Augusta, GA, United States
Augusta, GA, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Liu G.,University of Groningen | Zhu H.,Georgia Prevention Institute | Dong Y.,Georgia Prevention Institute | Podolsky R.H.,University of Georgia | And 3 more authors.
European Journal of Epidemiology | Year: 2011

Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies identified several common variants for obesity: rs9939609 in FTO, rs7566605 near INSIG2 and both rs17782313 and rs17700633 near the MC4R gene. This study aimed to assess the influence of these polymorphisms on development of adiposity in European- (EA) and African-American (AA) youth in two ongoing longitudinal studies including 986 and 606 participants with age ranges of 10-25.8 and 4.0-23.9 years, respectively. Individual growth curve modeling was conducted separately in the two studies. We tested the effect of the SNPs on levels and increase with age (i.e., slope) of weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference and skinfolds from childhood to adulthood, and potential moderation by ethnicity or gender. Beta coefficients computed in the two studies were pooled using meta-analysis. Rs9939609 was associated with logtransformed levels of BMI (β = 0.021, P = 0.01), weight (β = 0.019, P = 0.04) and waist circumference (β = 0.012, P = 0.04). Rs17782313 was associated with triceps (β = 0.05, P = 0.02). Significant interactions of rs17700633 with gender were observed on subscapular-, suprailiac- and sum of skinfolds, with significant associations limited to males (P < 0.05). No significant interactions with ethnicity were found. Only one effect on the slope was observed, rs17700633 showed a significant interaction with age on triceps (β = 0.004, P = 0.04). In two longitudinal studies of EA and AA youth, we replicated the effect of FTO and common variants near MC4R on general and central adiposity. These variants did not affect the increase with age of adiposity from childhood to adulthood with one exception. Common variants for obesity identified in GWA studies have detectable but modest effects on growth curves for adiposity in EA and AA youth. © 2011 The Author(s).


NeSmith E.G.,Georgia Regents University | Medeiros R.S.,Georgia Regents Medical Center | Ferdinand C.H.B.,Georgia Regents Medical Center | Hawkins M.L.,Georgia Regents Medical Center | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery | Year: 2013

BACKGROUND: Few interdisciplinary research groups include basic scientists, pharmacists, therapists, nutritionists, laboratory technicians, as well as trauma patients and families, in addition to clinicians. Increasing interprofessional diversity within scientific teams working to improve trauma care is a goal of national organizations and federal funding agencies such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This article describes the design, implementation, and outcomes of a Trauma Interdisciplinary Group for Research (TIGR) at a Level 1 trauma center as it relates to increasing research productivity, with specific examples excerpted from an ongoing NIH-funded study. METHODS: We used a pretest/posttest design with objectives aimed at measuring increases in research productivity following a targeted intervention. A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis was used to develop the intervention, which included research skill-building activities, accomplished by adding multidisciplinary investigators to an existing NIH-funded project. The NIH project aimed to test the hypothesis that accelerated biologic aging from chronic stress increases baseline inflammation and reduces inflammatory response to trauma (projected n = 150). Pre-TIGR/post-TIGR data related to participant screening, recruitment, consent, and research processes were compared. Research productivity was measured through abstracts, publications, and investigator-initiated projects. RESULTS: Research products increased from 12 to 42 (approximately 400%). Research proposals for federal funding increased from 0 to 3, with success rate of 66%. Participant screenings for the NIH-funded study increased from 40 to 313. Consents increased from 14 to 70. Laboratory service fees were reduced from $300 per participant to $5 per participant. CONCLUSION: Adding diversity to our scientific team via TIGR was exponentially successful in (1) improving research productivity, (2) reducing research costs, and (3) increasing research products and mentoring activities that the team before TIGR had not entertained. The team is now well positioned to apply for more federally funded projects, and more trauma clinicians are considering research careers than before. Copyright © 2013 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


PubMed | Georgia Regents University, Georgia Regents Medical Center and Georgia Prevention Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The journal of trauma and acute care surgery | Year: 2013

