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News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Recent research shows that a type of antibiotic-resistant bacteria hospitals around the globe are struggling to fight is not new. Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear, the Harvard-wide Program on Antibiotic Resistance and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have discovered that enterococci—a leading antibiotic-resistant microbe—actually dates as far back as 450 million years ago, predating the age of the dinosaurs. “By analyzing the genomes and behaviors of today’s enterococci, we were able to rewind the clock back to their earliest existence and piece together a picture of how these organisms were shaped into what they are today,” co-corresponding author Ashlee Earl, Ph.D., group leader for the Bacterial Genomics Group at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, said in a statement. “Understanding how the environment in which microbes’ live leads to new properties could help us to predict how microbes will adapt to the use of antibiotics, antimicrobial hand soaps, disinfectants and other products intended to control their spread,” she added. According to the researchers, bacteria first arose about four billion years ago and after animals emerged in the seas about 542 million years ago, bacteria learned to live in and on the animals.  However, as animals evolved to the land they took the microbes with them. The researchers found that all species of enterococci were naturally resistant to dryness, starvation, disinfectants and several antibiotics, making the bacteria particularly dangerous in a sterile hospital setting. “We now know what genes were gained by enterococci hundreds of millions of years ago, when they became resistant to drying out, and to disinfectants and antibiotics that attack their cell walls,” study leader Michael Gilmore, Ph.D., senior scientist at Massachusetts Eye and Ear and the director of the Harvard Infectious Disease Institute. They also found that because the bacteria are found in the intestines of the majority of land animals, they were also likely in the intestines of dinosaurs and the first millipede-like organism to crawl onto land. After comparing the genomes of these bacteria, the researchers believe this theory to hold true. The researchers also discovered that a new species of enterococci appeared each time a new type of animal emerged, including when a new type of animal arose after they first crawled onto land and when new types of animals arose after a mass extinction—particularly after the End Permian Extinction 251 million years ago. Antibiotic resistant microbes are becoming an increasingly critical global health threat, with researchers searching for ways to combat these superbugs. “These are now targets for our research to design new types of antibiotics and disinfectants that specifically eliminate enterococci, to remove them as threats to hospitalized patients,” Francois Lebreton, Ph.D., first author of the study and project leader for the Gilmore team, said in a statement. The study was published in Cell.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

Recent research shows that a type of antibiotic-resistant bacteria hospitals around the globe are struggling to fight is not new. Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear, the Harvard-wide Program on Antibiotic Resistance and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have discovered that enterococci—a leading antibiotic-resistant microbe—actually dates as far back as 450 million years ago, predating the age of the dinosaurs. “By analyzing the genomes and behaviors of today’s enterococci, we were able to rewind the clock back to their earliest existence and piece together a picture of how these organisms were shaped into what they are today,” co-corresponding author Ashlee Earl, Ph.D., group leader for the Bacterial Genomics Group at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, said in a statement. “Understanding how the environment in which microbes’ live leads to new properties could help us to predict how microbes will adapt to the use of antibiotics, antimicrobial hand soaps, disinfectants and other products intended to control their spread,” she added. According to the researchers, bacteria first arose about four billion years ago and after animals emerged in the seas about 542 million years ago, bacteria learned to live in and on the animals.  However, as animals evolved to the land they took the microbes with them. The researchers found that all species of enterococci were naturally resistant to dryness, starvation, disinfectants and several antibiotics, making the bacteria particularly dangerous in a sterile hospital setting. “We now know what genes were gained by enterococci hundreds of millions of years ago, when they became resistant to drying out, and to disinfectants and antibiotics that attack their cell walls,” study leader Michael Gilmore, Ph.D., senior scientist at Massachusetts Eye and Ear and the director of the Harvard Infectious Disease Institute. They also found that because the bacteria are found in the intestines of the majority of land animals, they were also likely in the intestines of dinosaurs and the first millipede-like organism to crawl onto land. After comparing the genomes of these bacteria, the researchers believe this theory to hold true. The researchers also discovered that a new species of enterococci appeared each time a new type of animal emerged, including when a new type of animal arose after they first crawled onto land and when new types of animals arose after a mass extinction—particularly after the End Permian Extinction 251 million years ago. Antibiotic resistant microbes are becoming an increasingly critical global health threat, with researchers searching for ways to combat these superbugs. “These are now targets for our research to design new types of antibiotics and disinfectants that specifically eliminate enterococci, to remove them as threats to hospitalized patients,” Francois Lebreton, Ph.D., first author of the study and project leader for the Gilmore team, said in a statement. The study was published in Cell.


Early life as it is believed to have looked 335 million years ago, well before the age of the dinosaurs. Ancestors of hospital pathogens are now believed to have lived in the guts of these ancient land animals. Credit: Mark Witton Leading hospital "superbugs," known as the enterococci, arose from an ancestor that dates back 450 million years—about the time when animals were first crawling onto land (and well before the age of dinosaurs), according to a new study led by researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear, the Harvard-wide Program on Antibiotic Resistance and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. Published online today in Cell, the study authors shed light on the evolutionary history of these pathogens, which evolved nearly indestructible properties and have become leading causes of modern antibiotic-resistant infections in hospitals. Antibiotic resistance is now a leading public health concern worldwide. Some microbes, often referred to as "superbugs," are resistant to virtually all antibiotics. This is of special concern in hospitals, where about 5 percent of hospitalized patients will fight infections that arise during their stay. As researchers around the world are urgently seeking solutions for this problem, insight into the origin and evolution of antibiotic resistance will help inform their search. "By analyzing the genomes and behaviors of today's enterococci, we were able to rewind the clock back to their earliest existence and piece together a picture of how these organisms were shaped into what they are today" said co-corresponding author Ashlee M. Earl, Ph.D., group leader for the Bacterial Genomics Group at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. "Understanding how the environment in which microbes live leads to new properties could help us to predict how microbes will adapt to the use of antibiotics, antimicrobial hand soaps, disinfectants and other products intended to control their spread." The picture the researchers pieced together begins with the dawn of life. Bacteria arose nearly 4 billion years ago, and the planet has teemed with them ever since, including the sea. Animals first arose in the sea during the time known as the Cambrian Explosion, 542 million years ago. As animals emerged in a sea of bacteria, bacteria learned to live in and on them. Some bacteria protect and serve the animals, as the healthy microbes in our intestines do today; others live in the environment, and still others cause disease. As animals crawled onto land about 100 million years later, they took their microbes with them. The authors of the Cell study found that all species of enterococci, including those that have never been found in hospitals, were naturally resistant to dryness, starvation, disinfectants and many antibiotics. Because enterococci normally live in the intestines of most (if not all) land animals, it seemed likely that they were also in the intestines of land animals that are now extinct, including dinosaurs and the first millipede-like organisms to crawl onto land. Comparison of the genomes of these bacteria provided evidence that this was indeed the case. In fact, the research team found that new species of enterococci appeared whenever new types of animals appeared. This includes when new types of animals arose right after they first crawled onto land, and when