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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Today (April 12), UC Davis researchers announced in Nature Communications that they have unlocked a treasure-trove of genetic information about lettuce and related plants, releasing the first comprehensive genome assembly for lettuce and the huge Compositae plant family. Garden lettuce, or Lactuca sativa, is the plant species that includes a salad bar's worth of lettuce types, ranging from iceberg to romaine. With an annual on-farm value of more than $2.4 billion, it is the most valuable fresh vegetable and one of the 10 most valuable crops, overall, in the United States. Lettuce is a member of the huge Compositae family, which includes the good, the bad, and the ugly of the plant world, from the daisy and sunflower to ragweed and the dreaded star thistle. The genome assembly -- a compilation of millions of DNA sequences into a useful genetic portrait -- provides researchers with a valuable tool for exploring the Compositae family's many related plant species. "This genome assembly provides the foundation for numerous further genetic, evolutionary and functional studies of this whole family of plants," said Sebastian Reyes-Chin-Wo, the lead author and a graduate student in the laboratory of plant geneticist Richard Michelmore. "This is particularly significant because Compositae is the most successful family of flowering plants on earth in terms of the number of species and environments inhabited," said Richard Michelmore, who directs the UC Davis Genome Center. The researchers found that specific genes in the lettuce genome were consistent with certain physical traits -- like the production of a rubber-containing milky sap -- that have also been found in taxonomically distinct species, such as the rubber tree. The study also provided evidence that somewhere during the evolution of lettuce about 45 million years ago, its genome was "triplicated." As a result, one-fourth of the genome -- including about 30 percent of all of its identified genes -- now appears in multiple related regions. Because such genomic duplications may give plant species an advantage in colonizing new environments, the ancient triplication event might, in part, explain the success of the Compositae plant family. Michelmore noted that this is the first reported genome assembly of a plant species resulting from use of a new technology that gives information about the physical proximity of the DNA sequences to which proteins are bound. The new approach, developed by Dovetail Genomics, a company spun out from UC Santa Cruz, resulted in a more contiguous and accurate genome assembly, even though lettuce has one of the larger plant genomes sequenced to date, he said. The sequencing was done in collaboration with the genomics firm BGI. Funding was provided by 10 plant breeding companies through the Lettuce Genomics Sequencing Consortium, UC Davis Genome Center, National Science Foundation and U.S. Department of Agriculture.


News Article | May 1, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

PITTSBURGH, May 1, 2017 - A novel gene therapy using CRISPR genome editing technology effectively targets cancer-causing "fusion genes" and improves survival in mouse models of aggressive liver and prostate cancers, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine researchers report in a study published online today in Nature Biotechnology. "This is the first time that gene editing has been used to specifically target cancer fusion genes. It is really exciting because it lays the groundwork for what could become a totally new approach to treating cancer," explained lead study author Jian-Hua Luo, M.D., Ph.D., professor of pathology at Pitt's School of Medicine and director of its High Throughput Genome Center. Fusion genes, which often are associated with cancer, form when two previously separate genes become joined together and produce an abnormal protein that can cause or promote cancer. Luo and his team had previously identified a panel of fusion genes responsible for recurrent and aggressive prostate cancer. In a study published earlier this year in the journal Gastroenterology, the team reported that one of these fusion genes, known as MAN2A1-FER, also is found in several other types of cancer, including that of the liver, lungs and ovaries, and is responsible for rapid tumor growth and invasiveness. In the current study, the researchers employed the CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology to target unique DNA sequences formed because of the gene fusion. The team used viruses to deliver the gene editing tools that cut out the mutated DNA of the fusion gene and replaced it with a gene that leads to death of the cancer cells. Because the fusion gene is present only in cancer cells, not healthy ones, the gene therapy is highly specific. Such an approach could come with significantly fewer side effects when translated to the clinic, which is a major concern with other cancer treatments such as chemotherapy. To conduct the study, the researchers used mouse models that had received transplants of human prostate and liver cancer cells. Editing the cancer fusion gene resulted in up to 30 percent reduction in tumor size. None of the mice exhibited metastasis and all survived during the eight-week observation period. In contrast, in control mice treated with viruses designed to cut out another fusion gene not present in their tumors, the tumors increased nearly 40-fold in size, metastasis was observed in most animals, and all died before the end of the study. The new findings suggest a completely new way to combat cancer. "Other types of cancer treatments target the foot soldiers of the army. Our approach is to target the command center, so there is no chance for the enemy's