Few interdisciplinary research groups include basic scientists, pharmacists, therapists, nutritionists, lab technicians, as well as trauma patients and families, in addition to clinicians. Increasing interprofessional diversity within scientific teams working to improve trauma care is a goal of national organizations and federal funding agencies like the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This paper describes the design, implementation, and outcomes of a Trauma Interdisciplinary Group for Research (TIGR) at a Level 1 trauma center as it relates to increasing research productivity, with specific examples excerpted from an on-going NIH-funded study.We utilized a pre-test/post-test design with objectives aimed at measuring increases in research productivity following a targeted intervention. A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) analysis was used to develop the intervention which included research skill-building activities, accomplished by adding multidisciplinary investigators to an existing NIH-funded project. The NIH project aimed to test the hypothesis that accelerated biologic aging from chronic stress increases baseline inflammation and reduces inflammatory response to trauma (projected N=150). Pre/Post-TIGR data related to participant screening, recruitment, consent, and research processes were compared. Research productivity was measured through abstracts, publications, and investigator-initiated projects.Research products increased from N =12 to N=42; (~ 400%). Research proposals for federal funding increased from N=0 to N=3, with success rate of 66%. Participant screenings for the NIH-funded study increased from N=40 to N=313. Consents increased from N=14 to N=70. Lab service fees were reduced from $300/participant to $5/participant.Adding diversity to our scientific team via TIGR was exponentially successful in 1) improving research productivity, 2) reducing research costs, and 3) increasing research products and mentoring activities that the team prior to TIGR had not entertained. The team is now well-positioned to apply for more federally funded projects and more trauma clinicians are considering research careers than before.


Zhou H.,Georgia Prevention Institute | Lei X.,Georgia Prevention Institute | Benson T.,Georgia Prevention Institute | Mintz J.,Georgia Prevention Institute | And 5 more authors.
Journal of Lipid Research | Year: 2015

Mutations in BSCL2/SEIPIN cause Berardinelli-Seip congenital lipodystrophy type 2 (BSCL2), but the mechanisms whereby Bscl2 regulates adipose tissue function are unclear. Here, we generated adipose tissue (mature) Bscl2 knockout (Ad-mKO) mice, in which Bscl2 was specifically ablated in adipocytes of adult animals, to investigate the impact of acquired Bscl2 deletion on adipose tissue function and energy balance. Ad-mKO mice displayed reduced adiposity and were protected against high fat dietinduced obesity, but not insulin resistance or hepatic steatosis. Gene expression profiling and biochemical assays revealed increased lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation in white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue , as well as browning of WAT, owing to induction of cAMP/protein kinase A signaling upon Bscl2 deletion. Interestingly, Bscl2 deletion reduced food intake and downregulated adipose β3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) expression. Impaired ADRB3 signaling partially offsets upregulated browning-induced energy expenditure and thermogenesis in Ad-mKO mice housed at ambient temperature. However, this counterregulatory response was abrogated under thermoneutral conditions, resulting in even greater body mass loss in AdmKO mice. These findings suggest that Bscl2 regulates adipocyte lipolysis and β-adrenergic signaling to produce complex effects on adipose tissues and whole-body energy balance. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.