new types of animals arose right after mass extinctions, especially the greatest mass extinction, the End Permian Extinction (251 million years ago). From sea animals, like fish, intestinal microbes are excreted into the ocean, which usually contains about 5,000 mostly harmless bacteria per drop of water. They sink to the seafloor into microbe-rich sediments, and are consumed by worms, shellfish and other sea scavengers. Those are then eaten by fish, and the microbes continue to circulate throughout the food chain. However, on land, intestinal microbes are excreted as feces, where they often dry out and most die over time. Not the enterococci, however. These microbes are unusually hardy and can withstand drying out and starvation, which serves them well on land and in hospitals where disinfectants make it difficult for a microbe. "We now know what genes were gained by enterococci hundreds of millions of years ago, when they became resistant to drying out, and to disinfectants and antibiotics that attack their cell walls," said study leader Michael S. Gilmore, Ph.D., senior scientist at Mass. Eye and Ear and Director of the Harvard Infectious Disease Institute. "These are now targets for our research to design new types of antibiotics and disinfectants that specifically eliminate enterococci, to remove them as threats to hospitalized patients," added Francois Lebreton, Ph.D., first author of the study and project leader for the Gilmore team. Explore further: Research provides insight into new drug resistance in hospital microbes


(BOSTON) - Leading hospital "superbugs," known as the enterococci, arose from an ancestor that dates back 450 million years -- about the time when animals were first crawling onto land (and well before the age of dinosaurs), according to a new study led by researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear, the Harvard-wide Program on Antibiotic Resistance and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. Published online today in Cell, the study authors shed light on the evolutionary history of these pathogens, which evolved nearly indestructible properties and have become leading causes of modern antibiotic-resistant infections in hospitals. Antibiotic resistance is now a leading public health concern worldwide. Some microbes, often referred to as "superbugs," are resistant to virtually all antibiotics. This is of special concern in hospitals, where about 5 percent of hospitalized patients will fight infections that arise during their stay. As researchers around the world are urgently seeking solutions for this problem, insight into the origin and evolution of antibiotic resistance will help inform their search. "By analyzing the genomes and behaviors of today's enterococci, we were able to rewind the clock back to their earliest existence and piece together a picture of how these organisms were shaped into what they are today" said co-corresponding author Ashlee M. Earl, Ph.D., group leader for the Bacterial Genomics Group at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. "Understanding how the environment in which microbes live leads to new properties could help us to predict how microbes will adapt to the use of antibiotics, antimicrobial hand soaps, disinfectants and other products intended to control their spread." The picture the researchers pieced together begins with the dawn of life. Bacteria arose nearly 4 billion years ago, and the planet has teemed with them ever since, including the sea. Animals first arose in the sea during the time known as the Cambrian Explosion, 542 million years ago. As animals emerged in a sea of bacteria, bacteria learned to live in and on them. Some bacteria protect and serve the animals, as the healthy microbes in our intestines do today; others live in the environment, and still others cause disease. As animals crawled onto land about 100 million years later, they took their microbes with them. The authors of the Cell study found that all species of enterococci, including those that have never been found in hospitals, were naturally resistant to dryness, starvation, disinfectants and many antibiotics. Because enterococci normally live in the intestines of most (if not all) land animals, it seemed likely that they were also in the intestines of land animals that are now extinct, including dinosaurs and the first millipede-like organisms to crawl onto land. Comparison of the genomes of these bacteria provided evidence that this was indeed the case. In fact, the research team found that new species of enterococci appeared whenever new types of animals appeared. This includes when new types of animals arose right after they first crawled onto land, and when new types of animals arose right after mass extinctions, especially the greatest mass extinction, the End Permian Extinction (251 million years ago). From sea animals, like fish, intestinal microbes are excreted into the ocean, which usually contains about 5,000 mostly harmless bacteria per drop of water. They sink to the seafloor into microbe-rich sediments, and are consumed by worms, shellfish and other sea scavengers. Those are then eaten by fish, and the microbes continue to circulate throughout the food chain. However, on land, intestinal microbes are excreted as feces, where they often dry out and most die over time. Not the enterococci, however. These microbes are unusually hardy and can withstand drying out and starvation, which serves them well on land and in hospitals where disinfectants make it difficult for a microbe. "We now know what genes were gained by enterococci hundreds of millions of years ago, when they became resistant to drying out, and to disinfectants and antibiotics that attack their cell walls," said study leader Michael S. Gilmore, Ph.D., senior scientist at Mass. Eye and Ear and Director of the Harvard Infectious Disease Institute. "These are now targets for our research to design new types of antibiotics and disinfectants that specifically eliminate enterococci, to remove them as threats to hospitalized patients," added Francois Lebreton, Ph.D., first author of the study and project leader for the Gilmore team. In addition to Drs. Earl, Gilmore and Lebreton, authors on the Cell paper include Abigail L. Manson, Ph.D., and Timothy J. Straub, of the Broad Institue of MIT and Harvard, and Jose T. Saavedra, of Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This research study was supported by Department of Health and Human Services/National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases grants AI072360, AI083214, HHSN272200900018C and U19AI110818. Mass. Eye and Ear clinicians and scientists are driven by a mission to find cures for blindness, deafness and diseases of the head and neck. Now united with Schepens Eye Research Institute, Mass. Eye and Ear is the world's largest vision and hearing research center, developing new treatments and cures through discovery and innovation. Mass. Eye and Ear is a Harvard Medical School teaching hospital and trains future medical leaders in ophthalmology and otolaryngology, through residency as well as clinical and research fellowships. Internationally acclaimed since its founding in 1824, Mass. Eye and Ear employs full-time, board-certified physicians who offer high-quality and affordable specialty care that ranges from the routine to the very complex. In the 2016-2017 "Best Hospitals Survey," U.S. News & World Report ranked Mass. Eye and Ear #1 in the nation for ear, nose and throat care and #1 in New England for eye care. For more information about life-changing care and research, or to learn how you can help, please visit MassEyeAndEar.org. The Harvard Medical School (HMS) Department of Ophthalmology (eye.hms.harvard.edu) is one of the leading and largest academic departments of ophthalmology in the nation. More than 350 full-time faculty and trainees work at nine HMS affiliate institutions, including Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Massachusetts General Hospital, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston Children's Hospital, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Joslin Diabetes Center/Beetham Eye Institute, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, VA Maine Healthcare System, and Cambridge Health Alliance. Formally established in 1871, the department has been built upon a strong and rich foundation in medical education, research, and clinical care. Through the years, faculty and alumni have profoundly influenced ophthalmic science, medicine, and literature--helping to transform the field of ophthalmology from a branch of surgery into an independent medical specialty at the forefront of science. Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard was launched in 2004 to empower this generation of creative scientists to transform medicine. The Broad Institute seeks to describe all the molecular components of life and their connections; discover the molecular basis of major human diseases; develop effective new approaches to diagnostics and therapeutics; and disseminate discoveries, tools, methods, and data openly to the entire scientific community. Founded by MIT, Harvard, Harvard-affiliated hospitals and the visionary Los Angeles philanthropists Eli and Edythe L. Broad, the Broad Institute includes faculty, professional staff, and students from throughout the MIT and Harvard biomedical research communities and beyond, with collaborations spanning over a hundred private and public institutions in more than 40 countries worldwide. For further information about the Broad Institute, go to http://www. .


