Genomics and Bioinformatics Platform of Andalusia GBPA

Sevilla, Spain

Genomics and Bioinformatics Platform of Andalusia GBPA

Sevilla, Spain

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Hackenberg M.,University of Granada | Rueda A.,Genomics and Bioinformatics Platform of Andalusia GBPA | Gustafson P.,University of Missouri | Langridge P.,University of Adelaide | Shi B.-J.,University of Adelaide
BMC Genomics | Year: 2016

Background: Various small RNA (sRNA) sizes and varieties have been identified, but their relationship as well as relationship with their origins and allocations have not been well understood or investigated. Results: By comparing sRNAs generated from two barley cultivars, Golden Promise (GP) and Pallas, we identified that the generation of different sizes and types of sRNAs in barley was locus-, chromosome- and/or cultivar-dependent. 20-nt sRNAs mainly comprising miRNAs and chloroplast-derived sRNAs were significantly over-expressed in Pallas vs. GP on chromosomes 3H and 6H. MiRNAs-enriched 21-nt sRNAs were significantly over-expressed in Pallas vs. GP only on chromosome 4H. On chromosome 5H this size of sRNAs was significantly under-expressed in Pallas, so were 22-nt sRNAs mainly comprising miRNAs and repeat-derived sRNAs. 24-nt sRNAs mostly derived from repeats were evenly distributed in all chromosomes and expressed similarly between GP and Pallas. Unlike other sizes of sRNAs, 24-nt sRNAs were little conserved in other plant species. Abundant sRNAs were mostly generated from 3' terminal regions of chromosome 1H and 5' terminal regions of chromosome 5H. Over-expressed miRNAs in GP vs. Pallas primarily function in stress responses and iron-binding. Conclusions: Our study indicates that 23-24-nt sRNAs may be linked to repressive chromatin modifications and function in genome stability while 20-21-nt sRNAs may be important for the cultivar specificity. This study provides a novel insight into the mechanism of sRNA expression and function in barley. © 2016 The Author(s).


Gonzalez-del Pozo M.,University of Seville | Mendez-Vidal C.,University of Seville | Bravo-Gil N.,University of Seville | Vela-Boza A.,Genomics and Bioinformatics Platform of Andalusia GBPA | And 3 more authors.
PloS one | Year: 2014

This study aimed to identify the underlying molecular genetic cause in four Spanish families clinically diagnosed of Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP), comprising one autosomal dominant RP (adRP), two autosomal recessive RP (arRP) and one with two possible modes of inheritance: arRP or X-Linked RP (XLRP). We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) using NimbleGen SeqCap EZ Exome V3 sample preparation kit and SOLID 5500xl platform. All variants passing filter criteria were validated by Sanger sequencing to confirm familial segregation and the absence in local control population. This strategy allowed the detection of: (i) one novel heterozygous splice-site deletion in RHO, c.937-2_944del, (ii) one rare homozygous mutation in C2orf71, c.1795T>C; p.Cys599Arg, not previously associated with the disease, (iii) two heterozygous null mutations in ABCA4, c.2041C>T; p.R681* and c.6088C>T; p.R2030*, and (iv) one mutation, c.2405-2406delAG; p.Glu802Glyfs*31 in the ORF15 of RPGR. The molecular findings for RHO and C2orf71 confirmed the initial diagnosis of adRP and arRP, respectively, while patients with the two ABCA4 mutations, both previously associated with Stargardt disease, presented symptoms of RP with early macular involvement. Finally, the X-Linked inheritance was confirmed for the family with the RPGR mutation. This latter finding allowed the inclusion of carrier sisters in our preimplantational genetic diagnosis program.