soldiers to regroup in the battlefield for a comeback," said Luo. Another advantage over traditional cancer treatment is that the new approach is very adaptive. A common problem that renders standard chemotherapies ineffective is that the cancer cells evolve to generate new mutations. Using genome editing, the new mutations could be targeted to continue fighting the disease, Luo noted. In the future, the researchers plan to test whether this strategy could completely eradicate the disease rather than induce the partial remission observed in the current study. This work was supported by National Institutes of Health grant RO1 CA098249, Department of Defense grant W81XWH-16-1-0364 and a grant from the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. Additional authors include: Zhang-Hui Chen, Ph.D., Yan Yu, M.D., Ph.D., Ze-Hua Zuo, Ph.D., Joel Nelson, M.D., George Michalopoulos, M.D., Ph.D., Satdatshan Monga, M.D., Silvia Liu, B.S., and George Tseng, Sc.D., all of Pitt. About the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine As one of the nation's leading academic centers for biomedical research, the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine integrates advanced technology with basic science across a broad range of disciplines in a continuous quest to harness the power of new knowledge and improve the human condition. Driven mainly by the School of Medicine and its affiliates, Pitt has ranked among the top 10 recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health since 1998. In rankings recently released by the National Science Foundation, Pitt ranked fifth among all American universities in total federal science and engineering research and development support. Likewise, the School of Medicine is equally committed to advancing the quality and strength of its medical and graduate education programs, for which it is recognized as an innovative leader, and to training highly skilled, compassionate clinicians and creative scientists well-equipped to engage in world-class research. The School of Medicine is the academic partner of UPMC, which has collaborated with the University to raise the standard of medical excellence in Pittsburgh and to position health care as a driving force behind the region's economy. For more information about the School of Medicine, see http://www. .


Our world seems to grow smaller by the day as biodiversity rapidly dwindles, but Mother Earth still has a surprise or two up her sleeve. An international team of researchers were the first to investigate a never before studied species -- a giant, black, mud dwelling, worm-like animal. The odd animal doesn't seem to eat much, instead it gets its energy from a form of sulfur. The findings, led by scientists at the University of Utah, Northeastern University, University of the Philippines, Sultan Kudarat State University and Drexel University, will be published online in the Apr. 17 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. People have known about the existence of the creature for centuries. The three- to five-foot long, tusk-like shells that encase the animal were first documented in the 18th century. "The shells are fairly common," begins lead investigator Daniel Distel, Ph.D., a research professor and director of the Ocean Genome Legacy Center at Northeastern University, "But we have never had access to the animal living inside." The animal's preferred habitat was unclear, but the research team benefitted from a bit of serendipity when one of their collaborators shared a documentary that aired on Philippine television. The video showed the bizarre creatures planted, like carrots, in the mud of a shallow lagoon. Following this lead, the scientists set up an expedition and found live specimens of Kuphus polythalamia. With a live giant shipworm finally in hand, the research team huddled around Distel as he carefully washed the sticky mud caked to the outside of the giant shipworm shell and tapped off the outer cap, revealing the creature living inside. "I was awestruck when I first saw the sheer immensity of this bizarre animal," says Marvin Altamia, researcher at the marine sciences institute, University of the Philippines. "Being present for the first encounter of an animal like this is the closest I will ever get to being a 19th century naturalist," says the study's senior author Margo Haygood, a research professor in medicinal chemistry at the University of Utah College of Pharmacy. Because the animal had never been studied rigorously, little was known about its life history, habitat, or biology. "We suspected the giant shipworm was radically different from other wood-eating shipworms," says Haygood. "Finding the animal confirmed that." Altamia continues, "Frankly, I was nervous. If we made a mistake, we could lose the opportunity to discover the secrets of this very rare specimen." The scientists were then faced with an interesting dilemma explain why Kuphus is so unusual. The answer may lie in the remote habitat in which it was found, a lagoon laden with rotting wood. The normal shipworm burrows deep into the wood of trees that have washed into the ocean, munching on and digesting the wood with the help of bacteria. Unlike its shipworm cousins, Kuphus lives in the mud. It also turns to bacteria to obtain nourishment, but in a different way. Kuphus lives in a pretty stinky place. The organic-rich mud around its habitat emits hydrogen sulfide, a gas derived from sulfur, which has a distinct rotten egg odor. This environment may be noxious for you and me, but it is a feast for the giant shipworm. And yet Kuphus themselves don't eat, or if they do, they eat very little. Instead, they rely on beneficial bacteria that live in their gills that make food for them. Like tiny chefs, these bacteria use the hydrogen sulfide as energy to produce organic