According to a new study, the bacteria enterococci have had more than 400 million years of practice to become the mighty hospital superbug that they are today (Credit: Janice Haney Carr) As the old saying goes, what doesn't kill you only makes you stronger – and this could very well be the life motto of enterococci, superbug extraordinaire. A new study by scientists at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard suggests that not only do they predate the dinosaurs, they have also managed to survive everything that Nature has thrown at them, each time evolving to become more indestructible. Could deciphering their genetic blueprint bring us one step closer to defeating them? Enterococci are gut-dwelling bacteria that are found in practically all living things, from worms to human beings. It is extremely hardy, so much so that it could be the inspiration for the next comic book superhero (or villain). Antibiotics, disinfectants, drying, starvation and toxic compounds such as sodium azide have little effect on it, and in the 1970s and 1980s, scientists started getting an inkling of how much of a problem it could be when enterococci emerged as one of the earliest antibiotic-resistant pathogens. There are thousands of microbes that live in our gut, so how did this one particular bug evolve to become such a badass? In their quest for an answer, the study's researchers examined DNA from 24 species of enterococci, taken from the guts of various living things, including human beings. They then examined the genes, comparing the ones from existing enterococci to those of close relatives, to figure out which were unique to it and built an evolutionary timeline to estimate when these traits started to emerge. "By analyzing the genomes and behaviors of today's enterococci, we were able to rewind the clock back to their earliest existence and piece together a picture of how these organisms were shaped into what they are today," explains geneticist and study author Ashlee Earl, group leader for the Bacterial Genomics Group at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. "Understanding how the environment in which microbes live leads to new properties that could help us to predict how microbes will adapt to the use of antibiotics, antimicrobial hand soaps, disinfectants and other products intended to control their spread." What emerged from this analysis reveals a fascinating origin story that goes all the way back to more than 400 million years ago. Bacteria have been around since the dawn of time. The ancient oceans were teeming with all kinds of microbes and enterococci's forebears were among them, living in the guts of prehistoric aquatic creatures. Their peaceful existence was given a jolt when the Cambrian Explosion happened and as some of the oceans' critters started taking their first tentative steps on land around 100 million years later, they brought along with them the bacteria in their intestines, among them – you guessed it – enterococci. This transition from water to land was a test of enterococci's survival instincts and it rose mightily to the challenge, evolving to survive its new and harsh environment. Unlike the moist, nutrient-rich waters of the sea, land-based environments are harsher and normally, intestinal microbes dry out and die when they are excreted from their host's body. Not enterococci. All the strains that were sampled in the study – including those not found in hospitals – were found to be naturally resistant to dryness, starvation, disinfectants and many kinds of antibiotics – traits that the researchers believe were also shared by their ancestors. In fact, when they compared the genomes of these bacteria, they found that every time new species of animals appeared during key evolutionary points such as the End Permian Extinction, they were always accompanied by the emergence of new species of enterococci. The researchers suggest that the bacteria's unique genes helped them thrive in their new environment by strengthening their cell walls, thus enabling them to withstand the dry conditions of land and (unhappily for us) making them impervious to disinfectants and antibiotics. Today, antibiotic-resistant enterococci are responsible for a range of illnesses in hospitals, including bloodstream, surgical site and urinary tract infections. What makes this so worrying is that some strains have become resistant to vancomycin, an antibiotic of last resort that is given when all other treatments fail. The very sick are the most vulnerable to the bacteria and according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, these vancomycin-resistant strains account for about 20,000 (or 30 percent) of enterococcus infections among hospitalized patients, with more than 1,000 cases ending in death each year. Could this new insight into their genetic blueprint help scientists cripple it? The researchers believe so. "We now know what genes were gained by enterococci hundreds of millions of years ago, when they became resistant to drying out, and to disinfectants and antibiotics that attack their cell walls," says study leader Michael Gilmore, director of the Harvard Infectious Disease Institute. "These are now targets for our research to design new types of antibiotics and disinfectants that specifically eliminate enterococci, to remove them as threats to hospitalized patients," adds his colleague Francois Lebreton. The study was published in Cell Reports.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

SANTA CLARA, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Agilent Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: A) today reported revenue of $1.10 billion, up 8 percent year over year (up 9 percent on a core basis(2)) for the second fiscal quarter ended April 30, 2017. Second-quarter GAAP net income was $164 million, or $0.50 per share. Last year’s second-quarter GAAP net income was $91 million, or $0.28 per share. During the second quarter, Agilent had intangible amortization of $31 million, acquisition and integration costs of $7 million, and $2 million in other costs. Excluding these items and a tax benefit of $17 million, Agilent reported second-quarter non-GAAP net income of $187 million, or $0.58 per share(1). “The Agilent team delivered another excellent quarter,” said Mike McMullen, Agilent President and CEO. “Both revenue and earnings per share exceeded the high range of guidance. We saw a strong pick up in the Chemical and Energy business after modest gains last quarter, and strong growth in Pharma and Europe also contributed to the upside.” “We continue to deliver on our long-term focus of driving above market growth, expanding operating margins, and deploying capital in a balanced manner,” he added. “Looking ahead, we are confident in our company’s prospects, and we are raising our full-year core revenue growth and earnings expectations.” Second-quarter revenue of $523 million from Agilent’s Life Sciences and Applied Markets Group (LSAG) grew 6 percent year over year (up 6 percent on a core basis(2)), with double-digit growth in chemical and energy, pharma and environmental markets. LSAG’s operating margin for the quarter was 21.1 percent. Second-quarter revenue of $378 million from Agilent CrossLab Group (ACG) grew 9 percent year over year (up 10 percent on a core basis(2)). Both services and consumables continued to see solid growth across all geographies. ACG’s operating margin for the quarter was 21.6 percent. Second-quarter revenue of $201 million from Agilent’s Diagnostics and Genomics Group (DGG) grew 13 percent year over year (up 13 percent on a core basis(2)) led by pharma and diagnostic and clinical end-markets. DGG’s operating margin for the quarter was 24.2 percent. Agilent expects third-quarter 2017 revenue in the range of $1.06 billion to $1.08 billion. Third-quarter non-GAAP earnings are expected to be in the range of $0.49 to $0.51 per share(3). For fiscal year 2017, Agilent expects revenue of $4.36 billion to $4.38 billion and non-GAAP earnings of $2.15 to $2.21 per share(3). The guidance is based on April 28, 2017 currency exchange rates. Agilent Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: A), a global leader in life sciences, diagnostics and applied chemical markets, is the premier laboratory partner for a better world. Agilent works with customers in more than 100 countries, providing instruments, software, services and consumables for the entire laboratory workflow. Agilent generated revenue of $4.20 billion in fiscal 2016. The company employs about 13,000 people worldwide. Information about Agilent is available at www.agilent.com. Agilent’s management will present more details about its second-quarter FY2017 financial results on a conference call with investors today at 1:30 p.m. PT. This event will be webcast live in listen-only mode. Listeners may log on at www.investor.agilent.com and select “Q2 2017 Agilent Technologies Inc. Earnings Conference Call” in the “News & Events Calendar of Events” section. The webcast will remain available on the company’s website for 90 days. Additional information