AUGUSTA, Ga. (Nov. 14, 2016) - The length of your telomeres appears to be a window into your heart health and longevity, and scientists are measuring them to see if vitamin D and omega-3 supplements really improve both. "Many people take these supplements every day to help protect their heart and slow aging without significant clinical evidence that they do either," said Dr. Yanbin Dong, geneticist and cardiologist at the Georgia Prevention Institute at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. Telomeres are found on either end of the chromosomes inside your cells where they essentially function as a buffer against breakage or infection, said Dr. Haidong Zhu, molecular geneticist at the GPI. With age, telomeres shorten, making our cells and us more susceptible to disease. Short telomeres, for example, are associated with a wide variety of conditions including osteoporosis, heart failure, cancer, hypertension and dementia, Zhu said. While the enzyme telomerase, which occurs naturally in the body, can increase telomere thickness, with age, its activity level drops. A $2.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health will help clear up whether taking vitamin D and/or omega-3 supplements can help us maintain more youthful telomeres and better health. The MCG scientists are using sophisticated technology to look specifically at the telomeres of white blood cells called leukocytes, which are consistently associated with longevity and cardiovascular health in epidemiological studies. They are examining these chromosome buffers in participants of the VITamin D and OmegA-3 Trial, or VITAL, which is examining the impact of the supplements in men age 50 and older and women age 55 and older. That NIH-funded study is being run by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School. The Boston researchers are following a total of about 26,000 participants across the country for five years who are taking one or both of the supplements to see if they reduce the risk of cancer, heart disease and stroke in people without a prior history of these conditions compared to those who don't take the supplements. Within that huge group is a cohort of 1,054 participants living in close proximity to the hospital and medical school who are being more closely followed by researchers there and now also by the MCG researchers. Dong, Zhu and their collaborators have access to blood samples on these participants at baseline as well as the second and fourth year of the study to also look at what happens to the length of telomeres as well as levels of inflammatory factors and other indicators of cardiovascular risk in the blood. While more commonly associated with bone health, receptors for vitamin D are found on all kinds of immune cells - and other cell types as well - and the vitamin can turn inflammation levels up or down. In fact, animal studies have shown the proficiency of the vitamin D receptor as a master regulator of the immune system, Dong said. Chronic inflammation that results when it's turned up sets the stage for many types of disease, from cardiovascular problems to cancer. "Aging also is part of the inflammatory process," said Dong. "As you age, you have higher levels of inflammation." Telomeres are known to be noticeably shorter in chronic inflammation, and "inflammation levels tend to go up as telomeres shrink," Dong said. But there is little - and conflicting - evidence out there on what vitamin D and omega-3 supplements actually do to telomeres. Some small studies have suggested they have no positive impact. In 2012, Zhu, Dong and their colleagues published in the International Journal of Obesity results of a small study in overweight African-Americans that showed vitamin D supplements - in this case a large monthly, rather than daily, dose - improved telomerase activity and cellular aging in a few short months in some circulating blood cells. One additional thing they will pursue as part of this larger study is whether the supplements, assuming they work at all, make more of the telomerase enzyme or only make existing telomeres more active, similar to how anti-depressants make better use of existing levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin. They'll also look in the blood for levels of established pro- and anti-inflammatory markers. In fact, right now, although people take both supplements for a variety of reasons, the only known standard is the amount of vitamin D needed to help maintain bone health. Even groups such as the American Heart Association recommend eating fish twice weekly, but there is no strong evidence of its cardiovascular benefit, Dong said. The dietary allowance for vitamin D by the Institute of Medicine, or IOM, is based on bone health: 600 international units daily up to age 70 and 800 IUs for age 71 and older. "That is why it's vital to do a large, longer study to look at the potential cardiovascular benefit of vitamin D and omega 3, because so many people take them without solid evidence on whether or not it's good for your heart," Zhu said. In fact, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and IOM have said that data is insufficient to recommend vitamin D screening in routine care for cardiovascular or cancer health. The IOM Report on Dietary Reference Intakes calls for randomized, clinical trials on the cardiovascular impact of vitamin D. Still, plenty of people already take it, echoed Dong and Zhu, with longevity and improved heart health in mind. Coincidentally, as you age, vitamin D concentrations at least, also tend to decrease as the skin, which gets thinner and more fragile over time, does not absorb vitamin D as efficiently. Dong said 15 minutes of "young" sunlight - between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. - daily should provide enough exposure for your skin to manufacture adequate vitamin D. Sunscreen can interfere with this production and darker skin as well as older skin also make absorption less efficient, he said. In fact, older individuals might need to double their sun exposure. He notes the also very real concern about sun damage, including skin cancers, in the complex strategy to live as long and well as possible. The skin, the body's largest organ, absorbs vitamin D and the liver and kidneys convert it to calcidiol and calcitriol respectively. Calcidiol is the precursor of calcitriol, which is a form of vitamin D the body can use. The fat-soluble vitamin is present is naturally present in very few foods, according to the NIH Office of Dietary Supplements. Milk and milk products are fortified with it; fatty fish such as salmon, tuna and mackerel are good natural sources. These fish and others such as herring and sardines, also tend to be a good source for Omega 3 as do nuts and seeds. Participants in the VITAL trial are taking 2,000 international units of vitamin D and/or one gram of fish oil for omega-3.