carbon that feeds the shipworm. This process is similar to the way green plants use the sun's energy to convert carbon dioxide in the air into simple carbon compounds during photosynthesis. As a result, many of Kuphus's internal digestive organs have shrunk from lack of use. The giant shipworm's lifestyle lends support to a hypothesis proposed by Distel almost two decades ago. Acquiring a different type of beneficial bacteria could explain how shipworms transition from a wood-eating organism to one that uses a noxious gas in mud to survive. The research team will continue to examine the role wood plays in the unique transition between the normal shipworm and the giant shipworm. "We are also interested to see if similar transitions can be found for other animals that live in unique habitats around the world," said Distel. The discovery of this flagship creature expands on our understanding of biodiversity in the Indo-Pacific region, which was made possible through collaborative nature of this interdisciplinary, international research group. This work is an important component of research grants provided by the International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups program. The program helps researchers conduct projects in developing countries to identify unique, novel compounds for future drug development, while building research capacity and conserving biodiversity in the host country. Distel and Haygood collaborated with colleagues from University of Utah, Drexel University, Second Genome in San Francisco, Ecole Normale Superieure, France and the University of the Philippines, the Sultan Kudarat State University and the Philippine Genome Center in the Philippines. The research was funded by National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation and U.S Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute.


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

The San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego has been awarded a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant that will augment its campus computing cluster with targeted capabilities for bioinformatics analyses to support researchers across campus and their collaborators – including the ability to conduct de-multiplexing, mapping, and variant calling of a single human genome in less than one hour. The grant is part of the NSF’s Campus Cyberinfrastructure (CC*) program, which invests in coordinated campus-level cyberinfrastructure (CI) components of data, networking, computing infrastructure, capabilities, and integrated services that lead to higher levels of performance, reliability, and predictability for science applications and distributed research projects. Learning and workforce development in CI is explicitly addressed in the program, and science-driven requirements are the primary motivation for any proposed activity. “This new award illustrates SDSC’s increasing role in providing high-performance campus cyberinfrastructure in addition to its ongoing national supercomputing role,” said SDSC Director Michael Norman. “Through the capabilities enabled by this award, we expect to see substantial gains in productivity that should be of benefit to many UC San Diego researchers using bioinformatics tools and techniques for life sciences research.” “A key objective of this project is to leverage new technology to provide accelerated computing capacity so that researchers can conduct approximately 8,000 whole-genome analyses per year, plus the ability to conduct quick turnaround single-genome analyses in about one hour,” said Ron Hawkins, SDSC’s Industry Relations director and the principal investigator for the project. “The latter capability could be particularly useful for precision medicine and emerging clinical applications of genomics.” “The project will enable analysis and re-analysis of existing genome data in the context of the new genomes that will be sequenced over the coming years,” said Terry Gaasterland, a co-investigator in the project as well as a UC San Diego professor of computational biology and genomics, and director of the Scripps Genome Center. “This ability will bring new value to genome information and will accelerate how we tie genome variants to diagnosis and prediction of progression, onset and response to therapy.” The NSF award, valued at almost half a million dollars and slated to run through January 2018, provides funding for new hardware for UC San Diego’s Triton Shared Computing Cluster, or TSCC, a “condo computing” program established in 2013 that has seen strong growth over the last two years. Condo computing is a form of shared ownership model in which researchers use funds from grants or other sources to purchase and contribute compute “nodes” (computer servers) to the system.  The result is a researcher-owned, shared computing resource of medium- to large-proportions and much larger than could typically be afforded by the typical principal investigator for dedicated use.  The already large and growing life sciences research enterprise at UC San Diego is an increasing consumer of computing capacity on TSCC. Under the NSF award, SDSC will implement a separately scheduled partition of TSCC with technology designed to address key areas of bioinformatics computing including genomics, transcriptomics, and immune receptor repertoire analysis. Called ‘BioBurst’, the system will incorporate the following major components: “UC San Diego is grateful for this new support from the National Science Foundation’s CC* program to enhance the power of TSCC,” said Valerie Polichar, Director of Research IT Services at UC San Diego.  “This award extends our overall research capabilities to innovatively enable our biomedical and life sciences researchers to push the boundaries of science through new computational resources and methods.”