regarding financial results can be found at www.investor.agilent.com by selecting “Financial Results” in the “Financial Information” section. A telephone replay of the conference call will be available at approximately 4:30 p.m. PST today through May 29, 2017 by dialing +1 800-585-8367 (or +1 404-537-3406 from outside the United States) and entering pass code 8574751. This news release contains forward-looking statements as defined in the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and is subject to the safe harbors created therein. The forward-looking statements contained herein include, but are not limited to, information regarding Agilent’s future revenue, earnings and profitability; planned new products; market trends; the future demand for the company’s products and services; customer expectations; and revenue and non-GAAP earnings guidance for the third quarter and full fiscal year 2017. These forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that could cause Agilent’s results to differ materially from management’s current expectations. Such risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, unforeseen changes in the strength of our customers’ businesses; unforeseen changes in the demand for current and new products, technologies, and services; unforeseen changes in the currency markets; customer purchasing decisions and timing, and the risk that we are not able to realize the savings expected from integration and restructuring activities. In addition, other risks that Agilent faces in running its operations include the ability to execute successfully through business cycles; the ability to meet and achieve the benefits of its cost-reduction goals and otherwise successfully adapt its cost structures to continuing changes in business conditions; ongoing competitive, pricing and gross-margin pressures; the risk that our cost-cutting initiatives will impair our ability to develop products and remain competitive and to operate effectively; the impact of geopolitical uncertainties and global economic conditions on our operations, our markets and our ability to conduct business; the ability to improve asset performance to adapt to changes in demand; the ability of our supply chain to adapt to changes in demand; the ability to successfully introduce new products at the right time, price and mix; the ability of Agilent to successfully integrate recent acquisitions; the ability of Agilent to successfully comply with certain complex regulations; and other risks detailed in Agilent’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including our quarterly report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended Jan. 31, 2017. Forward-looking statements are based on the beliefs and assumptions of Agilent’s management and on currently available information. Agilent undertakes no responsibility to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement. (1) Non-GAAP net income and non-GAAP earnings per share primarily excludes the impacts of acquisition and integration costs, transformation initiatives, business exit and divestiture costs, non-cash intangibles amortization, and pension settlement and curtailment gains. We also exclude any tax benefits that are not directly related to ongoing operations and which are either isolated or is not expected to occur again with any regularity or predictability. A reconciliation between non-GAAP net income and GAAP net income is set forth on page 6 of the attached tables along with additional information regarding the use of this non-GAAP measure. (2) Core revenue growth excludes the impact of currency, the NMR business and acquisitions and divestitures within the past 12 months. Core revenue is a non-GAAP measure. A reconciliation between Q2 FY17 GAAP revenue and core revenue is set forth on page 8 of the attached tables along with additional information regarding the use of this non-GAAP measure. Core revenue growth as projected for full fiscal year 2017 excludes the impact of currency, the NMR business and acquisitions and divestitures within the past 12 months. Most of these exclude amounts that pertain to events that have not yet occurred and are not currently possible to estimate with a reasonable degree of accuracy and could differ materially. Therefore, no reconciliation to GAAP amounts has been provided. (3) Non-GAAP earnings per share as projected for Q3 FY17 and full fiscal year 2017 excludes primarily the future impact of acquisition and integration costs, pension settlement gain, and non-cash intangibles amortization. We also exclude any tax benefits that are not directly related to ongoing operations and which are either isolated or is not expected to occur again with any regularity or predictability. Most of these excluded amounts that pertain to events that have not yet occurred and are not currently possible to estimate with a reasonable degree of accuracy and could differ materially. Therefore, no reconciliation to GAAP amounts has been provided. Future amortization of intangibles is expected to be approximately $30 million per quarter. NOTE TO EDITORS: Further technology, corporate citizenship and executive news is available on the Agilent news site at www.agilent.com/go/news.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

A dangerous bacteria found in hospitals might have originated from an ancestor that lived in the guts of the first animals to walk on land, according to a new study. The bacteria, called Enterococcus, is a so-called superbug, meaning it is resistant to antibiotics and cleaning products. In the new study, the researchers found that some of the same traits that give this superbug its dangerous resistance today might have helped it survive as its ancient animal hosts transitioned from water to land, some 450 million years ago, the researchers said. [6 Superbugs to Watch Out For] By analyzing the genomes and growing patterns of Enterococcus, the researchers "were able to rewind the clock back to their earliest existence and piece together a picture of how these organisms were shaped into what they are today," study co-author Ashlee Earl, group leader for the Bacterial Genomics Group at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, said in a statement. Enterococcus bacteria are found normally in the human gut, but they can cause infections in the blood, urinary tract and other organs. The researchers were interested in the question of why Enterococcus appears to be so well adapted to surviving in modern hospitals and resisting many types of antibiotics. Infection with Enterococcus bacteria is one of the top causes of hospital-acquired infections, according to Medscape. The researchers analyzed genetic data from a number of Enterococcus species to determine when this genus originated. (The researchers did this by using a technique that takes into account the expected rate of change of the bacteria's DNA, allowing them to estimate when this genus would have emerged.) The scientists estimated that Enterococcus originated about 425 million to 500 million years ago, around the time when animals first moved from the ocean to land. The researchers also found that, when Enterococcus diverged evolutionarily from a closely related genus called Vagococcus, the former acquired genes for a hardened cell wall and a better ability to cope with environmental stress. In a separate experiment, the researchers grew Enterococcus species in lab dishes under a number of different conditions. They found that Enterococcus was better able to grow in harsh conditions — such as dryness, starvation and exposure to disinfectants — compared with other closely related bacteria. All of the Enterococcus species tested in the study were also naturally resistant to a number of antibiotics, even if the species had never before been found in a hospital, the researchers said. Together, the findings suggest that Enterococcus emerged from ancestors that lived in the guts of animals as they transitioned from living in water to living on land, the researchers said. In a water environment, bacteria living in the guts of animals are excreted into the ocean, sink to the seafloor and are consumed by sea scavengers that are later eaten by other fish. However, on land, bacteria are excreted in feces, and may be left alone for long periods to dry out and die, the researchers said. But Enterococcus bacteria are especially adapted to surviving in these dry, harsh conditions, the scientists said. The same traits that allowed Enterococcus' ancestors to survive a dry environment, starvation and other harsh conditions on land appear to have helped these bacteria survive in modern hospitals. "Life on land would have selected for the precise traits that now allow pathogenic [Enterococcus] to survive desiccation, starvation and disinfection in the modern hospital," the researchers wrote in their paper, published today (May 11) in the journal Cell. The researchers plan to conduct further studies on the genes that allow Enterococcus to survive harsh conditions, with the hope that they may be able to design new types of antibiotics and disinfectants that specifically target this type of bacteria. The researchers noted that their study presents a hypothesis that fits with their data but that it's difficult to prove definitely, given the hundreds of millions of years that have passed since animals first crawled onto land.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.accesswire.com

