land masses (Eritrea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Yemen, Saudi Arabia and Egypt at 14 Ma. The entire tectono-magmatic activities around the Red Sea gave rise to several geothermal provinces over the continents surrounding the Red Sea, represented by thermal springs and fumaroles at several locations in Eretria, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Yemen and Saudi Arabia. These countries have the potential to develop these resources, like Ethiopia, to mitigate CO2 emissions in countries like Saudi Arabia and to enhance the GDP (gross domestic product) of the economically backward countries. The geothermal resources have the potential to make these countries energy independent in future. © 2014, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Chandrasekharam D.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay | Varun C.,GeoSyndicate Power Pvt. Ltd. | Garg G.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay | Singh H.K.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay | Trupti G.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay
Transactions - Geothermal Resources Council | Year: 2014

Siwana Ring Complex falling within the Malani Igneous Suit in Rajasthan, India hosts large volumes of high heat generating granites with high concentration of radioactive elements and the heat generated by these plutons vary from 4 to 41 μw/m3. Thermal waters issuing through these granites are chloride rich due to long period of circulation within these granites. Such granites are potential candidates for future EGS projects in India and elsewhere. Copyright © (2014) by the Geothermal Resources Council.


Chandrasekhar V.,GeoSyndicate Power Pvt. Ltd | Chandrasekharam D.,GeoSyndicate Power Pvt. Ltd | Chandrasekharam D.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay | Trupti G.,GeoSyndicate Power Pvt. Ltd | And 2 more authors.
Transactions - Geothermal Resources Council | Year: 2015

Fluoride content in geothermal waters circulating in granites is much higher compared to those flowing through basaltic rocks. Water-granite interaction for prolonged period of time (∼50 years) at elevated temperatures (∼200 °C) results in high content of fluoride in thermal waters. Mica and amphiboles and fluorapatite are the main source for fluoride in geothermal waters. The fluoride content can be used as a path finder to target granites for EGS projects.


Lashin A.,King Saud University | Lashin A.,Benha University | Chandrasekharam D.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay | Chandrasekharam D.,King Saud University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of African Earth Sciences | Year: 2014

The entire western Arabian shield is the domain of both hydrothermal and enhanced geothermal systems associated with volcanic centres (Harrats) and high heat generating granites. The most prominent sites of hydrothermal systems are located around Al-Lith and Jizan. The hydrothermal system in Al Lith is controlled by high heat generating (~11μW/m3) post orogenic granites. The high heat flow value of >80mW/m2 across Al-Lith coast is due to such granite intrusives, presence of dike swarms that intrude into the granites as well as position of Moho at shallow level. Although the thermal waters are chloride rich, Red Sea involvement is not observed. Long residence time and water rock interaction with granites are the main processes responsible for chloride enrichment in the thermal waters. Oxygen isotope shift indicates presence of high temperature geothermal system in the area. The tritium values indicate that the circulating waters are >75years old. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.


Chandrasekharam D.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay | Chandrasekharam D.,King Saud University | Lashin A.,Benha University | Lashin A.,King Saud University | And 4 more authors.
Environmental Earth Sciences | Year: 2016

Future energy security and CO2 emissions investigation models indicate that the best option for Egypt is to adopt a mitigation strategy by using geothermal energy as an energy source mix and implement energy efficiency policy. The hydrothermal potential is estimated to be of the order of 158 × 106 kWh while El Faliq high heat-generating granite has the potential to generate billion kWh of electricity. Through these two geothermal energy sources, the country can mitigate CO2 reduction to the order of 20 million tones and provide sustained freshwater to domestic, agricultural and industrial sectors. Egypt in future may have to address two important issues such as guaranteed future electricity supply and freshwater supply to meet the growing population and agriculture demand. The current situation indicates that the Nile River may not be able to sustain the demand due to uncertainties in the monsoon pattern and reduction in storage capacity. A renewable energy (geothermal) source mix and implementing a sound energy efficient policy in agricultural, transport and domestic sectors will help the country to meet the future food and water demand of the country. © 2016, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Chandrasekharam D.,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay | Chandrasekharam D.,King Saud University | Chandrasekharam D.,GeoSyndicate Power Pvt. Ltd | Lashin A.,Benha University | And 4 more authors.
Water Resources Management | Year: 2016

The future economy of the Middle East countries (GDP growth) depends on the availability of fresh water for domestic and agricultural sectors. Saudi Arabia, for example, consumes 275 L/day per capita of water that is generated from desalination process using 134 x 106 kWh of electricity. With 6 % population growth rate, demand for fresh water from fossil fuel based desalination plants will grow at an alarming rate. It has been reported that Saudi Arabia’s reliance on fossil fuels to generate electricity and generate fresh water through desalination using the same energy source is economically and politically unsustainable. This may lead to destabilisation of the global economy. However, Saudi Arabia has large geothermal resources along the Red Sea coast that can be developed to generate power and support the generation of fresh water through desalination. The cost of fresh water can be further lowered from the current US$ 0.03/m3. Among the gulf countries, Saudi Arabia can become the leader in controlling CO2 emissions and mitigating the impact on climate change and agricultural production. This will enable the country to meet the growing demand of food and energy for the future population for several decades and to reduce food imports. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

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