CHICAGO, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Andrea Califano, a pioneer in cancer systems biology and a renowned researcher at Columbia University, has joined the Tempus Scientific Advisory Board. In this role, he will serve as an advisor to the company and will bring his decades of experience researching the clinical implications of how DNA mutations and RNA expression levels interact at the proteomic level. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/41e3b884-5da3-4ca3-be81-004d958c132b “I have spent my career working to determine the genetic drivers of cancer and believe that with the intersection of science and technology, we are on the verge of transforming the way cancer care is delivered,” said Dr. Andrea Califano. “I am excited to join the Scientific Board at Tempus and to help them accelerate the broad application of data in both the research and clinical environment.” Dr. Califano is the Clyde and Helen Wu Professor of Chemical Systems Biology at Columbia University Medical Center. He is the Founding Chair of the Department of Systems Biology, Director of the JP Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center, and Associate Director for Bioinformatics of the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, and also holds appointments in the Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics and Department of Biomedical Informatics. He joins the board along with Dr. Arul M. Chinnaiyan and Dr. David Agus. Meanwhile, DarwinHealth, a precision focused cancer medicine company, co-founded by Dr. Califano, that uses RNA analysis in an effort to match patients with treatments has partnered with Tempus on a personalized medicine research initiative aimed at improving outcomes for patients diagnosed with cancer. As part of the collaboration, Tempus will use information obtained from DarwinHealth reports in conjunction with approximately 2,000 de-identified patients for whom Tempus has done genetic sequencing of normal, tumor DNA and RNA in an effort to further explore protein interactions and tumor growth. The collaboration with DarwinHealth, using a systems biology approach to cancer care, will leverage the deep molecular and clinical data that Tempus collects daily, and the algorithms that Andrea has developed over the last decade, to help determine the driving force behind various cancers. “At Tempus, we are on a mission to recruit the best and brightest minds in cancer to help shape and guide the future of cancer treatment,” said Eric Lefkofsky, Co-founder and CEO at Tempus. “This partnership is consistent with that commitment as both Andrea and DarwinHealth are pioneering new ways to explore protein interactions that might open the door to an entirely new class of therapeutics.” Tempus provides molecular sequencing and clinical analytic solutions to top academic centers, hospital systems, associations, and healthcare providers. About Tempus: Tempus is a technology company that is building the world’s largest library of molecular and clinical data and an operating system to make that data accessible and useful. We enable physicians to deliver personalized cancer care for patients through our interactive analytical and machine learning platform. We provide genomic sequencing services and analyze molecular and therapeutic data to empower physicians to make real-time, data-driven decisions. Our goal is for each patient to benefit from the treatment of others who came before by providing physicians with tools that learn as we gather more data. For more information, visit tempus.com.