LONDON, UK / ACCESSWIRE / February 21, 2017 / Active Wall St. announces its post-earnings coverage on Agilent Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: A). The Company announced its first quarter fiscal 2017 financial results on February 14, 2017. The scientific instrument maker reported eighth consecutive quarter of improving profitability and also raised its core revenue guidance for the year. Register with us now for your free membership at: One of Agilent Technologies' competitors within the Medical Laboratories & Research space, Quintiles IMS Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: Q), reported its Q4 and full-year 2016 financial results and issued its 2017 guidance on Tuesday, February 14, 2017. AWS will be initiating a research report on Quintiles IMS Holdings in the coming days. Today, AWS is promoting its earnings coverage on A; touching on Q. Get our free coverage by signing up to: For the period ended January 31, 2017, Agilent reported revenue of $1.07 billion, up 3.8% or 4.8% on core basis compared to revenue of $1.03 billion in Q1 FY16. The Company's revenue numbers surpassed analysts' consensus of $1.04 billion. For Q1 FY17, Agilent reported GAAP net income of $168 million, or $0.52 per share, compared to GAAP net income of $121 million, or $0.36 per share, for Q1 FY16. During the reported quarter, Agilent had intangible amortization of $31 million, acquisition and integration costs of $16 million, transformation costs of $2 million, and $2 million of other costs. Excluding these items, a pension settlement gain of $32 million and a tax benefit of $15 million, Agilent reported Q1 FY17 non-GAAP net income of $172 million, or $0.53 per share, exceeding Wall Street's expectations for earnings of $0.49 per share. Mike McMullen, Agilent's President and CEO stated in regards to the Company's results: "Our strong revenue results were driven by a return to growth in our Chemical & Energy business and higher-than-expected China growth. Overall, we are confident in the Company's prospects, and we are raising our full-year core revenue growth expectations." For Q1 FY17, Agilent reported adjusted operating margin of 21.2%, up 100 basis points from Q1 FY16, and operating cash flow of $116 million, $5 million higher than Q1 of last year. During Q1 FY17, Agilent paid $42 million in dividends and repurchased 2.5 million shares for $111 million in the reported quarter. The Company closed on $70 million Multiplicom acquisition in January 2017. For Q1 FY17, the Company's revenue of $540 million from Agilent's Life Sciences and Applied Markets Group (LSAG) grew 3% on y-o-y basis, or 4% on a core basis, with strength in Pharma, food, chemical, and energy. LSAG's operating margin for the reported quarter was 23.4%. The Company's Agilent CrossLab Group (ACG) revenue grew 6% y-o-y, or 7% on a core basis, to $363 million. Both services and consumables experienced healthy growth across all geographies. ACG's operating margin for the reported quarter was 20.3%. During Q1 FY17, Agilent's Diagnostics and Genomics Group (DGG) generated revenue of $164 million, up 4% on y-o-y and core basis, led by strength in Dako-branded products and nucleic acid solutions. The segment's operating margin totaled 14.3% for the reported quarter. On a geographical basis, Agilent reported delivering low double digit growth in Q1FY17 in China, above the Company's expectations. The Americas reported growth in mid-single digits, with strength in the United States. Europe and Japan remained flat. For FY17, Agilent expects revenue of $4.33 billion to $4.35 billion and non-GAAP earnings of $2.10 to $2.16 per share. The Company is raising the core revenue growth guidance of 4.0% to 4.5% provided in November by 25 basis points, or $11 million. The new core revenue growth guidance is therefore 4.25% to 4.75%. However, Agilent noted that the strengthening of the US dollar since its November guidance is expected to have a negative impact of about $36 million on full-year reported revenues. The Company's FY17 guidance of $825 million operating cash flow, $200 million CapEx, and buyback of $430 million for the year remained unchanged. For Q2 FY17, Agilent expects revenue in the range of $1.04 billion to $1.06 billion, where the midpoint corresponds to a core revenue growth of 3.5%. The Company's non-GAAP earnings are expected to be in the range of $0.47 to $0.49 per share for Q2 FY17, a 9% y-o-y increase at midpoint. At the closing bell, on Friday, February 17, 2017, Agilent Technologies' stock climbed 1.55%, ending the trading session at $51.63. A total volume of 2.20 million shares were traded at the end of the day, which was higher than the 3-month average volume of 2.05 million shares. In the last three months and previous twelve months, shares of the Company have advanced 12.13% and 39.41%, respectively. Moreover, the stock surged 13.32% since the start of the year. The Company's shares are trading at a PE ratio of 33.22 and have a dividend yield of 1.03%. Active Wall Street (AWS) produces regular sponsored and non-sponsored reports, articles, stock market blogs, and popular investment newsletters covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and micro-cap stocks. AWS has two distinct and independent departments. One department produces non-sponsored analyst certified content generally in the form of press releases, articles and reports covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and the other produces sponsored content (in most cases not reviewed by a registered analyst), which typically consists of compensated investment newsletters, articles and reports covering listed stocks and micro-caps. Such sponsored content is outside the scope of procedures detailed below. AWS has not been compensated; directly or indirectly; for producing or publishing this document. The non-sponsored content contained herein has been prepared by a writer (the "Author") and is fact checked and reviewed by a third party research service company (the "Reviewer") represented by a credentialed financial analyst, for further information on analyst credentials, please email [email protected]. Rohit Tuli, a CFA® charterholder (the "Sponsor"), provides necessary guidance in preparing the document templates. The Reviewer has reviewed and revised the content, as necessary, based on publicly available information which is believed to be reliable. Content is researched, written and reviewed on a reasonable-effort basis. The Reviewer has not performed any independent investigations or forensic audits to validate the information herein. The Reviewer has only independently reviewed the information provided by the Author according to the procedures outlined by AWS. AWS is not entitled to veto or interfere in the application of such procedures by the third-party research service company to the articles, documents or reports, as the case may be. Unless otherwise noted, any content outside of this document has no association with the Author or the Reviewer in any way. AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer are not responsible for any error which may be occasioned at the time of printing of this document or any error, mistake or shortcoming. No liability is accepted whatsoever for any direct, indirect or consequential loss arising from the use of this document. AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer expressly disclaim any fiduciary responsibility or liability for any consequences, financial or otherwise arising from any reliance placed on the information in this document. Additionally, AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer do not (1) guarantee the accuracy, timeliness, completeness or correct sequencing of the information, or (2) warrant any results from use of the information. The included information is subject to change without notice. This document is not intended as an offering, recommendation, or a solicitation of an offer to buy or sell the securities mentioned or discussed, and is to be used for informational purposes only. Please read all associated disclosures and disclaimers in full before investing. Neither AWS nor any party affiliated with us is a registered investment adviser or broker-dealer with any agency or in any jurisdiction whatsoever. To download our report(s), read our disclosures, or for more information, visit http://www.activewallst.com/disclaimer/. For any questions, inquiries, or comments reach out to us directly. If you're a company we are covering and wish to no longer feature on our coverage list contact us via email and/or phone between 09:30 EDT to 16:00 EDT from Monday to Friday at: CFA® and Chartered Financial Analyst® are registered trademarks owned by CFA Institute.