Mendez-Vidal C.,University of Seville | Bravo-Gil N.,University of Seville | Gonzalez-Del Pozo M.,University of Seville | Vela-Boza A.,Genomics and Bioinformatics Platform of Andalusia GBPA | And 3 more authors.
BMC genetics | Year: 2014

BACKGROUND: Molecular diagnosis of Inherited Retinal Dystrophies (IRD) has long been challenging due to the extensive clinical and genetic heterogeneity present in this group of disorders. Here, we describe the clinical application of an integrated next-generation sequencing approach to determine the underlying genetic defects in a Spanish family with a provisional clinical diagnosis of autosomal recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa (arRP).RESULTS: Exome sequencing of the index patient resulted in the identification of the homozygous BBS1 p.M390R mutation. Sanger sequencing of additional members of the family showed lack of co-segregation of the p.M390R variant in some individuals. Clinical reanalysis indicated co-ocurrence of two different phenotypes in the same family: Bardet-Biedl syndrome in the individual harboring the BBS1 mutation and non-syndromic arRP in extended family members. To identify possible causative mutations underlying arRP, we conducted disease-targeted gene sequencing using a panel of 26 IRD genes. The in-house custom panel was validated using 18 DNA samples known to harbor mutations in relevant genes. All variants were redetected, indicating a high mutation detection rate. This approach allowed the identification of two novel heterozygous null mutations in RP1 (c.4582_4585delATCA; p.I1528Vfs*10 and c.5962dupA; p.I1988Nfs*3) which co-segregated with the disease in arRP patients. Additionally, a mutational screening in 96 patients of our cohort with genetically unresolved IRD revealed the presence of the c.5962dupA mutation in one unrelated family.CONCLUSIONS: The combination of molecular findings for RP1 and BBS1 genes through exome and gene panel sequencing enabled us to explain the co-existence of two different retinal phenotypes in a family. The identification of two novel variants in RP1 suggests that the use of panels containing the prevalent genes of a particular population, together with an optimized data analysis pipeline, is an efficient and cost-effective approach that can be reliably implemented into the routine diagnostic process of diverse inherited retinal disorders. Moreover, the identification of these novel variants in two unrelated families supports the relatively high prevalence of RP1 mutations in Spanish population and the role of private mutations for commonly mutated genes, while extending the mutational spectrum of RP1.


PubMed | University of Missouri, University of Adelaide, University of Granada and Genomics and Bioinformatics Platform of Andalusia GBPA
Type: Journal Article | Journal: BMC genomics | Year: 2016

Various small RNA (sRNA) sizes and varieties have been identified, but their relationship as well as relationship with their origins and allocations have not been well understood or investigated.By comparing sRNAs generated from two barley cultivars, Golden Promise (GP) and Pallas, we identified that the generation of different sizes and types of sRNAs in barley was locus-, chromosome- and/or cultivar-dependent. 20-nt sRNAs mainly comprising miRNAs and chloroplast-derived sRNAs were significantly over-expressed in Pallas vs. GP on chromosomes 3H and 6H. MiRNAs-enriched 21-nt sRNAs were significantly over-expressed in Pallas vs. GP only on chromosome 4H. On chromosome 5H this size of sRNAs was significantly under-expressed in Pallas, so were 22-nt sRNAs mainly comprising miRNAs and repeat-derived sRNAs. 24-nt sRNAs mostly derived from repeats were evenly distributed in all chromosomes and expressed similarly between GP and Pallas. Unlike other sizes of sRNAs, 24-nt sRNAs were little conserved in other plant species. Abundant sRNAs were mostly generated from 3 terminal regions of chromosome 1H and 5 terminal regions of chromosome 5H. Over-expressed miRNAs in GP vs. Pallas primarily function in stress responses and iron-binding.Our study indicates that 23-24-nt sRNAs may be linked to repressive chromatin modifications and function in genome stability while 20-21-nt sRNAs may be important for the cultivar specificity. This study provides a novel insight into the mechanism of sRNA expression and function in barley.


PubMed | University of Seville and Genomics and Bioinformatics Platform of Andalusia GBPA
Type: | Journal: BMC genetics | Year: 2015

