Ascensión, Bolivia
Ascensión, Bolivia

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Weber S.B.,Georgetown College | Weber N.,Georgetown College | Godley B.J.,University of Exeter | Pelembe T.,Joint Nature Conservation Committee | And 3 more authors.
Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom | Year: 2014

Ascension Island in the South Atlantic Ocean is renowned for its globally-important nesting population of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) that has been the subject of long-term research. By comparison, very little is known about the apparently small population of hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) that have been recorded in its waters, thousands of kilometres from known nesting beaches. Here, we collate 10 years of in-water tagging data, opportunistic public sighting records and underwater observations to provide a baseline for future research, and present preliminary data on habitat use derived from two individuals fitted with GPS transmitters. Although public sightings were inevitably biased towards popular recreation areas, the resulting distribution suggests that hawksbill turtles occur year round in Ascension Island's waters along the entire 65 km of coastline. Hawksbills were observed feeding on benthic algae and encrusting sponges, and were frequently seen scavenging on fish discards around the Island's pier at night aided by anthropogenic lighting. Between 2003 and 2013, 35 turtles were captured, measured, tagged and then released. Curved carapace lengths ranged from 33.5 to 85 cm (mean = 48.8 cm) indicating that most (if not all) individuals encountered around Ascension are post-pelagic juveniles. Four individuals were recaptured at least once giving a mean minimum residence time of 4.2 yr (range: 2.8–7.3 yr) and a mean growth rate of 2.8 cm yr−1. Turtles fitted with Fastloc™ GPS devices remained at Ascension Island for the duration of the study (>90 days) and occupied restricted home ranges with an average area of 2.5 km2 and an average ‘core use area’ (50% utilization distribution) of 0.05 km2. Together, these results suggest that Ascension Island serves as a mid-Atlantic developmental habitat for benthic-feeding, juvenile hawksbill turtles on extended oceanic migrations before recruiting to their adult foraging grounds, likely to be located in Brazil or tropical West Africa. Copyright © Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 2014

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