News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

LONDON, UK / ACCESSWIRE / February 21, 2017 / Active Wall St. announces its post-earnings coverage on Agilent Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: A). The Company announced its first quarter fiscal 2017 financial results on February 14, 2017. The scientific instrument maker reported eighth consecutive quarter of improving profitability and also raised its core revenue guidance for the year. Register with us now for your free membership at: One of Agilent Technologies' competitors within the Medical Laboratories & Research space, Quintiles IMS Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: Q), reported its Q4 and full-year 2016 financial results and issued its 2017 guidance on Tuesday, February 14, 2017. AWS will be initiating a research report on Quintiles IMS Holdings in the coming days. Today, AWS is promoting its earnings coverage on A; touching on Q. Get our free coverage by signing up to: For the period ended January 31, 2017, Agilent reported revenue of $1.07 billion, up 3.8% or 4.8% on core basis compared to revenue of $1.03 billion in Q1 FY16. The Company's revenue numbers surpassed analysts' consensus of $1.04 billion. For Q1 FY17, Agilent reported GAAP net income of $168 million, or $0.52 per share, compared to GAAP net income of $121 million, or $0.36 per share, for Q1 FY16. During the reported quarter, Agilent had intangible amortization of $31 million, acquisition and integration costs of $16 million, transformation costs of $2 million, and $2 million of other costs. Excluding these items, a pension settlement gain of $32 million and a tax benefit of $15 million, Agilent reported Q1 FY17 non-GAAP net income of $172 million, or $0.53 per share, exceeding Wall Street's expectations for earnings of $0.49 per share. Mike McMullen, Agilent's President and CEO stated in regards to the Company's results: "Our strong revenue results were driven by a return to growth in our Chemical & Energy business and higher-than-expected China growth. Overall, we are confident in the Company's prospects, and we are raising our full-year core revenue growth expectations." For Q1 FY17, Agilent reported adjusted operating margin of 21.2%, up 100 basis points from Q1 FY16, and operating cash flow of $116 million, $5 million higher than Q1 of last year. During Q1 FY17, Agilent paid $42 million in dividends and repurchased 2.5 million shares for $111 million in the reported quarter. The Company closed on $70 million Multiplicom acquisition in January 2017. For Q1 FY17, the Company's revenue of $540 million from Agilent's Life Sciences and Applied Markets Group (LSAG) grew 3% on y-o-y basis, or 4% on a core basis, with strength in Pharma, food, chemical, and energy. LSAG's operating margin for the reported quarter was 23.4%. The Company's Agilent CrossLab Group (ACG) revenue grew 6% y-o-y, or 7% on a core basis, to $363 million. Both services and consumables experienced healthy growth across all geographies. ACG's operating margin for the reported quarter was 20.3%. During Q1 FY17, Agilent's Diagnostics and Genomics Group (DGG) generated revenue of $164 million, up 4% on y-o-y and core basis, led by strength in Dako-branded products and nucleic acid solutions. The segment's operating margin totaled 14.3% for the reported quarter. On a geographical basis, Agilent reported delivering low double digit growth in Q1FY17 in China, above the Company's expectations. The Americas reported growth in mid-single digits, with strength in the United States. Europe and Japan remained flat. For FY17, Agilent expects revenue of $4.33 billion to $4.35 billion and non-GAAP earnings of $2.10 to $2.16 per share. The Company is raising the core revenue growth guidance of 4.0% to 4.5% provided in November by 25 basis points, or $11 million. The new core revenue growth guidance is therefore 4.25% to 4.75%. However, Agilent noted that the strengthening of the US dollar since its November guidance is expected to have a negative impact of about $36 million on full-year reported revenues. The Company's FY17 guidance of $825 million operating cash flow, $200 million CapEx, and buyback of $430 million for the year remained unchanged. For Q2 FY17, Agilent expects revenue in the range of $1.04 billion to $1.06 billion, where the midpoint corresponds to a core revenue growth of 3.5%. The Company's non-GAAP earnings are expected to be in the range of $0.47 to $0.49 per share for Q2 FY17, a 9% y-o-y increase at midpoint. At the closing bell, on Friday, February 17, 2017, Agilent Technologies' stock climbed 1.55%, ending the trading session at $51.63. A total volume of 2.20 million shares were traded at the end of the day, which was higher than the 3-month average volume of 2.05 million shares. In the last three months and previous twelve months, shares of the Company have advanced 12.13% and 39.41%, respectively. Moreover, the stock surged 13.32% since the start of the year. The Company's shares are trading at a PE ratio of 33.22 and have a dividend yield of 1.03%. Active Wall Street (AWS) produces regular sponsored and non-sponsored reports, articles, stock market blogs, and popular investment newsletters covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and micro-cap stocks. AWS has two distinct and independent departments. One department produces non-sponsored analyst certified content generally in the form of press releases, articles and reports covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and the other produces sponsored content (in most cases not reviewed by a registered analyst), which typically consists of compensated investment newsletters, articles and reports covering listed stocks and micro-caps. Such sponsored content is outside the scope of procedures detailed below. AWS has not been compensated; directly or indirectly; for producing or publishing this document. The non-sponsored content contained herein has been prepared by a writer (the "Author") and is fact checked and reviewed by a third party research service company (the "Reviewer") represented by a credentialed financial analyst, for further information on analyst credentials, please email info@activewallst.com. Rohit Tuli, a CFA® charterholder (the "Sponsor"), provides necessary guidance in preparing the document templates. The Reviewer has reviewed and revised the content, as necessary, based on publicly available information which is believed to be reliable. Content is researched, written and reviewed on a reasonable-effort basis. The Reviewer has not performed any independent investigations or forensic audits to validate the information herein. The Reviewer has only independently reviewed the information provided by the Author according to the procedures outlined by AWS. AWS is not entitled to veto or interfere in the application of such procedures by the third-party research service company to the articles, documents or reports, as the case may be. Unless otherwise noted, any content outside of this document has no association with the Author or the Reviewer in any way. AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer are not responsible for any error which may be occasioned at the time of printing of this document or any error, mistake or shortcoming. No liability is accepted whatsoever for any direct, indirect or consequential loss arising from the use of this document. AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer expressly disclaim any fiduciary responsibility or liability for any consequences, financial or otherwise arising from any reliance placed on the information in this document. Additionally, AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer do not (1) guarantee the accuracy, timeliness, completeness or correct sequencing of the information, or (2) warrant any results from use of the information. The included information is subject to change without notice. This document is not intended as an offering, recommendation, or a solicitation of an offer to buy or sell the securities mentioned or discussed, and is to be used for informational purposes only. Please read all associated disclosures and disclaimers in full before investing. Neither AWS nor any party affiliated with us is a registered investment adviser or broker-dealer with any agency or in any jurisdiction whatsoever. To download our report(s), read our disclosures, or for more information, visit http://www.activewallst.com/disclaimer/. For any questions, inquiries, or comments reach out to us directly. If you're a company we are covering and wish to no longer feature on our coverage list contact us via email and/or phone between 09:30 EDT to 16:00 EDT from Monday to Friday at: CFA® and Chartered Financial Analyst® are registered trademarks