Molecular diagnosis of Inherited Retinal Dystrophies (IRD) has long been challenging due to the extensive clinical and genetic heterogeneity present in this group of disorders. Here, we describe the clinical application of an integrated next-generation sequencing approach to determine the underlying genetic defects in a Spanish family with a provisional clinical diagnosis of autosomal recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa (arRP).Exome sequencing of the index patient resulted in the identification of the homozygous BBS1 p.M390R mutation. Sanger sequencing of additional members of the family showed lack of co-segregation of the p.M390R variant in some individuals. Clinical reanalysis indicated co-ocurrence of two different phenotypes in the same family: Bardet-Biedl syndrome in the individual harboring the BBS1 mutation and non-syndromic arRP in extended family members. To identify possible causative mutations underlying arRP, we conducted disease-targeted gene sequencing using a panel of 26 IRD genes. The in-house custom panel was validated using 18 DNA samples known to harbor mutations in relevant genes. All variants were redetected, indicating a high mutation detection rate. This approach allowed the identification of two novel heterozygous null mutations in RP1 (c.4582_4585delATCA; p.I1528Vfs*10 and c.5962dupA; p.I1988Nfs*3) which co-segregated with the disease in arRP patients. Additionally, a mutational screening in 96 patients of our cohort with genetically unresolved IRD revealed the presence of the c.5962dupA mutation in one unrelated family.The combination of molecular findings for RP1 and BBS1 genes through exome and gene panel sequencing enabled us to explain the co-existence of two different retinal phenotypes in a family. The identification of two novel variants in RP1 suggests that the use of panels containing the prevalent genes of a particular population, together with an optimized data analysis pipeline, is an efficient and cost-effective approach that can be reliably implemented into the routine diagnostic process of diverse inherited retinal disorders. Moreover, the identification of these novel variants in two unrelated families supports the relatively high prevalence of RP1 mutations in Spanish population and the role of private mutations for commonly mutated genes, while extending the mutational spectrum of RP1.


Rueda A.,Genomics and Bioinformatics Platform of Andalusia GBPA | Barturen G.,University of Granada | Lebron R.,University of Granada | Gomez-Martin C.,University of Granada | And 3 more authors.
Nucleic acids research | Year: 2015

Small RNA research is a rapidly growing field. Apart from microRNAs, which are important regulators of gene expression, other types of functional small RNA molecules have been reported in animals and plants. MicroRNAs are important in host-microbe interactions and parasite microRNAs might modulate the innate immunity of the host. Furthermore, small RNAs can be detected in bodily fluids making them attractive non-invasive biomarker candidates. Given the general broad interest in small RNAs, and in particular microRNAs, a large number of bioinformatics aided analysis types are needed by the scientific community. To facilitate integrated sRNA research, we developed sRNAtoolbox, a set of independent but interconnected tools for expression profiling from high-throughput sequencing data, consensus differential expression, target gene prediction, visual exploration in a genome context as a function of read length, gene list analysis and blast search of unmapped reads. All tools can be used independently or for the exploration and downstream analysis of sRNAbench results. Workflows like the prediction of consensus target genes of parasite microRNAs in the host followed by the detection of enriched pathways can be easily established. The web-interface interconnecting all these tools is available at http://bioinfo5.ugr.es/srnatoolbox. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.


Lopez-Domingo F.J.,Genomics and Bioinformatics Platform of Andalusia GBPA | Florido J.P.,Genomics and Bioinformatics Platform of Andalusia GBPA | Rueda A.,Genomics and Bioinformatics Platform of Andalusia GBPA | Dopazo J.,Genomics and Bioinformatics Platform of Andalusia GBPA | And 2 more authors.
Bioinformatics | Year: 2014

Motivation: Targeted enrichment sequencing by next-generation sequencing is a common approach to interrogate specific loci or the whole exome in the human genome. The efficiency and the lack of bias in the enrichment process need to be assessed as a quality control step before performing downstream analysis of the sequence data. Tools that can report on the sensitivity, specificity, uniformity and other enrichment-specific features are needed. Results: We have implemented the next-generation sequencing data Capture Assessment Tool (ngsCAT), a tool that takes the information of the mapped reads and the coordinates of the targeted regions as input files, and generates a report with metrics and figures that allows the evaluation of the efficiency of the enrichment process. The tool can also take as input the information of two samples allowing the comparison of two different experiments. © 2014 The Author. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.