Huang H.,Sun Yat Sen University | Chen J.,Sun Yat Sen University | Lin T.,Sun Yat Sen University | Wang T.,Sun Yat Sen University | And 3 more authors.
Medical Hypotheses | Year: 2011

Cardiorenal syndromes were defined and classified recently, but the mechanism of chronic renocardiac syndrome remains disputed. Theories about chronic renocardiac syndrome cannot offer a convincing explanation for it. As a result, the current therapies of chronic renocardiac syndrome do not contribute to a satisfied prognosis. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, the products of arachidonic acid metabolized by cytochrome P450 enzymes, play an important role in the maintenance of renal hemodynamics, and regulation of renal, cardiac, and vascular function with antihypertensive and anti-inflammatory properties. It is well documented that down-regulation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids might be involved in alterations in various pathophysiological states, including hypertension, uremia and hepatorenal syndrome. Likewise, epoxyeicosatrienoic acids were reduced in heart failure and renal dysfunction. This leads to the proposed hypothesis that epoxyeicosatrienoic acids down-regulation may be the novel mechanism of chronic renocardiac syndrome. These findings suggest that manipulation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acid levels could be a novel pharmacological therapy strategy for chronic renocardiac syndrome. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


The best way to help young people with neurodevelopmental disorders like autism and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder get more exercise is to make it fun, according to a small international sampling of adults living with them. "We found that a child having fun was a much greater indicator of how likely he or she was to continue exercising," said Matthew Lustig, senior medical student at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. Lustig is enrolled at the Augusta University/University of Georgia Medical Partnership in Athens, a four-year campus of the medical school. Identifying an activity they are good at, from playing basketball to running to tennis, was another top reason for staying physically active, survey participants said. In fact, lack of skill was a much larger deterrent than bottom lines like financial and transportation limitations, said Lustig, who is first-author on a poster presented today at the American Medical Association Research Symposium in Orlando, Florida. "In targeting interventions that increase exercise, creating more cost-effective options may not be as necessary as creating more fun options," Lustig said. While the internet and other family and friends tended to be the go-to sources for exercise information, the 132 adults surveyed said they would like the young people's physicians to answer their exercise-related questions. The small survey left Lustig with a lot of follow up questions he plans to pursue, including why pediatricians weren't considered their go-to source. Still there was a lot of exercise and confidence in its benefits in the households surveyed. The overwhelming number of survey respondents said regular exercise would prevent or delay complications of neurodevelopmental disorders and provide short- and long-term benefit to physical, emotional and social wellbeing. They reported the young people with a disorder in their household generally exercised five days per week for about 100 minutes daily, with cardiovascular activities like basketball, cycling and running as the primary focus. Individuals responding to the survey generally reported being physically active as well. Participant recruitment was enabled by an internet questionnaire distributed via Facebook to a wide range of groups associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. That approach enabled a national and international participation from adults living with individuals with a broad spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders. The most prevalent disorders included autism, intellectual disability, ADHD, and Tourette syndrome. The young people with them were a median age of 17; 57 percent were male; and the vast majority where white. A research elective with Dr. Martha S. Tingen, Charles W. Linder, MD Endowed Chair in Pediatrics and associate director of the Georgia Prevention Institute at MCG, enabled Lustig to put his data and research findings together for the AMA presentation. Centers like the GPI have long studied the benefits of exercise and have shown a cognitive benefit in overweight children, for example, another angle Lustig may pursue in this population. Dr. Julie Martin, a pediatric infectious diseases specialist who is the site clerkship director for pediatrics at the AU/UGA Medical Partnership campus and helped Lustig put his survey together, noted that most physicians and pediatricians would likely want to directly provide more information about exercise and its benefits. But with limited appointment times -- averaging about 10 minutes for a sick visit and 20 minutes for a checkup -- "It's just challenging to get everything in," Martin said. This can be particularly difficult in populations, such as the one Lustig surveyed, which already have multiple medical needs. Martin noted a recent visit to her practice of a child thought to have Lyme disease -- which has a long list of symptoms including fatigue, sleep issues and depression -- who instead appeared to be experiencing depression, for which Martin always recommends exercise as a first line of therapy.


