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Nuneaton, United Kingdom

Feaver S.,George Eliot Hospital
Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine | Year: 2011

Pain is a universal experience. Efficient and safe management of pain reduces psychological, physiological and socioeconomic adverse outcomes. Pain management requires a strong institutional commitment especially in the present situation of increasing day case and short stay surgery. For the effective management of pain it is imperative to have an organizational framework including all members of the healthcare team irrespective of their speciality. Close liaison with chronic and palliative care teams is important to integrate treatment plans and manage pain with continuity. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Melas N.,Aristotle University of Thessaloniki | Saratzis A.,Aristotle University of Thessaloniki | Dixon H.,George Eliot Hospital | Saratzis N.,Aristotle University of Thessaloniki | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Endovascular Therapy | Year: 2011

Isolated common iliac artery aneurysms (CIAAs) are relatively rare; they typically progress asymptomatically and are revealed incidentally, usually after they have acquired significant dimensions. Traditional open reconstruction is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Rupture is a common initial manifestation. Endovascular repair has been proposed as a minimally invasive alternative, associated with lower morbidity and mortality rates, even in patients at high surgical risk; some specialists have recently proposed endoluminal repair as the first-choice procedure in suitable anatomies. However, only a few sporadic attempts have been made to define the "suitable" anatomy for endovascular repair. This article proposes a classification of isolated CIAAs and provides endovascular specialists with a guide to deciding which type of repair is feasible and efficacious according to the anatomical configuration of the aneurysm. © 2011 by the International Society of Endovascular Specialists. Source


A 57-year-old man presenting with profound visual hallucinations was found to have severe hypomagnesaemia and hypocalcaemia with a normal level of parathyroid hormone (PTH). Magnesium is essential to the release of PTH so the suspected pathophysiology was thought to be: low Mg → inappropriately low PTH → low Ca. He commenced supplementation and his symptoms resolved. Causes of hypomagnesaemia are discussed. Source


A 57-year-old man presenting with profound visual hallucinations was found to have severe hypomagnesaemia and hypocalcaemia with a normal level of parathyroid hormone (PTH). Magnesium is essential to the release of PTH so the suspected pathophysiology was thought to be: low Mg → inappropriately low PTH → low Ca. He commenced supplementation and his symptoms resolved. Causes of hypomagnesaemia are discussed. Source


Alsafadi H.,George Eliot Hospital | Goodwin W.,Coventry University | Syed A.,Coventry University
Clinical Medicine, Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of London | Year: 2011

Keeping well during Hajj is a challenge for people with diabetes. However, with proactive planning and education, it may prove to be an excellent opportunity for reviewing management and enhancing diabetes education to reduce diabetes-related short- and long-term problems. People with diabetes should have enough time to consider a management plan. It is important that healthcare professionals are well informed regarding the effects of Hajj on diabetes and are able to offer advice, guidance and change of medications as required during pre-Hajj counselling to enable patients to stay healthy. © Royal College of Physicians, 2011. All rights reserved. Source

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