Ortuno F.M.,CITIC UGR | Valenzuela O.,University of Granada | Rojas F.,CITIC UGR | Pomares H.,CITIC UGR | And 3 more authors.
Bioinformatics | Year: 2013

Motivation: Multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) are widely used approaches in bioinformatics to carry out other tasks such as structure predictions, biological function analyses or phylogenetic modeling. However, current tools usually provide partially optimal alignments, as each one is focused on specific biological features. Thus, the same set of sequences can produce different alignments, above all when sequences are less similar. Consequently, researchers and biologists do not agree about which is the most suitable way to evaluate MSAs. Recent evaluations tend to use more complex scores including further biological features. Among them, 3D structures are increasingly being used to evaluate alignments. Because structures are more conserved in proteins than sequences, scores with structural information are better suited to evaluate more distant relationships between sequences.Results: The proposed multiobjective algorithm, based on the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm, aims to jointly optimize three objectives: STRIKE score, non-gaps percentage and totally conserved columns. It was significantly assessed on the BAliBASE benchmark according to the Kruskal-Wallis test (P < 0.01). This algorithm also outperforms other aligners, such as ClustalW, Multiple Sequence Alignment Genetic Algorithm (MSA-GA), PRRP, DIALIGN, Hidden Markov Model Training (HMMT), Pattern-Induced Multi-sequence Alignment (PIMA), MULTIALIGN, Sequence Alignment Genetic Algorithm (SAGA), PILEUP, Rubber Band Technique Genetic Algorithm (RBT-GA) and Vertical Decomposition Genetic Algorithm (VDGA), according to the Wilcoxon signed-rank test (P < 0.05), whereas it shows results not significantly different to 3D-COFFEE (P > 0.05) with the advantage of being able to use less structures. Structural information is included within the objective function to evaluate more accurately the obtained alignments. Availability: The source code is available at http://www.ugr.es/∼fortuno/ MOSAStrE/MO-SAStrE.zip. Supplementary Information: Supplementary material is available at Bioinformatics online. © 2013 The Author.


Caba O.,University of Jaén | Prados J.,University of Granada | Ortiz R.,University of Jaén | Jimenez-Luna C.,University of Granada | And 10 more authors.
Digestive Diseases and Sciences | Year: 2014

Background: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal malignancy associated with poor survival rates. Fast detection of PDAC appears to be the most relevant strategy to improve the long-term survival of patients. Aims: Our objective was to identify new markers in peripheral blood that differentiates between PDAC patients and healthy controls. Methods: Peripheral blood samples from PDAC patients (n = 18) and controls (n = 18) were analyzed by whole genome cDNA microarray hybridization. The most relevant genes were validated by quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) in the same set of samples. Finally, our gene prediction set was tested in a blinded set of new peripheral blood samples (n = 30). Results: Microarray studies identified 87 genes differentially expressed in peripheral blood samples from PDAC patients. Four of these genes were selected for analysis by RT-qPCR, which confirmed the previously observed changes. In our blinded validation study, the combination of CLEC4D and IRAK3 predicted the diagnosis of PDAC with 93 % accuracy, with a sensitivity of 86 % and specificity of 100 %. Conclusions: Peripheral blood gene expression profiling is an useful tool for the diagnosis of PDAC. We present a validated four-gene predictor set (ANKRD22, CLEC4D, VNN1, and IRAK3) that may be useful in PDAC diagnosis. © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York.


PubMed | University of Granada and Genomics and Bioinformatics Platform of Andalusia GBPA
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Nucleic acids research | Year: 2015

Small RNA research is a rapidly growing field. Apart from microRNAs, which are important regulators of gene expression, other types of functional small RNA molecules have been reported in animals and plants. MicroRNAs are important in host-microbe interactions and parasite microRNAs might modulate the innate immunity of the host. Furthermore, small RNAs can be detected in bodily fluids making them attractive non-invasive biomarker candidates. Given the general broad interest in small RNAs, and in particular microRNAs, a large number of bioinformatics aided analysis types are needed by the scientific community. To facilitate integrated sRNA research, we developed sRNAtoolbox, a set of independent but interconnected tools for expression profiling from high-throughput sequencing data, consensus differential expression, target gene prediction, visual exploration in a genome context as a function of read length, gene list analysis and blast search of unmapped reads. All tools can be used independently or for the exploration and downstream analysis of sRNAbench results. Workflows like the prediction of consensus target genes of parasite microRNAs in the host followed by the detection of enriched pathways can be easily established. The web-interface interconnecting all these tools is available at http://bioinfo5.ugr.es/srnatoolbox.

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