CHICAGO, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Andrea Califano, a pioneer in cancer systems biology and a renowned researcher at Columbia University, has joined the Tempus Scientific Advisory Board. In this role, he will serve as an advisor to the company and will bring his decades of experience researching the clinical implications of how DNA mutations and RNA expression levels interact at the proteomic level. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/41e3b884-5da3-4ca3-be81-004d958c132b “I have spent my career working to determine the genetic drivers of cancer and believe that with the intersection of science and technology, we are on the verge of transforming the way cancer care is delivered,” said Dr. Andrea Califano. “I am excited to join the Scientific Board at Tempus and to help them accelerate the broad application of data in both the research and clinical environment.” Dr. Califano is the Clyde and Helen Wu Professor of Chemical Systems Biology at Columbia University Medical Center. He is the Founding Chair of the Department of Systems Biology, Director of the JP Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center, and Associate Director for Bioinformatics of the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, and also holds appointments in the Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics and Department of Biomedical Informatics. He joins the board along with Dr. Arul M. Chinnaiyan and Dr. David Agus. Meanwhile, DarwinHealth, a precision focused cancer medicine company, co-founded by Dr. Califano, that uses RNA analysis in an effort to match patients with treatments has partnered with Tempus on a personalized medicine research initiative aimed at improving outcomes for patients diagnosed with cancer. As part of the collaboration, Tempus will use information obtained from DarwinHealth reports in conjunction with approximately 2,000 de-identified patients for whom Tempus has done genetic sequencing of normal, tumor DNA and RNA in an effort to further explore protein interactions and tumor growth. The collaboration with DarwinHealth, using a systems biology approach to cancer care, will leverage the deep molecular and clinical data that Tempus collects daily, and the algorithms that Andrea has developed over the last decade, to help determine the driving force behind various cancers. “At Tempus, we are on a mission to recruit the best and brightest minds in cancer to help shape and guide the future of cancer treatment,” said Eric Lefkofsky, Co-founder and CEO at Tempus. “This partnership is consistent with that commitment as both Andrea and DarwinHealth are pioneering new ways to explore protein interactions that might open the door to an entirely new class of therapeutics.” Tempus provides molecular sequencing and clinical analytic solutions to top academic centers, hospital systems, associations, and healthcare providers. About Tempus: Tempus is a technology company that is building the world’s largest library of molecular and clinical data and an operating system to make that data accessible and useful. We enable physicians to deliver personalized cancer care for patients through our interactive analytical and machine learning platform. We provide genomic sequencing services and analyze molecular and therapeutic data to empower physicians to make real-time, data-driven decisions. Our goal is for each patient to benefit from the treatment of others who came before by providing physicians with tools that learn as we gather more data. For more information, visit tempus.com.


CHICAGO, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Andrea Califano, a pioneer in cancer systems biology and a renowned researcher at Columbia University, has joined the Tempus Scientific Advisory Board. In this role, he will serve as an advisor to the company and will bring his decades of experience researching the clinical implications of how DNA mutations and RNA expression levels interact at the proteomic level. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/41e3b884-5da3-4ca3-be81-004d958c132b “I have spent my career working to determine the genetic drivers of cancer and believe that with the intersection of science and technology, we are on the verge of transforming the way cancer care is delivered,” said Dr. Andrea Califano. “I am excited to join the Scientific Board at Tempus and to help them accelerate the broad application of data in both the research and clinical environment.” Dr. Califano is the Clyde and Helen Wu Professor of Chemical Systems Biology at Columbia University Medical Center. He is the Founding Chair of the Department of Systems Biology, Director of the JP Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center, and Associate Director for Bioinformatics of the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, and also holds appointments in the Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics and Department of Biomedical Informatics. He joins the board along with Dr. Arul M. Chinnaiyan and Dr. David Agus. Meanwhile, DarwinHealth, a precision focused cancer medicine company, co-founded by Dr. Califano, that uses RNA analysis in an effort to match patients with treatments has partnered with Tempus on a personalized medicine research initiative aimed at improving outcomes for patients diagnosed with cancer. As part of the collaboration, Tempus will use information obtained from DarwinHealth reports in conjunction with approximately 2,000 de-identified patients for whom Tempus has done genetic sequencing of normal, tumor DNA and RNA in an effort to further explore protein interactions and tumor growth. The collaboration with DarwinHealth, using a systems biology approach to cancer care, will leverage the deep molecular and clinical data that Tempus collects daily, and the algorithms that Andrea has developed over the last decade, to help determine the driving force behind various cancers. “At Tempus, we are on a mission to recruit the best and brightest minds in cancer to help shape and guide the future of cancer treatment,” said Eric Lefkofsky, Co-founder and CEO at Tempus. “This partnership is consistent with that commitment as both Andrea and DarwinHealth are pioneering new ways to explore protein interactions that might open the door to an entirely new class of therapeutics.” Tempus provides molecular sequencing and clinical analytic solutions to top academic centers, hospital systems, associations, and healthcare providers. About Tempus: Tempus is a technology company that is building the world’s largest library of molecular and clinical data and an operating system to make that data accessible and useful. We enable physicians to deliver personalized cancer care for patients through our interactive analytical and machine learning platform. We provide genomic sequencing services and analyze molecular and therapeutic data to empower physicians to make real-time, data-driven decisions. Our goal is for each patient to benefit from the treatment of others who came before by providing physicians with tools that learn as we gather more data. For more information, visit tempus.com.