owned by CFA Institute. LONDON, UK / ACCESSWIRE / February 21, 2017 / Active Wall St. announces its post-earnings coverage on Agilent Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: A). The Company announced its first quarter fiscal 2017 financial results on February 14, 2017. The scientific instrument maker reported eighth consecutive quarter of improving profitability and also raised its core revenue guidance for the year. Register with us now for your free membership at: One of Agilent Technologies' competitors within the Medical Laboratories & Research space, Quintiles IMS Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: Q), reported its Q4 and full-year 2016 financial results and issued its 2017 guidance on Tuesday, February 14, 2017. AWS will be initiating a research report on Quintiles IMS Holdings in the coming days. Today, AWS is promoting its earnings coverage on A; touching on Q. Get our free coverage by signing up to: For the period ended January 31, 2017, Agilent reported revenue of $1.07 billion, up 3.8% or 4.8% on core basis compared to revenue of $1.03 billion in Q1 FY16. The Company's revenue numbers surpassed analysts' consensus of $1.04 billion. For Q1 FY17, Agilent reported GAAP net income of $168 million, or $0.52 per share, compared to GAAP net income of $121 million, or $0.36 per share, for Q1 FY16. During the reported quarter, Agilent had intangible amortization of $31 million, acquisition and integration costs of $16 million, transformation costs of $2 million, and $2 million of other costs. Excluding these items, a pension settlement gain of $32 million and a tax benefit of $15 million, Agilent reported Q1 FY17 non-GAAP net income of $172 million, or $0.53 per share, exceeding Wall Street's expectations for earnings of $0.49 per share. Mike McMullen, Agilent's President and CEO stated in regards to the Company's results: "Our strong revenue results were driven by a return to growth in our Chemical & Energy business and higher-than-expected China growth. Overall, we are confident in the Company's prospects, and we are raising our full-year core revenue growth expectations." For Q1 FY17, Agilent reported adjusted operating margin of 21.2%, up 100 basis points from Q1 FY16, and operating cash flow of $116 million, $5 million higher than Q1 of last year. During Q1 FY17, Agilent paid $42 million in dividends and repurchased 2.5 million shares for $111 million in the reported quarter. The Company closed on $70 million Multiplicom acquisition in January 2017. For Q1 FY17, the Company's revenue of $540 million from Agilent's Life Sciences and Applied Markets Group (LSAG) grew 3% on y-o-y basis, or 4% on a core basis, with strength in Pharma, food, chemical, and energy. LSAG's operating margin for the reported quarter was 23.4%. The Company's Agilent CrossLab Group (ACG) revenue grew 6% y-o-y, or 7% on a core basis, to $363 million. Both services and consumables experienced healthy growth across all geographies. ACG's operating margin for the reported quarter was 20.3%. During Q1 FY17, Agilent's Diagnostics and Genomics Group (DGG) generated revenue of $164 million, up 4% on y-o-y and core basis, led by strength in Dako-branded products and nucleic acid solutions. The segment's operating margin totaled 14.3% for the reported quarter. On a geographical basis, Agilent reported delivering low double digit growth in Q1FY17 in China, above the Company's expectations. The Americas reported growth in mid-single digits, with strength in the United States. Europe and Japan remained flat. For FY17, Agilent expects revenue of $4.33 billion to $4.35 billion and non-GAAP earnings of $2.10 to $2.16 per share. The Company is raising the core revenue growth guidance of 4.0% to 4.5% provided in November by 25 basis points, or $11 million. The new core revenue growth guidance is therefore 4.25% to 4.75%. However, Agilent noted that the strengthening of the US dollar since its November guidance is expected to have a negative impact of about $36 million on full-year reported revenues. The Company's FY17 guidance of $825 million operating cash flow, $200 million CapEx, and buyback of $430 million for the year remained unchanged. For Q2 FY17, Agilent expects revenue in the range of $1.04 billion to $1.06 billion, where the midpoint corresponds to a core revenue growth of 3.5%. The Company's non-GAAP earnings are expected to be in the range of $0.47 to $0.49 per share for Q2 FY17, a 9% y-o-y increase at midpoint. At the closing bell, on Friday, February 17, 2017, Agilent Technologies' stock climbed 1.55%, ending the trading session at $51.63. A total volume of 2.20 million shares were traded at the end of the day, which was higher than the 3-month average volume of 2.05 million shares. In the last three months and previous twelve months, shares of the Company have advanced 12.13% and 39.41%, respectively. Moreover, the stock surged 13.32% since the start of the year. The Company's shares are trading at a PE ratio of 33.22 and have a dividend yield of 1.03%. Active Wall Street (AWS) produces regular sponsored and non-sponsored reports, articles, stock market blogs, and popular investment newsletters covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and micro-cap stocks. AWS has two distinct and independent departments. One department produces non-sponsored analyst certified content generally in the form of press releases, articles and reports covering equities listed on NYSE and NASDAQ and the other produces sponsored content (in most cases not reviewed by a registered analyst), which typically consists of compensated investment newsletters, articles and reports covering listed stocks and micro-caps. Such sponsored content is outside the scope of procedures detailed below. AWS has not been compensated; directly or indirectly; for producing or publishing this document. The non-sponsored content contained herein has been prepared by a writer (the "Author") and is fact checked and reviewed by a third party research service company (the "Reviewer") represented by a credentialed financial analyst, for further information on analyst credentials, please email info@activewallst.com. Rohit Tuli, a CFA® charterholder (the "Sponsor"), provides necessary guidance in preparing the document templates. The Reviewer has reviewed and revised the content, as necessary, based on publicly available information which is believed to be reliable. Content is researched, written and reviewed on a reasonable-effort basis. The Reviewer has not performed any independent investigations or forensic audits to validate the information herein. The Reviewer has only independently reviewed the information provided by the Author according to the procedures outlined by AWS. AWS is not entitled to veto or interfere in the application of such procedures by the third-party research service company to the articles, documents or reports, as the case may be. Unless otherwise noted, any content outside of this document has no association with the Author or the Reviewer in any way. AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer are not responsible for any error which may be occasioned at the time of printing of this document or any error, mistake or shortcoming. No liability is accepted whatsoever for any direct, indirect or consequential loss arising from the use of this document. AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer expressly disclaim any fiduciary responsibility or liability for any consequences, financial or otherwise arising from any reliance placed on the information in this document. Additionally, AWS, the Author, and the Reviewer do not (1) guarantee the accuracy, timeliness, completeness or correct sequencing of the information, or (2) warrant any results from use of the information. The included information is subject to change without notice. This document is not intended as an offering, recommendation, or a solicitation of an offer to buy or sell the securities mentioned or discussed, and is to be used for informational purposes only. Please read all associated disclosures and disclaimers in full before investing. Neither AWS nor any party affiliated with us is a registered investment adviser or broker-dealer with any agency or in any jurisdiction whatsoever. To download our report(s), read our disclosures, or for more information, visit http://www.activewallst.com/disclaimer/. For any questions, inquiries, or comments reach out to us directly. If you're a company we are covering and wish to no longer feature on our coverage list contact us via email and/or phone between 09:30 EDT to 16:00 EDT from Monday to Friday at: CFA® and Chartered Financial Analyst® are registered trademarks owned by CFA Institute.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