AUGUSTA, Ga. (Nov. 11, 2016) - The best way to help young people with neurodevelopmental disorders like autism and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder get more exercise is to make it fun, according to a small international sampling of adults living with them. "We found that a child having fun was a much greater indicator of how likely he or she was to continue exercising," said Matthew Lustig, senior medical student at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. Lustig is enrolled at the Augusta University/University of Georgia Medical Partnership in Athens, a four-year campus of the medical school. Identifying an activity they are good at, from playing basketball to running to tennis, was another top reason for staying physically active, survey participants said. In fact, lack of skill was a much larger deterrent than bottom lines like financial and transportation limitations, said Lustig, who is first-author on a poster presented today at the American Medical Association Research Symposium in Orlando, Florida. "In targeting interventions that increase exercise, creating more cost-effective options may not be as necessary as creating more fun options," Lustig said. While the internet and other family and friends tended to be the go-to sources for exercise information, the 132 adults surveyed said they would like the young people's physicians to answer their exercise-related questions. The small survey left Lustig with a lot of follow up questions he plans to pursue, including why pediatricians weren't considered their go-to source. Still there was a lot of exercise and confidence in its benefits in the households surveyed. The overwhelming number of survey respondents said regular exercise would prevent or delay complications of neurodevelopmental disorders and provide short- and long-term benefit to physical, emotional and social wellbeing. They reported the young people with a disorder in their household generally exercised five days per week for about 100 minutes daily, with cardiovascular activities like basketball, cycling and running as the primary focus. Individuals responding to the survey generally reported being physically active as well. Participant recruitment was enabled by an internet questionnaire distributed via Facebook to a wide range of groups associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. That approach enabled a national and international participation from adults living with individuals with a broad spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders. The most prevalent disorders included autism, intellectual disability, ADHD, and Tourette syndrome. The young people with them were a median age of 17; 57 percent were male; and the vast majority where white. A research elective with Dr. Martha S. Tingen, Charles W. Linder, MD Endowed Chair in Pediatrics and associate director of the Georgia Prevention Institute at MCG, enabled Lustig to put his data and research findings together for the AMA presentation. Centers like the GPI have long studied the benefits of exercise and have shown a cognitive benefit in overweight children, for example, another angle Lustig may pursue in this population. Dr. Julie Martin, a pediatric infectious diseases specialist who is the site clerkship director for pediatrics at the AU/UGA Medical Partnership campus and helped Lustig put his survey together, noted that most physicians and pediatricians would likely want to directly provide more information about exercise and its benefits. But with limited appointment times -- averaging about 10 minutes for a sick visit and 20 minutes for a checkup -- "It's just challenging to get everything in," Martin said. This can be particularly difficult in populations, such as the one Lustig surveyed, which already have multiple medical needs. Martin noted a recent visit to her practice of a child thought to have Lyme disease -- which has a long list of symptoms including fatigue, sleep issues and depression -- who instead appeared to be experiencing depression, for which Martin always recommends exercise as a first line of therapy. The seed for a future as a pediatric neurologist and his interest in the topic of exercise options that work best for children with neurodevelopmental disorders, jelled when Lustig overheard two parents discussing which activity was best for their child while he was volunteering at the Summer Olympics on the UGA campus. Lustig had already worked as a personal trainer, had finished his first two years of medical school and was taking a break in medical school to earn his MBA. His follow-up literature search found little information on the topic. Lustig hopes his current and future studies will help better define the best ways to increase exercise in these children.