CHICAGO, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Andrea Califano, a pioneer in cancer systems biology and a renowned researcher at Columbia University, has joined the Tempus Scientific Advisory Board. In this role, he will serve as an advisor to the company and will bring his decades of experience researching the clinical implications of how DNA mutations and RNA expression levels interact at the proteomic level. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/41e3b884-5da3-4ca3-be81-004d958c132b “I have spent my career working to determine the genetic drivers of cancer and believe that with the intersection of science and technology, we are on the verge of transforming the way cancer care is delivered,” said Dr. Andrea Califano. “I am excited to join the Scientific Board at Tempus and to help them accelerate the broad application of data in both the research and clinical environment.” Dr. Califano is the Clyde and Helen Wu Professor of Chemical Systems Biology at Columbia University Medical Center. He is the Founding Chair of the Department of Systems Biology, Director of the JP Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center, and Associate Director for Bioinformatics of the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, and also holds appointments in the Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics and Department of Biomedical Informatics. He joins the board along with Dr. Arul M. Chinnaiyan and Dr. David Agus. Meanwhile, DarwinHealth, a precision focused cancer medicine company, co-founded by Dr. Califano, that uses RNA analysis in an effort to match patients with treatments has partnered with Tempus on a personalized medicine research initiative aimed at improving outcomes for patients diagnosed with cancer. As part of the collaboration, Tempus will use information obtained from DarwinHealth reports in conjunction with approximately 2,000 de-identified patients for whom Tempus has done genetic sequencing of normal, tumor DNA and RNA in an effort to further explore protein interactions and tumor growth. The collaboration with DarwinHealth, using a systems biology approach to cancer care, will leverage the deep molecular and clinical data that Tempus collects daily, and the algorithms that Andrea has developed over the last decade, to help determine the driving force behind various cancers. “At Tempus, we are on a mission to recruit the best and brightest minds in cancer to help shape and guide the future of cancer treatment,” said Eric Lefkofsky, Co-founder and CEO at Tempus. “This partnership is consistent with that commitment as both Andrea and DarwinHealth are pioneering new ways to explore protein interactions that might open the door to an entirely new class of therapeutics.” Tempus provides molecular sequencing and clinical analytic solutions to top academic centers, hospital systems, associations, and healthcare providers. About Tempus: Tempus is a technology company that is building the world’s largest library of molecular and clinical data and an operating system to make that data accessible and useful. We enable physicians to deliver personalized cancer care for patients through our interactive analytical and machine learning platform. We provide genomic sequencing services and analyze molecular and therapeutic data to empower physicians to make real-time, data-driven decisions. Our goal is for each patient to benefit from the treatment of others who came before by providing physicians with tools that learn as we gather more data. For more information, visit tempus.com.