SANTA CLARA, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Agilent Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: A) today reported revenue of $1.07 billion, up 3.8 percent year over year (up 4.8 percent on a core basis(2)) for the first fiscal quarter ended Jan. 31, 2017. First-quarter GAAP net income was $168 million, or $0.52 per share. Last year’s first-quarter GAAP net income was $121 million, or $0.36 per share. During the first quarter, Agilent had intangible amortization of $31 million, acquisition and integration costs of $16 million, transformation costs of $2 million and $2 million of other costs. Excluding these items, a pension settlement gain of $32 million and a tax benefit of $15 million, Agilent reported first-quarter non-GAAP net income of $172 million, or $0.53 per share(1). “ The Agilent team started 2017 with another strong quarter, despite currency headwinds,” said Mike McMullen, Agilent president and CEO. “ Our first-quarter revenue and non-GAAP earnings per share(1) exceeded the high end of November’s guidance. “ Our strong revenue results were driven by a return to growth in our Chemical & Energy business and higher-than-expected China growth. Overall, we are confident in the company’s prospects, and we are raising our full-year core revenue growth expectations,” McMullen added. First-quarter revenue of $540 million from Agilent’s Life Sciences and Applied Markets Group (LSAG) grew 3 percent year over year (up 4 percent on a core basis(2)), with strength in pharma, food, chemical and energy. LSAG’s Q1 operating margin for the quarter was 23.4 percent. First-quarter revenue of $363 million from the Agilent CrossLab Group (ACG) grew 6 percent year over year (up 7 percent on a core basis(2)). Both services and consumables experienced healthy growth across all geographies. ACG’s operating margin for the quarter was 20.3 percent. First-quarter revenue of $164 million from Agilent’s Diagnostics and Genomics Group (DGG) grew 4 percent year over year (also up 4 percent on a core basis(2)), led by strength in Dako-branded products and nucleic acid solutions. DGG’s operating margin for the quarter was 14.3 percent. Agilent expects second-quarter 2017 revenue in the range of $1.04 billion to $1.06 billion. Second-quarter non-GAAP earnings are expected to be in the range of $0.47 to $0.49 per share(3). For fiscal year 2017, Agilent expects revenue of $4.33 billion to $4.35 billion and non-GAAP earnings of $2.10 to $2.16 per share(3). The guidance is based on Jan. 31, 2017 currency exchange rates. Agilent Technologies, Inc. (NYSE: A), a global leader in life sciences, diagnostics and applied chemical markets, is the premier laboratory partner for a better world. Agilent works with customers in more than 100 countries, providing instruments, software, services and consumables for the entire laboratory workflow. Agilent generated revenue of $4.20 billion in fiscal 2016. The company employs about 12,500 people worldwide. Information about Agilent is available at www.agilent.com. Agilent’s management will present more details about its first-quarter FY2017 financial results on a conference call with investors today at 1:30 p.m. PT. This event will be webcast live in listen-only mode. Listeners may log on at www.investor.agilent.com and select “ Q1 2017 Agilent Technologies Inc. Earnings Conference Call” in the “News & Events Calendar of Events” section. The webcast will remain available on the company’s website for 90 days. Additional information regarding financial results can be found at www.investor.agilent.com by selecting “Financial Results” in the “Financial Information” section. A telephone replay of the conference call will be available at approximately 4:30 p.m. PST today through Feb. 21 by dialing +1 855-859-2056 (or +1 404-537-3406 from outside the United States) and entering pass code 56828410. This news release contains forward-looking statements as defined in the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and is subject to the safe harbors created therein. The forward-looking statements contained herein include, but are not limited to, information regarding Agilent’s future revenue, earnings and profitability; planned new products; market trends; the future demand for the company’s products and services; customer expectations; and revenue and non-GAAP earnings guidance for the second quarter and full fiscal year 2017. These forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that could cause Agilent’s results to differ materially from management’s current expectations. Such risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, unforeseen changes in the strength of our customers’ businesses; unforeseen changes in the demand for current and new products, technologies, and services; unforeseen changes in the currency markets; customer purchasing decisions and timing, and the risk that we are not able to realize the savings expected from integration and restructuring activities. In addition, other risks that Agilent faces in running its operations include the ability to execute successfully through business cycles; the ability to meet and achieve the benefits of its cost-reduction goals and otherwise successfully adapt its cost structures to continuing changes in business conditions; ongoing competitive, pricing and gross-margin pressures; the risk that our cost-cutting initiatives will impair our ability to develop products and remain competitive and to operate effectively; the impact of geopolitical uncertainties and global economic conditions on our operations, our markets and our ability to conduct business; the ability to improve asset performance to adapt to changes in demand; the ability of our supply chain to adapt to changes in demand; the ability to successfully introduce new products at the right time, price and mix; the ability of Agilent to successfully integrate recent acquisitions; the ability of Agilent to successfully comply with certain complex regulations; and other risks detailed in Agilent’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including our annual report on form 10-K for the year ended Oct. 31, 2016. Forward-looking statements are based on the beliefs and assumptions of Agilent’s management and on currently available information. Agilent undertakes no responsibility to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statement. (1) Non-GAAP net income and non-GAAP earnings per share primarily excludes the impacts of acquisition and integration costs, transformation initiatives, business exit and divestiture costs, non-cash intangibles amortization, and pension settlement and curtailment gains. We also exclude any tax benefits that are not directly related to ongoing operations and which are either isolated or is not expected to occur again with any regularity or predictability. A reconciliation between non-GAAP net income and GAAP net income is set forth on page 5 of the attached tables along with additional information regarding the use of this non-GAAP measure. (2) Core revenue growth excludes the impact of currency, the NMR business and acquisitions and divestitures within the past 12 months. Core revenue is a non-GAAP measure. A reconciliation between Q1 FY17 GAAP revenue and core revenue is set forth on page 7 of the attached tables along with additional information regarding the use of this non-GAAP measure. Core revenue growth as projected for full fiscal year 2017 excludes the impact of currency, the NMR business and acquisitions and divestitures within the past 12 months. Most of these exclude amounts that pertain to events that have not yet occurred and are not currently possible to estimate with a reasonable degree of accuracy and could differ materially. Therefore, no reconciliation to GAAP amounts has been provided. (3) Non-GAAP earnings per share as projected for Q2 FY17 and full fiscal year 2017 excludes primarily the future impact of acquisition and integration costs, pension settlement gain, and non-cash intangibles amortization. We also exclude any tax benefits that are not directly related to ongoing operations and which are either isolated or is not expected to occur again with any regularity or predictability. Most of these excluded amounts that pertain to events that have not yet occurred and are not currently possible to estimate with a reasonable degree of accuracy and could differ materially. Therefore, no reconciliation to GAAP amounts has been provided. Future amortization of intangibles is expected to be approximately $32 million per quarter. NOTE TO EDITORS: Further technology, corporate citizenship and executive news is available on the Agilent news site at www.agilent.com/go/news.

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