AUGUSTA, Ga. (Oct. 31, 2016) - Researchers want to know whether a vitamin K supplement is an effective, inexpensive way to help reduce the cardiovascular risk of obese children. They believe the vitamin, found in green leafy vegetables and made by the bacteria in our gut when we eat meat or cheese, may help improve insulin sensitivity and reduce lipid levels in the blood. Impaired insulin sensitivity, high blood levels of lipids and calcium, along with obesity are major risk factors for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, said Dr. Norman Pollock, bone biologist at the Georgia Prevention Institute at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. In what appears to be the first study of its kind in the United States, MCG researchers are enrolling 60, 8-17-year-olds with higher fasting glucose levels, a sign of an already increased diabetes risk, in an eight-week study where half will get supplements of the more potent version of the vitamin, called K2, while the remainder get placebo. "It's an obscure vitamin that most of us probably don't get enough of," Pollock said. "We hope it will be a safe alternative for these children and potentially others to ensure their cardiovascular health." They'll measure the outcome by looking at markers of cardiovascular health typically analyzed in adults, such as blood levels of triglycerides, good and bad cholesterol, as well as insulin production and sensitivity, said Pollock, principal investigator on the project that was recently funded by the American Heart Association. They think the vitamin will improve the numbers and the risk for the young individuals, while diet and exercise efforts may fail or have their own issues. "Restricting caloric intake or increasing activity is hard to do for an adult, and trying to explain the importance to a child is even more difficult," Pollock said. "Restricting a child's diet who is growing is another fuzzy line, and there also are concerns about long-term impact on children, like development of eating disorders." While still in the early stages of exploring the potential of vitamin K supplementation, Pollock has early evidence that vitamin K levels tend to be lower in obese or overweight children and mounting evidence that supplementation may have some of the same benefits of exercise. Exercise is known to increase levels of osteocalcin, which appears essential to the matrix of strong bones, and to reduce insulin sensitivity, a hallmark of diabetes and related cardiovascular risk. Human and animal studies indicate that increasing vitamin K levels do the same. At least in mice, increasing osteocalcin activity increases insulin production by the pancreas and insulin sensitivity. A connection between osteocalcin and insulin production also has been made in humans, and decreased levels have been reported in type 2 diabetes patients. Pollock's work has shown a link between weak bones and insulin sensitivity. Also, lower levels of vitamin K have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in adults. Since you can't currently give osteocalcin directly, he wondered if vitamin K would yield the same cardiovascular benefit. "We need vitamin K to make osteocalcin active," Pollock said. "We think it all ties together." Other vitamin K studies are underway in Canada and Europe. Pollock also is doing two related studies looking at the more general health impact of vitamin K supplementation on children and adults of all weights. "We want to know who benefits most from vitamin K supplementation," Pollock said. The new studies include giving a high and lower dose of vitamin K, and Pollock notes that his preliminary studies have indicated a dose-response effect. Another potential cardiovascular benefit could come from increased activity by the protein matrix GLA, which is found in the blood and, like osteocalcin, is vitamin K dependent. Activating matrix GLA has been shown to reduce calcium buildup inside blood vessels, a major component of classic atherosclerosis, which can begin accumulating at an early age. Matrix GLA also has a role in bone organization. Years ago, an animal model with the protein knocked out was found to have a lethal buildup of plaque in the blood vessels; and low levels have been considered a biomarker of high cardiovascular disease risk. Others already are exploring the potential of vitamin K supplementation in patients whose clogged arteries are impacting the function of their heart or kidneys. Vitamin K works by increasing carboxylation - a chemical reaction where a carbon is added - of both osteocalcin and matrix GLA, which makes them more active. Vitamin K also has been shown to improve cognitive function in animal models of Alzheimer's so Pollock is developing another clinical protocol on thinking and memory. The fat-soluble vitamin is stored in fat and the liver and known for its important role in helping blood clot, particularly for those who must take a blood thinner.


Barnes V.A.,Georgia Prevention Institute | Gregoski M.J.,Georgia Prevention Institute | Tingen M.S.,Georgia Prevention Institute | Treiber F.A.,Georgia Prevention Institute
Journal of Complementary and Integrative Medicine | Year: 2010

This study examined the impact of breathing awareness meditation (BAM) compared to health education (HE) and lifeskills training (LS) upon resting systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) within the context of potential moderating factors of family environment and expectancy of benefit. 186 African American adolescents (mean age: 15.1±0.7 yrs) were randomly assigned by school to three-month BAM, LS, or HE interventions. Laboratory resting blood pressure (BP), Family Relations Index (FRI) and expectancy of benefit evaluations were conducted at pre-and post-intervention. Higher expectancy of benefit from any of the three interventions resulted in greater reductions in SBP. A two-way interaction indicated that BAM group subjects who came from positive family environments exhibited greater decreases in SBP. A two-way interaction indicated that BAM and LS subjects who came from positive family environments exhibited greater DBP decreases. A two-way interaction indicated that BAM subjects who came from positive family environments exhibited a greater HR decrease (all p<.05). Expectancy of intervention benefits beneficially impacted success of behavioral interventions aimed at reducing SBP. Positive family environments in combination with either BAM or LS appear to have a beneficial impact upon hemodynamic function in AA adolescents. Copyright © 2010 The Berkeley Electronic Press. All rights reserved.

Loading Georgia Prevention Institute collaborators
Loading Georgia Prevention Institute collaborators