Cambridge, MA, United States
Cambridge, MA, United States

Genzyme Corporation is an American biotechnology company based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Since its acquisition in 2011 it's been a fully owned subsidiary of Sanofi. In 2010 Genzyme was the world’s third-largest biotechnology company, employing more than 11,000 people around the world. As a subsidiary of Sanofi, Genzyme has a presence in approximately 65 countries, including 17 manufacturing facilities and 9 genetic-testing laboratories, its products are sold in 90 countries. In 2007, Genzyme generated $3.8 billion in revenues with more than 25 products in the market. In 2006 and 2007 Genzyme was named one of Fortune Magazine’s “100 Best Companies to Work for”. The company donated $83 million worth of products worldwide; in 2006, it made $11 million in cash donations. In 2005, Genzyme was awarded the National Medal of Technology, the highest level of honor awarded by the president of the United States to America’s leading innovators. Wikipedia.


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Patent
Genzyme | Date: 2016-03-18

Methods to elevate progenitor and stem cell counts in animal subjects using compounds which bind to the chemokine receptor CXCR4 are disclosed. Preferred embodiments of such compounds are of the formula Z-linker-Z(1) N(R)(CR_(2))_(n)X


The present invention improves significantly the success rate of lithotripsy and reduces the risk of tissue damage, by injecting a temporary plug in front, and optionally behind a concretion (for extracorporeal lithotripsy) or behind a concretion (for intracorporeal lithotripsy). One aspect of the present invention relates to injecting an inverse thermosensitive polymer solution into a lumen, thereby preventing the migration of a concretion, or its fragments, upon extracorporeal or intracorporeal lithotripsy.


Patent
Genzyme | Date: 2016-10-18

Methods of making ligand-decorated polymer conjugates of therapeutic glycoproteins are described. Improved targeting of glycoproteins to specific tissues is achieved by masking the natural carbohydrate and other surface determinants with high molecular weight polymers, such as, e.g., PEG, polysialic acid, etc., which in turn are decorated with target-specific ligands. In some embodiments, acid-labile linkages in such conjugates or rapidly degradable masking groups allow for the intracellular release of the polymer from the glycoprotein, for example, under conditions found in lysosomes.


Patent
Genzyme | Date: 2016-04-12

Described herein are compositions of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH), wherein at least one polyalkylene glycol polymer is attached to a carbohydrate site of the TSH. Also described are compositions of mutated Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) and at least one polyalkylene glycol polymer, wherein the mutated TSH comprises a TSH in which one or more amino acid residues has been substituted with cysteine residue, and the polyalkylene glycol polymer is attached to the mutated TSH at the site of the substituted cysteine residue. Pharmaceutical compositions comprising these TSH compositions and method of treating a thyroid condition in a patient in need thereof, by administering to the patient an effective amount of the pharmaceutical compositions are also described.


Patent
Genzyme and Lahey Clinic Inc. | Date: 2016-03-18

Disclosed are compositions, methods and kits to control bleeding through the use of an internal occluder based on polymeric solutions, including use of reverse thermosensitive polymers in nephron-sparing surgeries, which produces a completely bloodless surgical field, allowing speedy resection. In certain embodiments, after a certain amount of time, the flow gradually resumes, with no apparent adverse consequences to the kidney. In certain embodiments, return of blood flow may be accelerated by cooling the kidney. The compositions, methods and kits for perfusive organ hemostasis can also be used to simplify or to enable other organ surgeries or interventional procedures, including liver surgery, prostate surgery, brain surgery, surgery of the uterus, spleen surgery and any surgery on any highly vascularized organs.


Patent
Genzyme | Date: 2016-05-20

Compositions and methods for treating disorders affecting motor function, such as motor function affected by disease or injury to the brain and/or spinal cord, are disclosed.


Eliglustat (Genz 112638; N-[(1R,2R)-2-(2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-6-yl)-2-hydroxy-1-(1-pyrrolidinylmethyl)ethyl]-octanamide) as an inhibitor of the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) for use in a method of treating Fabrys or Gauchers disease, the method comprising adjusting the individual therapeutical dose to the P450 metabolism of the patient.


This disclosure provides methods and compositions for treating disorders or injuries that affect motor function and control in a subject. In one aspect, the invention a transgene product is delivered to a subjects spinal cord by administering a recombinant viral vector containing the transgene to the spinal cord. The viral vector delivers the transgene which expresses the encoded recombinant viral gene product. The viral gene product comprises HiF1 -alpha. Also provided are compositions for delivery of a transgene product to a subjects spinal cord.


Patent
Genzyme | Date: 2017-01-18

The invention provides compositions and methods for treating breast cancer. Specifically, the invention relates to administering a Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF) antagonist in combination with capecitabine and ixabepilone to treat breast cancer.


Tambuyzer E.,Genzyme
Nature Reviews Drug Discovery | Year: 2010

Sustained advocacy efforts driven by patients' organizations to make rare diseases a health priority have led to regulatory and economic incentives for industry to develop drugs for these diseases, known as orphan drugs. These incentives, enacted in regulations first introduced in the United States in 1983 and later in Japan, Europe and elsewhere, have resulted in substantial improvements in the treatment for patients with a range of rare diseases. However, the advent of orphan drug development has also triggered several questions, from the definition of rarity to the pricing of orphan drugs and their impact on health-care systems. This article provides an industry perspective on some of the common questions and misconceptions related to orphan drug development and its regulation, with the aim of facilitating future progress in the field. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

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