CHICAGO, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Andrea Califano, a pioneer in cancer systems biology and a renowned researcher at Columbia University, has joined the Tempus Scientific Advisory Board. In this role, he will serve as an advisor to the company and will bring his decades of experience researching the clinical implications of how DNA mutations and RNA expression levels interact at the proteomic level. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/41e3b884-5da3-4ca3-be81-004d958c132b “I have spent my career working to determine the genetic drivers of cancer and believe that with the intersection of science and technology, we are on the verge of transforming the way cancer care is delivered,” said Dr. Andrea Califano. “I am excited to join the Scientific Board at Tempus and to help them accelerate the broad application of data in both the research and clinical environment.” Dr. Califano is the Clyde and Helen Wu Professor of Chemical Systems Biology at Columbia University Medical Center. He is the Founding Chair of the Department of Systems Biology, Director of the JP Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center, and Associate Director for Bioinformatics of the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, and also holds appointments in the Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics and Department of Biomedical Informatics. He joins the board along with Dr. Arul M. Chinnaiyan and Dr. David Agus. Meanwhile, DarwinHealth, a precision focused cancer medicine company, co-founded by Dr. Califano, that uses RNA analysis in an effort to match patients with treatments has partnered with Tempus on a personalized medicine research initiative aimed at improving outcomes for patients diagnosed with cancer. As part of the collaboration, Tempus will use information obtained from DarwinHealth reports in conjunction with approximately 2,000 de-identified patients for whom Tempus has done genetic sequencing of normal, tumor DNA and RNA in an effort to further explore protein interactions and tumor growth. The collaboration with DarwinHealth, using a systems biology approach to cancer care, will leverage the deep molecular and clinical data that Tempus collects daily, and the algorithms that Andrea has developed over the last decade, to help determine the driving force behind various cancers. “At Tempus, we are on a mission to recruit the best and brightest minds in cancer to help shape and guide the future of cancer treatment,” said Eric Lefkofsky, Co-founder and CEO at Tempus. “This partnership is consistent with that commitment as both Andrea and DarwinHealth are pioneering new ways to explore protein interactions that might open the door to an entirely new class of therapeutics.” Tempus provides molecular sequencing and clinical analytic solutions to top academic centers, hospital systems, associations, and healthcare providers. About Tempus: Tempus is a technology company that is building the world’s largest library of molecular and clinical data and an operating system to make that data accessible and useful. We enable physicians to deliver personalized cancer care for patients through our interactive analytical and machine learning platform. We provide genomic sequencing services and analyze molecular and therapeutic data to empower physicians to make real-time, data-driven decisions. Our goal is for each patient to benefit from the treatment of others who came before by providing physicians with tools that learn as we gather more data. For more information, visit tempus.com.


CHICAGO, May 24, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Andrea Califano, a pioneer in cancer systems biology and a renowned researcher at Columbia University, has joined the Tempus Scientific Advisory Board. In this role, he will serve as an advisor to the company and will bring his decades of experience researching the clinical implications of how DNA mutations and RNA expression levels interact at the proteomic level. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/41e3b884-5da3-4ca3-be81-004d958c132b “I have spent my career working to determine the genetic drivers of cancer and believe that with the intersection of science and technology, we are on the verge of transforming the way cancer care is delivered,” said Dr. Andrea Califano. “I am excited to join the Scientific Board at Tempus and to help them accelerate the broad application of data in both the research and clinical environment.” Dr. Califano is the Clyde and Helen Wu Professor of Chemical Systems Biology at Columbia University Medical Center. He is the Founding Chair of the Department of Systems Biology, Director of the JP Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center, and Associate Director for Bioinformatics of the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, and also holds appointments in the Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biophysics and Department of Biomedical Informatics. He joins the board along with Dr. Arul M. Chinnaiyan and Dr. David Agus. Meanwhile, DarwinHealth, a precision focused cancer medicine company, co-founded by Dr. Califano, that uses RNA analysis in an effort to match patients with treatments has partnered with Tempus on a personalized medicine research initiative aimed at improving outcomes for patients diagnosed with cancer. As part of the collaboration, Tempus will use information obtained from DarwinHealth reports in conjunction with approximately 2,000 de-identified patients for whom Tempus has done genetic sequencing of normal, tumor DNA and RNA in an effort to further explore protein interactions and tumor growth. The collaboration with DarwinHealth, using a systems biology approach to cancer care, will leverage the deep molecular and clinical data that Tempus collects daily, and the algorithms that Andrea has developed over the last decade, to help determine the driving force behind various cancers. “At Tempus, we are on a mission to recruit the best and brightest minds in cancer to help shape and guide the future of cancer treatment,” said Eric Lefkofsky, Co-founder and CEO at Tempus. “This partnership is consistent with that commitment as both Andrea and DarwinHealth are pioneering new ways to explore protein interactions that might open the door to an entirely new class of therapeutics.” Tempus provides molecular sequencing and clinical analytic solutions to top academic centers, hospital systems, associations, and healthcare providers. About Tempus: Tempus is a technology company that is building the world’s largest library of molecular and clinical data and an operating system to make that data accessible and useful. We enable physicians to deliver personalized cancer care for patients through our interactive analytical and machine learning platform. We provide genomic sequencing services and analyze molecular and therapeutic data to empower physicians to make real-time, data-driven decisions. Our goal is for each patient to benefit from the treatment of others who came before by providing physicians with tools that learn as we gather more data. For more information, visit tempus.com.

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